C-NCAP awards the BYD F5 Suri top marks in safety tests
Darren Moss
16 September 2013

The BYD F5 Suri has been awarded a five-star safety rating in the C-NCAP test, China's equivalent of the Euro-NCAP.

The F5 has also set a new record for home-grown Chinese brands with its score, which has also beaten rivals from Western brands like Ford and Volkswagen

In particular, testers praised the F5's front seatbelt pre-tensioners, front airbags and air curtain. The car also performed well during impacts, with testers noting that the F5 maintained its basic shape with no noticeable deformation to both the A and B pillars.

It is understood that the C-NCAP test is broadly similar to the Euro-NCAP equivalent, although small differences in testing methods are expected. C-NCAP is just one of a number of vehicle testing organisations using the NCAP banner, with similar groups covering Australia and New Zealand with ANCAP, and the Latin NCAP covering Latin America.

BYD says it currently has no plans to bring the F5 to the UK. However, a fleet of BYD E6 electric vehicles are already on trial with several UK fleet operators.

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Comments
17

16 September 2013

I wonder what plans China does have then , as they have the potential to dominate European car sales if they make cars with top rating safety scores.

16 September 2013

The difference, of course, being CNCAP - an organisation entirely UNCONNECTED to EURO-NCAP. Presumably one can just slip CNCAP a thickly stuffed envelope and the Chinese car will sail through the appropriate test. Saves doing all that engineering, with its associated costs, that the Chinese industry looked like it was going to have to do to try and get its vehicles even vaguely compliant. CNCAP is owned and run by CATARC, the Chinese Automotive Technology And Research Centre, so no conflict of interest there, then....

16 September 2013
pauld101 wrote:

Presumably one can just slip CNCAP a thickly stuffed envelope and the Chinese car will sail through the appropriate test.

While you're right about CNCAP being operated by CATARC (and not being a non-profit like EuroNCAP), the testing protocols are publicly available for all to see, so take a look for yourself and then make a judgement maybe?

http://www.c-ncap.org.cn/c-ncap_en/ep/2012english.pdf

16 September 2013

Thanks, indeed, sirwilliam, but I've read it already. Protocols are only one thing. Unfortunately, wining, dining and 'influencing' the appropriate officials is endemic in China. In short, corruption is rife. Even without the corruption element, I'm sure if you type Latin NCAP into your search engine you'll quickly establish the debacle over South American standards of crash performance, particularly with regard to side impact, illustrating the differing standards across the globe. Personally, if I ever have to crash test a car, I'll do it in an EURO-NCAP tested car, thanks. "You've got to ask yourself one question: 'Do I feel lucky?'

16 September 2013
pauld101 wrote:

Thanks, indeed, sirwilliam, but I've read it already. Protocols are only one thing. Unfortunately, wining, dining and 'influencing' the appropriate officials is endemic in China. In short, corruption is rife. Even without the corruption element, I'm sure if you type Latin NCAP into your search engine you'll quickly establish the debacle over South American standards of crash performance, particularly with regard to side impact, illustrating the differing standards across the globe. Personally, if I ever have to crash test a car, I'll do it in an EURO-NCAP tested car, thanks. "You've got to ask yourself one question: 'Do I feel lucky?'

You bordering on stereotyping. The UK government has been and is now just as controlled by private individuals and groups handing over money for control and influence.

16 September 2013

Maybe we can get a Euro NCAP rating soon to sort out the issue.

16 September 2013

Perhaps you should wipe your ar$e and realise that the Chinese people have no more wish to buy an unsafe car than you or I do.

16 September 2013

Presumably this is why western European car firms seem to be doing so well in China?

16 September 2013

you continue to visually examine your rear orifice.

Western car companies are collaborating with Chinese manufacturers. Some are even owned by them, namely Volvo & SAAB are two that spring to mind in addition to what remains of MG Rover and Geely now also owns London Taxi International.

The transformation of Jaguar Land Rover by TATA Group is an example of can be achieved by a company from what some people consider to be a "3rd world" economy.

China will become the world's leading player in car design and manufacturing in time just as they are presently the world's largest market. To suggest they would set up a bogus test organisation to falsify safety standards, belittles your own, seemingly limited intelligence.

17 September 2013

Really!! Surely most six year old children with an interest in cars are aware of the information contained in your second paragraph? With regard to JLR, my understanding is they run a completely 'hands-off' approach, providing only investment funding, so unsure of your point, particularly since India, like China, is one of the oldest civilisations in the world (Taj Mahal construction was started in 1632, I think), so assume your use of inverted commas around 3rd world indicate your lack of knowledge. Third world was coined during the Cold War to describe countries that were not aligned to the West (1st World) or Communism (2nd World). India is therefore 1st World and China is 2nd World. Then you go on to confuse your opinion with fact. You state that "China will become". That is your opinion. Might I also add that it is my opinion that your opinion is based on an absence of knowledge of forecasting, regression or macro-economics. At least if you're going to attempt to play devil's advocate, try to underpin your supposition with facts. If you have to resort to abuse, you've lost it.

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