Belgian University team uncovers serious hacking risk to keyless entry system developed by Pektron
10 September 2018

A team of researchers at the University of Leuven, Belgium, have uncovered a serious security flaw in a keyless entry and start system used by brands such as Tesla and McLaren

The team at the Computer Security and Industrial Cryptography research group (COSIC) were able to attack and clone the key fob of two Tesla Model S cars in “a matter of seconds”, allowing an attacker to unlock and start the vehicle. 

The system, developed by software company Pektron, is said to be fitted to a number of high-end models. It’s easier to attack than other systems of this type, according to the research team, because attackers don’t need to be close to the car and key fob at the same time. The released video, below, shows how quickly the Model S can be accessed.

McLaren has confirmed that the research demonstrates a “theoretical vulnerability in our vehicle security systems”, but it has “not been proven to affect our vehicles, and we know of no McLaren that has been compromised in such a way”. Customers are being contacted by email to inform them of the issue, however, and are being sent a signal blocking pouch for the car’s key. 

Tesla previously released a ‘pin to drive’ security feature as a response to the findings, which the researchers recommend owners use alongside disabling the passive entry system. 

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22

10 September 2018

The problem is that the codes have to be transmitted and that means they can be recorded and replicated, the only way I could think of overcoming that would be to use a metal key (as per old skool) or have some sort of synchronous "time code" to sync the key fob with the car. Perhaps the car itself could transmit a random infrared "secret code" to the keyfob after the "last drive". I think this generic keyless entry problem is already well known in any case.

10 September 2018

Nothing to see! Our cars haven't been affected by this! Go away. Lalalala....

Don't they remember BMW a few years back FFS.?

10 September 2018
Cobnapint wrote:

Nothing to see! Our cars haven't been affected by this! Go away. Lalalala....

Don't they remember BMW a few years back FFS.?

Did you miss the bits that said Tesla has sent customers signal blocking pouches, added a pin to drive system and recommended that the keyless entry be turned off FFS ?

XXXX just went POP.

11 September 2018

McLaren that are sending out the Faraday pouches, not Tesla.

11 September 2018
Cobnapint wrote:

McLaren that are sending out the Faraday pouches, not Tesla.

The point is that both manufacturers are doing something yet you suggested that they were not.

XXXX just went POP.

11 September 2018
typos1 wrote:

Cobnapint wrote:

Nothing to see! Our cars haven't been affected by this! Go away. Lalalala....

Don't they remember BMW a few years back FFS.?

Did you miss the bits that said Tesla has sent customers signal blocking pouches, added a pin to drive system and recommended that the keyless entry be turned off FFS ?

Be interested to read that Tesla Recommendation, the article should have stated it. Is it on the Tesla Website? If not where can I read that TESLA recommend turning off the keyless entry for all cars.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

11 September 2018
xxxx wrote:

typos1 wrote:

Cobnapint wrote:

Nothing to see! Our cars haven't been affected by this! Go away. Lalalala....

Don't they remember BMW a few years back FFS.?

Did you miss the bits that said Tesla has sent customers signal blocking pouches, added a pin to drive system and recommended that the keyless entry be turned off FFS ?

Be interested to read that Tesla Recommendation, the article should have stated it. Is it on the Tesla Website? If not where can I read that TESLA recommend turning off the keyless entry for all cars.

Dunno, but theyve been recommending it for months.

XXXX just went POP.

10 September 2018

Stealing a Tesla would be the most pointless thing ever, considering their exact GPS location can be tracked live on a map. You could also probably use the app to control the car remotely while the theif is driving - Turn the heater up to the max and beep the horn constantly. It'll drive the theif insane

11 September 2018

 If the Key is protected by using a Faraday Pouch wouldn’t this be enough to stop the theft...?

Peter Cavellini.

11 September 2018

Blocking pouch haha!

The point of these systems is to be able to keep the key in your pocket without touching it and just jump in and go.

If you have to retrieve it from your pocket and remove from its pouch each time, you might as well just have a normal key!

What happened to rolling codes where the car expected the next code along from a complex algorithm calculated in the keys chip. If they got out of sync several key-presses would be enough for the car to 'catch up' with the sequence on the basis of recent received codes. A cloned key from an intercepted signal would only send an expired code unless it was able to crack the generation algorithm too.

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