Currently reading: 2018 Audi TT now exclusively 2.0-litre petrol-powered
Updated two-door gets streamlined engine line-up and more standard kit, as well as a sportier appearance
Sam Sheehan
News
2 mins read
18 July 2018

Audi will drop the lowest-powered petrol and diesel versions of its TT from the line-up when an updated version of the two-door arrives in showrooms at the end of 2018.

In a move that TT product marketing manager Jens Meier said will help to “simplify the range”, the car will come exclusively with the 2.0 TFSI engine.

Although Audi has not officially linked the changes to WLTP, it is thought the more stringent procedure has encouraged the use of the 2.0-litre unit across the range. The 2.0 TDI had also experienced rapidly slowing sales, with the diesel model representing just 16% of the TT's overall UK sales in 2017.

For the 2.0 TSI, three states of tune will be offered, with the first, the 40 TFSI, producing 194bhp, 16bhp more than outgoing 1.8-litre TFSI that features at the bottom of the current TT range. There will also be a 242bhp 45 TFSi, while the TTS (pictured above and below) gets 302bhp, a decrease of 4bhp thanks to the fitment of a new particulate filter.

An Audi spokesman said that the resulting increase in back pressure has helped to boost torque, helping to shave a tenth from the pre-facelift car’s 4.6sec 0-62mph time.

Autocar confidential: Audi e-tron to get a royal reception

Fans of Audi Sport's version of the TT, the TT RS, will rejoice at news that it will stick with the current turbocharged five-cylinder motor. However, this updated performance model isn’t due to arrive until 2019, so we don’t yet know whether WLTP will affect the 394bhp output of its 2.5-litre engine.

Audi TT RS long-term review

Along with its engine line-up changes, the tweaked third-generation TT, for which Britain has the biggest appetite in Europe, also now comes with more standard kit. Offered from the base level are Audi’s Drive Select system and automatic headlights and wipers. There’s also a new sports display for the standard Virtual Cockpit digital instrument cluster.

Aesthetic changes are slim, but there is a new single-frame front grille and larger side air inlets on the bumper. S line models also get more aggressive styling, with new a new front splitter and a wider diffuser at the back.

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The third generation Audi TT
The first generation Audi TT was launched in 1998

Can the juggernaut sports coupé roll on to even greater success, or has Audi's icon lost its edge against more purpose-built machines?

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Audi TT used buying guide

To mark the 20th anniversary of the TT, Audi is adding a special, limited-to-999 units TT 20 Years model to the range (above). It mimics the design and finish of the original TT concept, first shown in 1995, with grey paint, new 19in wheels and a tan leather interior. It will come exclusively with the TFSI 45 engine.

UK prices for the updated TT are yet to be revealed, but the higher-specification base engine and extra standard kit are expected to encourage a rise in price. In Germany, it will cost from €35,000 (about £31,100) in coupé form. The roadster will start from €37,500 (£33,300).

Read more 

Audi TT review 

Audi RS3 review 

Audi A6 review

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TS7 18 July 2018

Audi designate...

... the RS, and S for that matter, as separate model ranges so the statement that the TT will be exclusively a 2.0 litre petrol is correct.

Peter Cavellini 18 July 2018

Looking dated now....?

 My reason, followed one today for a few miles and thought....how could they change the look but keep its TT look So?, well the basic shape hasn’t changed much since the original one, and you can’t really keep trading on looks alone, the “cheat device” thing hasn’t really gone away either, so sticking in three flavours of two litre isn’t going to fool anyone,no, Audi is going to have to give the TT a new body something more up to date, that doesn’t mean tarting it up with parts of the options list like they’ve done with the R8.

FMS 26 December 2018

Peter Cavellini wrote:

Peter Cavellini wrote:

 My reason, followed one today for a few miles and thought....how could they change the look but keep its TT look So?, well the basic shape hasn’t changed much since the original one, and you can’t really keep trading on looks alone, the “cheat device” thing hasn’t really gone away either, so sticking in three flavours of two litre isn’t going to fool anyone,no, Audi is going to have to give the TT a new body something more up to date, that doesn’t mean tarting it up with parts of the options list like they’ve done with the R8.

 

Your views are not only dated before you manage to put them togethr, but also wholly wrong, as Audi sell very respectable numbers of the TT, no more so than in the UK, which is the largest european market. Clear to all who read your tripe, that you have done no homework on this subject and it shows with the many false statements contained in your "piece".

 

Exactly what has the "cheat device" got to do with ANY of the petrol engines, which for this year, make up the sole fueling choice on offer and is the reason for this article, in the first place?.

Mondeal 18 July 2018

For 2018 it will be

For 2018 it will be exclusively 2.0 TFSi as the TTRS will not be released until 2019, so the title is completely correct.

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