Production bottlenecks are to blame for a hiatus in new orders for the Volkswagen Golf GTE plug-in hybrid; Audi is expected to follow suit mid-year with the A3 e-Tron

Volkswagen has suspended orders for the Golf GTE plug-in hybrid as production bottlenecks have built up a considerable lead time for new orders. 

A Volkswagen UK spokesman couldn’t reveal the precise lead times for the last orders placed but confirmed that they're well under one year. The bottlenecks blamed for slow production were also not pinned down to a supply issue or fault with production, so the only solution for Volkswagen to avoid excessively long lead times was to suspend orders of the model. 

A Volkswagen statement reads: “Due to bottlenecks in production and in order to not impose unreasonable waiting times on our customers for new car orders, temporarily the Golf GTE cannot be ordered. We will inform you as soon as this model is available to order again.” 

The Passat GTE, with which the Golf GTE shares its powertrain, remains available to order, as do the fully electric e-Golf and e-Up models.

The production problem follows Tesla’s production bottlenecks experienced with the Model 3, which failed to meet delivery targets and prompted CEO Elon Musk to announce that issues in its Gigafactory were being looked into. 

Despite the Golf’s position as one of the UK’s best-selling cars, the GTE is one of its slowest-selling variants in the UK, with fewer than 2000 registered per year since the model’s introduction in 2015. 

Orders for the Audi A3 e-tron plug-in hybrid are also to be suspended later in the year. Audi UK is awaiting confirmation from the plant as to the official reason for the sales hiatus.

The Golf GTE and A3 e-tron share the same powertrain, although this has not been given as the reason for the pause.

Read more

Top 10 best-selling cars in Britain

Volkswagen Golf GTE review

Tesla falls behind on Model 3 deliveries

 

 

 

Our Verdict

Volkswagen Golf GTE

The industry's biggest power makes a plug-in hybrid for the masses, but is the Volkswagen Golf GTE as sporty as its name suggests?

Join the debate

Comments
18

3 January 2018
So Passat has same drivetrain and sells ok isn't getting production stopped but Golf which doesn't sell well and has same drivetrain has production issues . BS methinks.

3 January 2018

Why have 2 stalling production lines when you stop one and have the other running at an acceptable level.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

3 January 2018

This does sound a bit bizarre because the Passat GTE, which uses a variation of the same powertrain but is also based on the MQB platform,  is still continuing to be produced. But orders for the Audi A3 e-tron, a car that is virtually identical under the skin to the Golf GTE, are also due to be supended despite that car being built in a different factory to the Golf GTE. It seems to me there is more than meets the eye and I suspect there is a more serious problem with both the Golf and A3 rather than just 'bottleneck' issues. Perhaps a problem with the specific powertrains these 2 cars use, which are identical, and/or their use on this version of the MQB platform.

3 January 2018

The 'smoking gun' here is that many prospective GTE customers have had their orders cancelled, often many weeks after placing it. 

My guess, production & quality meltdown. 

By comparison, Toyota have sold 6.2meeeeeellion Prius' over 20 years. 

Sulphur Man

4 January 2018

That would be about 300K a year world-wide!

Stop all production of 'normal' cars: the Prius has taken over!

I smell a rat in the VW story and I believe that I am not the only one: my local friendly dealer has not sold ONE since its introduction!

3 January 2018

Also, more likely, the GTE/e-TRON are selling better and better, leaving VAG with hundreds of thousands of diesels that arent shifting, and diesel production tooling that's a long way from investment payback. So they're stifling the competition - their own competition. 

Its British Leyland all over again.

Sulphur Man

3 January 2018
Sulphur Man wrote:

Also, more likely, the GTE/e-TRON are selling better and better, leaving VAG with hundreds of thousands of diesels that arent shifting, and diesel production tooling that's a long way from investment payback. So they're stifling the competition - their own competition. 

Its British Leyland all over again.

Clearly they arent shifting huge numbers of these cars, 2000 in total since 2015 in the UK proves that so I very much doubt it is because diesels are shifting.

3 January 2018

Very low production numbers means the cost to build each car is far higher than epected. Ergo car produced at a significant loss.

3 January 2018
centenary wrote:

Very low production numbers means the cost to build each car is far higher than epected. Ergo car produced at a significant loss.

Can you just show us the figures of GTE production cost and profit/loss margin and how it affects VAG's profit and loss account? 

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

4 January 2018
centenary wrote:

Very low production numbers means the cost to build each car is far higher than epected. Ergo car produced at a significant loss.

I have the same thing in mind. Read somewhere that the Big boss at VW wants to increase margins as he thinks 2% is far from normal to what Audi and Porsche return. Even Toyotas return 5%. The article blamed how VWs best seller ( Europe's best seller rather) Golf gives more as a car than what its paid for. If they feel that about a model which they sell in thousands every week shifting very few numbers of GTEs since 2015 certainley doesn't look economically viable. May be I'm wrong, someone found a cheat code somewhere . ;-)

If you don't look back at your car after you parked it, you own the wrong car.

Pages

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week