Korean firm unveils ix35 Fuel Cell successor with claimed range of 500 miles

Hyundai has revealed the Nexo – its latest hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) – at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. It has a range of 500 miles and 20% more power than the ix35 Fuel Cell.

The Nexo's range is 135 miles greater than its predecessor's, thanks to a larger battery. The capacity of the fuel cell has shrunk compared with the ix35's, at 95kW to its forebear's 100kW. Power increases from 124kW to 135kW, and the motor's power rises from 132bhp to 159bhp. Torque is also up by around a third, at 291lb ft to the ix35's 221lb ft - speeding up acceleration with the help of the car's lighter weight from 12.5sec to 9.5sec to 60mph. 

Concept cars and new tech: automotive news from CES 2018

Rather than being a variant on an existing member of the Hyundai line-up, the Nexo is a model in its own right and built on a dedicated platform. It will serve as the technological flagship of the brand's ever-growing range of electrified cars, with 18 due for launch by 2025.

Hyundai claims that the powertrain is as durable as internal combustion engine-powered cars, and can be refuelled in as little as five minutes, compared with the several hours of the latest electric vehicles on the market. Despite electric motors being remarkably refined, Hyundai claims to have further improved this for the Nexo - all moving parts are under the bonnet. It's grown in almost every dimension compared with the ix35 too - at 4671mm, it's 262mm longer; it's 38mm wider at 1859mm; but it's 25mm less tall at 1630mm. Interior space is due to grow, as the wheelbase has stretched by 150mm.

The Nexo will be available in select markets from early 2018, although a Hyundai spokesman said that UK cars may not arrive until the end of the year. 

It will also be Hyundai's first test of fully autonomous systems because the car's powertrain is ideal for coping with the high energy demand of autonomous systems – their data handling, communication and sensors – and it has a long range.

These systems include a next-generation Blind Spot Monitor, which demonstrates to the driver their position in relation to other road users, and Lane Following Assist (LFA) and Highway Driving Assist. The former can steer, accelerate and brake the car at speeds from standstill to 90mph. The latter uses map data and builds on LFA to control the car's speed according to the the speed limit of the road, as well as using sensors to detect environmental conditions. The Nexo is also fitted with a remote parking system, enabling the car to park itself with or without a driver aboard.

The model's unveiling comes shortly after Hyundai’s announcement that its first fully autonomous car will arrive in 2021, as a result of the brand's partnership with self-driving technology company Aurora.

Aurora will assist Hyundai in bringing the two brands' technologies to market as quickly and safely as possible, with Level 4 autonomy targeted. Work on the back-end development of the technologies has already begun. 

At last year's CES, Hyundai showcased the Ioniq Autonomous, the first tangible product in its push for driverless motoring. 

The design of the car draws heavily from the FE Fuel Cell Concept shown at the Geneva motor show last year. It's likely to closely match the price of the ix35 Fuel Cell, which started at £53,105. 

Read more

Concept cars and new tech: automotive news from CES 2018

Futuristic Hyundai FE Fuel Cell Concept previews 2018 model

Hyundai ix35 Fuel Cell review

Is the car-buying public ready for autonomy?

Hyundai Ioniq hybrid autonomous – first ride

Our Verdict

Hyundai ix35 Fuel Cell

As Hyundai ramps up its hydrogen car production, can the ix35 gain some traction in the UK

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Comments
19

4 January 2018

Why the Citroen style layered Headlamps look?

9 January 2018
These are exciting times!

4 January 2018

Astoundingly ugly. Hyundai can do better.

