The new automated manual gearbox improves fuel economy and CO2 emissions compared with the standard manual unit
2 August 2012

Volkswagen has added an optional five-speed automated manual gearbox to its new Volkswagen Up city car. It is available to order now and will cost customers a £595 premium over a standard five-speed manual Up.

The Automatic Shift Gearbox (ASG) improves fuel economy and CO2 emissions compared with the manual unit and is available on three-door and five-door Move Up and High Up models (excluding BlueMotion Technology cars). Prices for ASG-equipped cars start from £9675.

When fitted to the 59bhp 1.0-litre Move Up, the new transmission helps the city car to achieve 64.2mpg combined, while emitting 103g/km of CO2. By comparison, the five-speed manual version returns 62.8mpg and emits 105g/km of CO2.

Performance figures for the semi-automatic Up do take a slight hit compared with the manual car; the 0-62mph sprint rises from 14.4sec to 15.3sec for the 59bhp Move Up and from 13.2sec to 13.9sec for the 74bhp High Up model. 

The most frugal Up in the range remains the Move Up BlueMotion Technology, with figures of 68.9mpg and 95g/km. 

The ASG weighs 3kg more than the manual gearbox, at 30kg, and is controlled by two electromechanical actuators, which engage the gears. The clutch is controlled by another electric motor.

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Comments
14

2 August 2012

any idea what it does to the performance?

2 August 2012

I'm surprised it wasn't offered when the Up was launched.

Anyway, will we see a diesel Up? One with the 1.2 TDI Bluemotion engine with 75bhp would be good. It would have similar performance to the 75bhp petrol, but would probably get almost 90mpg. The same engine achieves over 80mpg in the much heavier Polo.

2 August 2012

It's a pity that the automated Up fails to dip below the key 100 g/km point, which would have at least assured some sort of fiscal justification for this model.

And I'm sure that the small benefit in the EU test will not translate into the real world. The test artificially favours automatics by allowing the 'box to select the highest ratio possible, whereas manual models must follow prescribed shift points, with only the first three ratios used during the city part of the test.

 

 

 

2 August 2012

LP in Brighton wrote:

And I'm sure that the small benefit in the EU test will not translate into the real world. The test artificially favours automatics by allowing the 'box to select the highest ratio possible, whereas manual models must follow prescribed shift points, with only the first three ratios used during the city part of the test. 

Thankyou for pointing this out. Its something we should hear from Autocar but we dont!

2 August 2012

artill wrote:

Thankyou for pointing this out. Its something we should hear from Autocar but we dont!

To be fair to Autocar, they have covered the foibles of the European driving cycle test in the past.  Unless they plan to start doing their own lab tests (and sister mag What Car?'s "True MPG" initiative is potentially as misleading as the government testing) with a more suitable protocol, there's no point continuing to bang on about it.

Basically, this is a 21st century Selespeed, and is all about finding an efficient alternative to a heavy & bulky DSG or torque converter autobox for those who can't change up! (see what I did there?) with a regular manual.

2 August 2012

disco.stu wrote:

To be fair to Autocar, they have covered the foibles of the European driving cycle test in the past.   

for those who can't change up! (see what I did there?) with a regular manual.

You are right. But as a person who really doesnt want an auto of any description i get fed up of reading they are more economical. The test is rigged in their favour (i dont know why) and it will probably lead to an ever larger number of cars being auto only in the end.

I read that last year only 7% of cars in the US were bought with a manual, and that was a good year. The choice for the manual driver is getting less all the time.

Oh, and i liked the pun! 

2 August 2012

Surely this could of been sub 100g/km? Kind of pointless that it is so close but not. Would be interesting to see what it does for real world MPG vs the manual.

Yes a simple 1.2 TDI version would be interesting. I have heard nothing of the 0.8 TDI two cyl with electric boost which was rumoured.

3 August 2012

AutoChomp wrote:

 I have heard nothing of the 0.8 TDI two cyl with electric boost which was rumoured.

Sounds like something from concrete mixer/dumper truck territory! Diesel engines need four cylinders. For that matter so do petrol ones.

2 August 2012

Is this the same "ASG" fitted to the Skoda Citigo "Automatic", which has been available on that variant since launch??

2 August 2012

I can change up and down, quite happily, and enjoy.  However, for my motoring  these days, I much prefer an automatic, providing it is a good one.  The novelty of manual changes in congested traffic soon wears off in my book.  Good for VW.  Cannot help feeling that a good CVT is better for town use than an automated manual, but those who won't buy into the CVT idea, then this ASG may be just fine.  Will it suffer the same criticisms, though, that Citroen's (and Smart's) version does?

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