New Panamera will be based on VW's MQB platform

Porsche’s next-generation Panamera, due out in 2016-2017, will be based on the VW Group’s new front engine/rear drive platform, called MSB.

The structure will feature a hybrid material approach forced by more demanding crash regulations. Aluminium will be used to keep weight down, while high-strength steel will be feature for certain parts of the crash structure.

The next Panamera will also remain true to the current car’s packaging concept, in which four low-mounted seats flank a central spine running through the cockpit. 

Porsche is keen to maintain the recipe for the Panamera because the car has been a bigger success for the brand than expected. More than 100,000 Panameras have been sold in the four years since its launch, around 25 per cent more than the company had originally expected.

The biggest market for the Panamera is now China, which has prompted Porsche to introduce a long-wheelbase version. Porsche has already hinted strongly at a Gran Turismo estate version of the next model, while a shorter two-door coupé and a cabriolet can’t be ruled out, either.

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Today’s wide range of powertrains will continue to be offered in the next-generation Panamera, including V6 petrol engines, diesels, V8s and the E-Hybrid petrol-electric plug-in powertrain.

However, rather than use the current supercharged Audi V6 engine, the next E-Hybrid will be powered by Porsche’s newly introduced in-house turbocharged V6.

The weight of the E-Hybrid model is also expected to be usefully reduced. Porsche is forecasting a 15 per cent improvement in the energy density of lithium ion batteries every three years, which should result in the hybrid version shedding around 40kg from its battery pack alone. Today’s newly introduced E-Hybrid plug-in weighs a hefty 2095kg, substantially more than the 1810kg of the similarly powerful 3.0 biturbo V6 Panamera S.

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Comments
6

6 July 2013

It will probably be a great drive but still be hit by the ugly stick.Money cant buy you love......or taste!!

6 July 2013

Flash Harry@

In most people's view,anything is ugly, if you don't like it,but i like ugly,yes it's not pretty,like a Ferrari,but, are Pagani's pretty/ugly?,Lamborghini's? are they the same?,it's down to what you like,doesn't have to look good to be really good.I know it's early, have another Americano, it'll wake you up,think better, don't dismiss my statement.

Peter Cavellini.

7 July 2013

Peter Cavellini wrote:

...In most people's view,anything is ugly, if you don't like it,...

Panamera's looks get slated a lot on this website. I think it looks okay. Not the best in the class but not bad at all. It does extremely well in China and the US. Haven't seen many here though!

9 July 2013

Peter Cavellini wrote:

Flash Harry@

In most people's view,anything is ugly, if you don't like it,but i like ugly,yes it's not pretty,like a Ferrari,but, are Pagani's pretty/ugly?,Lamborghini's? are they the same?,it's down to what you like,doesn't have to look good to be really good.I know it's early, have another Americano, it'll wake you up,think better, don't dismiss my statement.

It is still ugly imo.As Fadyady said it sells well in China and  America.I rest my case!

 

6 July 2013

A shortened 2 door coupe/convertible makes a lot of sense. It would also sit alongside the 911. A risk for Porsche but so was the Panamera and that ws a risk well worth taking.

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Porsche Panamera

Can the four-door Porsche Panamera still do what’s expected of a Porsche?

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