Warming worked for the BMW Group for more than 16 years; new role means he will oversee design at reborn brand

Ex-Mini design chief Anders Warming will join Borgward’s board of management for design from the start of 2017.

The 43-year-old Dane, who departed Mini early last month, will head up the design team of Germany’s latest reborn car brand from 1 January next year. He’ll bring with him more than 16 years of experience from BMW, six of which were spent at the helm of Mini.

“The creation of a separate board of management position for design underscores design’s importance for Borgward,” said Ulrich Walker, chairman of Borgward’s board. “I’m delighted that we can fill this position with such an extraordinary and experienced designer as Anders Warming.”

Warming is widely acknowledged as the man who helped BMW-owned Mini craft a premium, luxury image in the automotive market. His proven track record will be called into use at Borgward, where targets to produce three new models each year and sell 1.6 million car sales annually by 2025 have been set.

Currently, Borgward has shown three pre-production SUV models with the first to enter production, the BX7, due later this year in China. The model will then be offered in other emerging markets including Russia, India and South America, before entering the European market in 2017.

Our Verdict

Mini Cooper 5-door hatch

Third-generation Mini hatchback comes with a range of new engines, more equipment and a practical five-door shape, but is it stretching the Mini name too far?

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

Borgward was started in 1919 but folded in 1961 due to financial difficulties. The company was revived last year by its founder’s grandson Christian Borgward and his business partner Karlheinz Knöss, with help from Chinese investors.

Mini is yet to announce who'll be replacing Warming in its head of design role.

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Our Verdict

Mini Cooper 5-door hatch

Third-generation Mini hatchback comes with a range of new engines, more equipment and a practical five-door shape, but is it stretching the Mini name too far?

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week