Currently reading: Bristol Bullet: first pictures ahead of official unveiling
The new Bristol model, the Bullet, has been caught in action ahead of debut next week; has a 4.8-litre BMW V8 engine
Sam Sheehan
News
2 mins read
22 July 2016

The Bristol Bullet has been spotted in full production form ahead of its public unveiling later this month.

SEE THE OFFICIAL BRISTOL BULLET PICTURES HERE

The Bullet name for the production version of the Project Pinnacle concept car was revealed last week, along with a new image featuring the words 'Bristol Cars reborn July 2016' and a reveal date of the 26 July.

That followed the Project Pinnacle concept making an appearance in camouflaged form at this year's Goodwood Festival of Speed.  

We're yet to be given the car’s exact specifications, but we do know it has a naturally aspirated 4.8-litre BMW V8 engine and that its chassis is made from lightweight, carbonfibre composite materials. This is instead of aluminium, which was used on previous Bristols.

The Project Pinnacle was developed in celebration of Bristol's 70th anniversary as a car maker in 2015, and is the first car from the manufacturer since the Fighter sports car, which was on sale from 2004 to 2011.

Although when the Project Pinnacle was first announced there was talk of it being a hybrid, Bristol has chosen to employ a V8. It says this is because this type of engine has become synonymous with its cars over the last 50 years.

The British marque's use of this engine has rekindled a historic partnership with BMW; the first Bristol car, 1947's 400, was based on the BMW 326 and had the BMW 328's engine.

The Project Pinnacle's shapely wings and bonnet intake are reminiscent of old Bristol models, while the 'aero duct' front grille is taken from a Bristol Aeroplane Company engine. The car's looks have been crafted with input from an as-yet unnamed Italian design house. Bristol has previously worked with the likes of Zagato and Bertone.

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Bristol confirmed the Goodwood concept will influence the Bullet, which will most likely make production sometime in the first quarter of 2017.

The 2017 production car is said to be the last Bristol to have a naturally aspirated V8 engine.

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car nut 25 July 2016

Bristol

Looks great but is very similar to a Austin Healey / Sebring kit car, although I guess it will be a great deal more expensive!.
artov 23 July 2016

Similar to a 3000

Nothing wrong with a few hints of a big Healey.
Footloose 23 July 2016

I've probably got rose-tinted glasses on ...

I see the original DNA from Bristols in this, BMW supplied them with the engines for those models. I'd concede the headlamps look a bit small, but if this Bristol does get produced, that's surely better than us losing a British car-maker. I gather that Frazer-Nash has something to do with electric engines, so maybe ... As for the lack of road tests on previous models, Top Gear never tested one because Crook considered Clarkson an 'Idiot etc'.

if LJK Setright was still around, I can well imagine him owning one of these. I wish Bristol and Frazer-Nash the best of luck, rather than just mocking and slagging them off. Bristols have always been fairly quirky cars, but in a different way to that of TVR.

Straff 24 July 2016

Vitriol

Footloose wrote:

I see the original DNA from Bristols in this, BMW supplied them with the engines for those models. I'd concede the headlamps look a bit small, but if this Bristol does get produced, that's surely better than us losing a British car-maker. I gather that Frazer-Nash has something to do with electric engines, so maybe ... As for the lack of road tests on previous models, Top Gear never tested one because Crook considered Clarkson an 'Idiot etc'.

if LJK Setright was still around, I can well imagine him owning one of these. I wish Bristol and Frazer-Nash the best of luck, rather than just mocking and slagging them off. Bristols have always been fairly quirky cars, but in a different way to that of TVR.

Well said, Footloose. I can't afford one (along with 99% of the ones that have made comments on here), don't particularly like the styling and think it's a shame they didn't use an American V8 like the ones in Bristol cars over the last 2-3 decades of the company's life. I would never submit anyone to the sort of vitriol I've seen on here, though. Live and let live. You don't like it? Fair enough, but don't rip into the designer and owners like a pack of blood thirsty hyena. It's British and it's different. Get off their case or go and watch football or boxing. Leave car enthusiasts like Bristol and a few of us that read this forum alone. What on earth is happening to this Country?

abkq 24 July 2016

Straff wrote:

Straff wrote:
Footloose wrote:

Well said, Footloose. I can't afford one (along with 99% of the ones that have made comments on here), don't particularly like the styling and think it's a shame they didn't use an American V8 like the ones in Bristol cars over the last 2-3 decades of the company's life. I would never submit anyone to the sort of vitriol I've seen on here, though. Live and let live. You don't like it? Fair enough, but don't rip into the designer and owners like a pack of blood thirsty hyena. It's British and it's different. Get off their case or go and watch football or boxing. Leave car enthusiasts like Bristol and a few of us that read this forum alone. What on earth is happening to this Country?

Neither science nor art nor technology can move forward without constructive criticism. And Bristol is no protected species. I say 'constructive' criticism because it's of little interest to anyone to say that the design is poor, but opinion should be supplemented by which aspects of the car you find to be wanting and, if possible, suggest alternatives.