The updated Zoe gains new options, including a new range-topping trim level and an engine which offers a 250-mile NEDC range

The Renault Zoe is now available to buy with a 40kW battery, in addition to the 22kW battery offered previously.

Updates to the all-electric Renault supermini also include a new range-topping trim level. The new battery, which joins the existing 22kW battery in the Zoe range, provides an official claimed range of 250 miles, which is around the same as an entry-level Tesla Model S, although Renault reduces this claim to between 186 and 124 miles in real-world driving, depending on the temperature. 

Hot two-seat Renault Zoe e-sport gets 460bhp

The larger battery is available with Dynamique Nav trims and above; this includes the new Signature Nav trim, which has leather upholstery, heated front seats, a Bose sound system, a reversing camera and 16in alloys, as well as added lumbar adjustment for the driver’s seat. The revised model also gets three new exterior paint colours.

Badging for the new Zoe signifies whether the battery is leased or has been bought outright. Cars with with an owner-bought battery get an 'i' before the trim name; for instance, the entry-level leased battery car is badged Expression Nav, but if the battery is owned outright it is badged iExpression Nav. Every Zoe sold also gets a 7kW fast charger with free home installation. The fast charger takes three to four hours to charge a Zoe to full capacity from empty.

Buying the battery outright adds £5000 to the Zoe's entry-level Expression trim price and £5600 to all other spec levels, with the higher price reflecting the larger 40kW battery pack. Leasing the 22kW battery costs from £49 per month with a 4500-mile per year limit to £89 per month for up to 10,500 miles per year, while the larger battery pack costs £59 per month for 4500 annual miles, or up to £110 for an unlimited annual-mileage lease.

The Zoe gets two entry-level prices: £13,995 with a battery lease, or £18,995 when you buy the battery pack outright. Cars with the larger battery pack are also available with a 43kW quick charger, which is a £750 option that allows an 80% charge in just over one hour. The new top-spec Signature model starts at £19,895, or £25,495 with battery purchase. All prices are after the government’s £4500 plug-in car grant has been applied. Dynamique trim, where the new 40kW engine enters the range, is £17,845 with battery lease, or £23,445 outright.

All Zoes get a 7.0in infotainment touchscreen with R-Link2 and TomTom sat-nav, as well as heated electric mirrors, cruise control and Bluetooth. Cars above base-spec Expression come with a one-year subscription to Renault’s ZE Interactive smartphone app, which allows you to access interior temperature controls remotely and schedule charging to coincide with off-peak electricity charges.

Read more: Driving an eRally Renault Zoe - the world's first junior EV rally car

Charge times from the home charger are four hours for the entry-level Expression model and seven hours 25 minutes and eight hours 25 minutes for the standard and quick-charge Zoes respectively.

A Renault spokesman explained the longer home charge time on quick charge models; the new Renault-developed motor replaced a Continental unit, but is not compatible with Renault's quick charge system. As a result of this, quick charge cars today are not fitted with the new motor, hence the slight dip - 230 miles rather than 250 - in range. 

Order books for the updated electric supermini have already opened, with first deliveries expected in January 2017. 

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Comments
6

1 November 2016
First the buy outright option, I've always said people like to know where they are with a purchase and not worry about what happens when it comes to 'selling it on time' etc, obviously Renault too are now beginning to see this reasoning, although you'd have to look at the options very carefully as the buy option would take 8 and a half years to work out cheaper if you did 4,500 miles, but if that mileage was the case an expensive EV might not be the best option anyway. Of course the buy-outright option would be negotiable but the lease option less so.

Secondly luddites are now having to think of something else to have a pop regarding the EV momentum now we're approaching 200 miles in the real world. VW be afraid very afraid.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

1 November 2016
xxxx wrote:

First the buy outright option, I've always said people like to know where they are with a purchase and not worry about what happens when it comes to 'selling it on time' etc, obviously Renault too are now beginning to see this reasoning, although you'd have to look at the options very carefully as the buy option would take 8 and a half years to work out cheaper if you did 4,500 miles, but if that mileage was the case an expensive EV might not be the best option anyway. Of course the buy-outright option would be negotiable but the lease option less so.

