From 1 January 2017, new Tesla owners will no longer get unlimited use of Tesla’s supercharging network

Tesla will end the free unlimited use of its supercharging network to new customers after 1 January 2017.

Tesla delays price increases caused by Brexit until 14 January

Owners of new Tesla vehicles will instead get a supply of roughly 1000 miles’ worth of free supercharging credits per year, although existing owners will still get the same supply as they previously did.

Read our Tesla Model S review here

Tesla will now charge owners a “small fee” to use a Tesla supercharger, which, the car maker claims, will continue to cost less than filling a car with an internal combustion engine. The price Tesla charges to use its network will not be fixed and will depend on the cost of energy at that time.

The electric car brand claims that the supercharger is the world’s fastest charging station, providing “up to 170 miles of range in as little as 30 minutes".

Read more: Tesla Model 3 owners will have to pay to use the supercharger network

Tesla has not released any more details on the updates to its charging scheme, although it does add that any new Teslas ordered before 1 January will not be affected, provided that delivery happens before April.

Cars that arrive after this will have to pay to use the supercharger network, which comprises 734 stations and 4605 individual chargers, according to Tesla’s website.

Read our review of the Tesla Model X here

The company recently revealed its solar roof, so it’s thought that this change in strategy could be an attempt to get drivers to adopt Teslas that charge on solar power. Tesla’s wall connector for home charging costs UK users £398 for a system with a 2.5m cable, and £438 with a 7.5m cable. The system can charge at up to the equivalent to 51 miles of range in one hour, claims Tesla.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk also recently revealed that the Model S P100D – the company’s highest-performance model with a 0-60mph time of 2.5sec – would soon get a performance upgrade

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Comments
6

7 November 2016
Tesla's 'free' supercharging was if memory serves me right originally an option, which after a short period was bundled into the price of the car. Of course some folks used it extensively whilst others only occasionally. Effectively most users were subsidising the folks who were using it lots. Getting people to pay for what they use seems fair.

The other issue is that 'free' chargers means that it's harder to build an economic case for building charging stations for other firms than Tesla. So the effect is fewer fast chargers that everyone can use than we'd have had.

My guess is that Tesla will enable other charging standards if possible with their points benefiting everyone.

7 November 2016
There's something wonky with the penultimate para- a UK charger should be capable of supplying 3kW, and one hours charge of 1.65kWh certainly won't take the Tesla 51 miles.

7 November 2016
The majority of homes have a 1-phase grid connection, allowing you to charge up to 7.4 kW or 22 miles/hour*. This is more than sufficient for overnight charging.
Some homes have a 3-phase grid connection. This connection enables you to charge up to 11 kW or 34 miles/hour*.
If more power is available or if you plan to upgrade your grid connection, a Tesla can charge up to 16.5 kW or 51 miles/hour*. To achieve this charge rate, the car needs to be equipped with the High power charger upgrade. --- they got the decimal place wrong, and this only applies if you happen to live in an ex industrial building with an industrial supply!

8 November 2016
This is hardly a surprise with the growing numbers of Tesla cars on the roads. The numbers obviously didn't stack up. But it does remove one of the big selling points from Tesla ownership, and that may prove tricky for Tesla when Porsche and Mercedes and BMW and Audi and Lexus get their electric cars on the road. Does Tesla have enough of a head start? Will the solar tiles and home battery business offset this? Will Trump become president and make V8 engines mandatory?

8 November 2016
androo wrote:

This is hardly a surprise with the growing numbers of Tesla cars on the roads. The numbers obviously didn't stack up. But it does remove one of the big selling points from Tesla ownership, and that may prove tricky for Tesla when Porsche and Mercedes and BMW and Audi and Lexus get their electric cars on the road. Does Tesla have enough of a head start? Will the solar tiles and home battery business offset this? Will Trump become president and make V8 engines mandatory?

Does Tesla have enoug of a head start? Of course it does. This is Elon Musk. Elon. Musk. He can do anything he wants and will achieve everything he sets out to achieve and How dare you compare the transplendent Tesla to an ordinary car manufacturer with its grubby factories and old fashioned ideas.

12 November 2016
What was that noise? Oh yes, an exploding rocket. Mind you, a very clean, shiny rocket.

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