Around 200bhp is expected to be offered by the 508 PHEV’s four-cylinder engine, with the motor providing an additional 100bhp

The Peugeot 508 range will be boosted by a new high-output hybrid model next year, offering range-topping pace and pure-electric capability in cars equipped with the sportiest GT trim.

The 508 PHEV will combine a mild hybrid turbocharged 1.6-litre petrol engine set-up to drive the front wheels with a rear-mounted electric motor.

The same system will first be used in the DS 7 Crossback E-Tense, which is also based on the PSA Group’s EMP2 platform, next year.

 

Peugeot has revealed its plug-in hybrid range in Paris - take a look

Around 200bhp is expected to be offered by the 508 PHEV’s four-cylinder engine, assisted by a starter/generator motor. The motor driving the back wheels will provide about 100bhp and enable a pure-electric range of 31 miles (on the WLTP test cycle). It will use energy supplied by a lithium ion battery located beneath the boot floor.

Our Verdict

Peugeot 508 2018 road test review - hero front

Is Peugeot’s rakish new Mondeo rival as good to drive as it is to look at - and has it done enough to best competitor saloons?

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

A company insider told Autocar that this location, which is normally reserved for the spare wheel, was chosen from the very start of the EMP2 platform’s development, so it has no impact on boot space or cabin practicality in the 508 fastback or SW (estate) bodystyles.

It is likely that the 508 PHEV’s powertrain will come exclusively with an eight-speed automatic gearbox, although the rear motor will run independently and drive the axle with direct drive reduction gearing. This layout will be shared with the upcoming plug-in hybrid versions of the 3008 and 5008, which are both also EMP2-based.

Peugeot’s push for electrification is part of PSA’s ambitions to electrify every model in its range. The strategy aims to provide larger cars with plug-in hybrid versions, while smaller CMP-based cars, such as the 208, will spawn fully electric variants.

Read more

Peugeot 508 review 

Peugeot 308 review

Peugeot 3008 review

Join the debate

Comments
13

289

20 July 2018

Now there's a car to bolster PSA's balance sheet.....not!

20 July 2018

Think I'd rather have a spare wheel, 200hp and 2k'ish at a guess off the bill with such a nice looking car.

One reason is lack of a spare wheel is worrying especially when travelling abroad but then I suppose you could store one in the 'proper' boot.

Another,  I'm not the biggest fan of plug-in hybrids although the Prius it shows it can work so maybe they're win me over in time

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

20 July 2018
xxxx wrote:

One reason is lack of a spare wheel is worrying especially when travelling abroad.

Why, you can't fix a puncture abroad?

20 July 2018
Andrew1 wrote:

xxxx wrote:

One reason is lack of a spare wheel is worrying especially when travelling abroad.

Why, you can't fix a puncture abroad?

Yea I can, but it's easier (especially abroad) to change a wheel than try to repair it with the supplied gel, then be maybe buy a new tyre. That's of course if the gel works.

Why do you think people still pay for the optiontional spare wheel still? 

 

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

FMS

24 September 2018
xxxx wrote:

Think I'd rather have a spare wheel, 200hp and 2k'ish at a guess off the bill with such a nice looking car.

One reason is lack of a spare wheel is worrying especially when travelling abroad but then I suppose you could store one in the 'proper' boot.

Another,  I'm not the biggest fan of plug-in hybrids although the Prius it shows it can work so maybe they're win me over in time

 

So it wasn't YOU who was abroad, given the words typed, or is that down to your amazing lack of understanding of the written word?. What do you own and drive, apart from your decrepit sofa?.TwIT

20 July 2018

To suggest that not having a spare wheel has no impact on practicality is daft. Ask someone with a puncture what they would prefer. 

20 July 2018
artill wrote:

To suggest that not having a spare wheel has no impact on practicality is daft. Ask someone with a puncture what they would prefer. 

Whnwas the last time you had a puncture ? I havent had one for more than 15 years.

XXXX just went POP.

20 July 2018
typos1 wrote:

artill wrote:

To suggest that not having a spare wheel has no impact on practicality is daft. Ask someone with a puncture what they would prefer. 

Whnwas the last time you had a puncture ? I havent had one for more than 15 years.

It was about 10 years ago, and having a spare tyre in the boot was very useful then. Next one could be anytime, and i will have a spare tyre with me if/when it happens

20 July 2018
typos1 wrote:

artill wrote:

To suggest that not having a spare wheel has no impact on practicality is daft. Ask someone with a puncture what they would prefer. 

Whnwas the last time you had a puncture ? I havent had one for more than 15 years.

I've been very lucky and had at least one puncture in every car I've owned. I've also been a passenger in someone else's car that had a flat on 3 occasions!

20 July 2018

I honestly think a spare wheel is better than the puncture kit,it can be a spacesaver .We have 5 cars and get about one puncture each year. I am informed that the trouble with the kit is that if you need to use it and it hopefully works,ie the hole is not a gash,the co2 in the canister works etc ,then it will wreck the tyre and you can't repair it . so if you have ararer tyre yo uwould be either being rouipped off for a replacement or strugle to locate one

Pages

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week