4 January 2018

I agree its a bit ugly.. not as ugly as that Mer G wagn brick on wheels - BUT the fact they are pressing on with Hydrogen does excite me as I still believe this is the future  but will be told by governments to buy Electric first so that they keep the Auto industry busy

what's life without imagination

5 January 2018
5wheels wrote:

I agree its a bit ugly.. not as ugly as that Mer G wagn brick on wheels - BUT the fact they are pressing on with Hydrogen does excite me as I still believe this is the future  but will be told by governments to buy Electric first so that they keep the Auto industry busy

Yea that £15,000 Government/EU grant for buying into the Hydrogen myth is no assitance/guidance what so ever, NOT.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

8 January 2018

I think this thing looks pretty decent. I would choose this over any Audi Q products. But the most important part is how far this comany has come . They are up with the Toyotas and BMWs researching fuel cell cars. Who knows? Fuel cells might be the future. Its all exciting times!

If you don't look back at your car after you parked it, you own the wrong car.

9 January 2018
wheels wrote:

I.... They are up with the Toyotas and BMWs researching fuel cell cars. Who knows? Fuel cells might be the future. Its all exciting times!

BMW dropped Hydrogen as power source around 15 years ago after testing and releasing it (very limited). Last year it even dropped their hydrogen research history from their British website.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

12 January 2018
xxxx wrote:

wheels wrote:

I.... They are up with the Toyotas and BMWs researching fuel cell cars. Who knows? Fuel cells might be the future. Its all exciting times!

BMW dropped Hydrogen as power source around 15 years ago after testing and releasing it (very limited). Last year it even dropped their hydrogen research history from their British website.

 

No. you are wrong. BMW showcased a fuel cell car based on 7 series in 2007. The V12 on that ran on hydrogen. They stopped because the technology advanced to a point where you don't need to combust Hydrogen. Hence they started working with Toyota on the tech given Toyota's 20 year tech know how on fuel cell power. According to business insider UK they intend to release their first fuel cell car by 2020.

Meanwhile let me bring you other cars manufacturers who are researching on hydrogen. Mercedes-Benz ( Daimler as a whole with others having tech ties like Nissan/Renault), Audi H-tron ( Hence VW group), Toyota ( lexus, BMW ), Hyundai ( Kia, Genesis), GM ( with military vehicles), Honda ( tech ties with GM), Pininfarina ( 2.5 mil supercar) , Nikola ( US start up firm), Riversimple Rasa ( welsh start up).

My point was this brings so much excitement to us car lovers. It is survival of the fittest at the end of the day. ATM if you ask me I would buy that Riversimple rasa if what they say is true . 300 odd miles  , under 1300 pounds, zero emissions , as my 3rd/fun car what can go wrong. One cannot simply ignore the fact that a FCEV can be refuelled in less than 5 minutes. 

If you don't look back at your car after you parked it, you own the wrong car.

9 January 2018

looks fine to me.

OK it’s no Ferrari, but what can you do with an SUV? Looks like one of the more stylish to me.

Good on you, Hyundai. I’d like to think battery electric vehicles are the future, but charging rates need to get much faster and, if there’s a limit, hydrogen may well be a good alternative.

Robbo

Aussie Rob - a view from down under

9 January 2018

About hydrogen vs. battery power for electric cars question -- I susepct it comes down to infrastructure costs which makes more sence. It's going to be mighty expensive to beef up electric infrastructure everywhere to a sufficient degree, to enable fast charging stations everywhere -- thus facilitating charging in shorter periods than hours for the large long range batteries coming. But the greater battery capacity the greater amount of current needed. In comparison, if we consider hydrogen as intermediary to power an electric car -- hydrogen could be manufactured near large power stations. Then transported like petrol or diesel to fuel stations where fuelling would require mere minutes. That wouldn't require massive build up of power lines and power stations scattered about the country. Still - hydrogen fuelling stations don't cost nothing. So which is going to prove costlier? Yeah I'm avare of certain inherent inefficiencies through employing hydrogen as intermediary. Effectively hydrogen would require a few central and very powerful powerstations -- then transportation network and comparable infrastructure to petrol/diesel fuelling stations. While the battery electric car taking into account the growing capacity of batteries in the future to meet the range requirements of drivers -- would effectively require an entirely new electric infrastructure either far more robust than currently, or a new network of scattered power production centers that would provide enough juice for the very powerful rapid chargers that would be needed in the future.

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