Secondly luddites are now having to think of something else to have a pop regarding the EV momentum now we're approaching 200 miles in the real world. VW be afraid very afraid.

If I were to purchase a Zoe with a leased battery, my annual mileage is 10k, the battery lease would be £89 per month or £1068 per annum. That would buy me 1068 divided by 1.13, pence per litre, 945 litres of diesel or 208 gallons which in my Honda Civic at 56 mpg would give me fuel for 11658 miles. Assuming my maths is correct why would I buy an electric car? Also I would have contributed a big part of my fuel bill to taxes to fund the NHS etc something the EV user would of course avoid.
So as a "Luddite" I would actually save money by driving my diesel, a better performing car with a better range that is larger and holds its value better. And that is before having to actually purchase the electricity needed and the inconvenience of regular recharging.

1 November 2016
xxxx wrote:

battery lease would be £89 per month or £1068 per annum. That would buy me 1068 divided by 1.13, pence per litre, 945 litres of diesel or 208 gallons which in my Honda Civic at 56 mpg would give me fuel for 11658 miles.

You also need to add in the electricity at 2p per mile but then have lower service costs, road tax and maybe no congestion charges, which are going to be rolled out to other cities. So all on a knife edge in terms of cost. It wouldn't take much of a swing in fuel and battery prices to move in either direction. It's projected that the EV will stand against ICE without subsidies by 2022. I'm guessing by then the standard range will be 400 km plus with a comprehensive charging infrastructure. In the short term you can buy a Nissan leaf with batteries for £6K.

1 November 2016
Charging is not an inconvenience. Your car is sat doing nothing most of the time anyway. I charge mine at work twice a week.

My annual mileage is around 10,000 a year. For a brand new car and the battery I'm paying the same as what I was paying purely in tax and fuel each month as I was on my 35-40mpg 1.4l petrol car. Charging in a lot of places is still free. I've only ever used the home charger once to check it was working and never paid elsewhere.

If I'd wanted to buy a simialr performing, sized and specced car as the Zoe I'd be looking at another £200 a month plus bigger servicing and ongoing costs. It was a no-brainer.

1 November 2016
Campervan wrote:
xxxx wrote:

First the buy outright option, I've always said people like to know where they are with a purchase and not worry about what happens when it comes to 'selling it on time' etc, obviously Renault too are now beginning to see this reasoning, although you'd have to look at the options very carefully as the buy option would take 8 and a half years to work out cheaper if you did 4,500 miles, but if that mileage was the case an expensive EV might not be the best option anyway. Of course the buy-outright option would be negotiable but the lease option less so.

Secondly luddites are now having to think of something else to have a pop regarding the EV momentum now we're approaching 200 miles in the real world. VW be afraid very afraid.

... Also I would have contributed a big part of my fuel bill to taxes to fund the NHS etc something the EV user would of course avoid.
So as a "Luddite" I would actually save money by driving my diesel, a better performing car with a better range that is larger and holds its value better. And that is before having to actually purchase the electricity needed and the inconvenience of regular recharging.

Which is just as well your diesel tax will go some way to contribute to treat the cases of cancer you've contributed to (see the WHO report if you don't believe me).
Oh and I mentioned about an EV not being the best solution in some cases.
Also, rerun your cases comparing a £23,000 Leaf against a £23,000 Focus 1.6 diesel. But like I say it's horses for courses so don't bother and stick with your inconvenient re-fuelling at Asda.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

1 November 2016
I was looking at the options of buying secondhand. It looks like a nightmare for those on a lease trying to sell as the battery lease prices are the same. I know the maths might make sense but I don't want to buy a secondhand car then pay £80 a month to lease. When these cars are 5 or 6 years old even worse. On the forums it looks like a nightmare one owner quote £1K to hand the battery back which is the only leased part. It will be interesting to see, with battery prices coming down if third party providers enter the market with replacements and upgrades. Looking on Wiki it looks like the batteries are $145 per Kwh for the manufacturers and expected to fall below $100 in the next 5 years. These battery figures don't make sense.

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