New Panamera plug-in hybrid saloon is claimed to mix low CO2 and fuel consumption with high performance; also receives minor facelift

Porsche’s high-performance 410bhp Panamera S E-Hybrid plug-in is set to become an unlikely poster child for green motoring, with a headline-grabbing 91mpg and sub-100g/km CO2 output.

Powered by a new 3.0-litre V6 and an electric motor, the Panamera E-Hybrid has the addition of plug-in charging of its lithium-ion battery pack that is tipped to drop the CO2 output significantly below the current hybrid’s figure, which is 159g/km.

The fuel economy of the new E-Hybrid is said to be 56 per cent better than the old car. Although Porsche is not yet making public its CO2 figure, the Paris show Sport Turismo concept previewed the new powertrain and claimed 80mpg and 82g/km of CO2.

Despite these impressive green numbers, Porsche says the Panamera S E-Hybrid is still capable of 167mph flat out and 0-60mph in 5.2sec, which is over half a second quicker than the old hybrid.

The E-Hybrid’s 3.0-litre V6 is said to be “entirely new”, although further detail on what that means precisely was unavailable.

Pairing a 94bhp electric motor with the 316bhp V6, the new hybrid features a 9.4kWh battery pack — with five times more capacity than the outgoing hybrid’s. The E-Hybrid will use an eight-speed Tiptronic S automatic while the normal models will use Porsche's seven-speed PDK. 

On electric power alone, the E-Hybrid is said to be capable of 83mph and have a realistic range of 11 to 22 miles, although the latter is only likely in highly favourable conditions. Additional features include a high-speed electric coasting mode and an app that allows owners to preheat or cool the car remotely.

Its green powertrain is one of several significant advances that will be announced alongside the facelifted Panamera at the Shanghai motor show later in April. 

A new twin-turbocharged 3.0-litre V6 petrol engine replaces the naturally aspirated 4.8-litre V8 in the Panamera S and 4S. Power is up by 19bhp to 413bhp and torque by 14lb ft to 385lb ft, while fuel economy is said to be improved by a significant 18 per cent.

As uncovered by Autocar last week, much of the focus of the revised Panamera is aimed at smoothing the styling of the rear end. Changes include a wider rear window and pop-up spoiler. Another noticeable tweak is the relocation of the number plate from the rear bodywork to the new bumper, which tidies up the look of the back end.

The changes aren't restricted to the rear of the car, however. The front-end styling has been subtly tweaked, with a more prominent and tighter design, larger front air intakes and optional full-LED headlights.

Other new additions to the Panamera range include a pair of 'Executive' models, available in 4S and Turbo specification. These feature a 15cm longer wheelbase, increasing rear passenger space. All Executive models come with adaptive air suspension as standard.

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Porsche Panamera

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Comments
15

3 April 2013

A very impressive car and also looks a lot better than the original, why didn't they do this in the first place?

3 April 2013

 "Porsche’s high-performance 410bhp Panamera S E-Hybrid plug-in is set to become an unlikely poster child for green motoring, with a headline-grabbing 91mpg and sub-100g/km CO2 output."

 

 This just demonstrates how ridiculously easy it is for car manufacturers to cheat the current EU emisions and fuel consumption testing regime.

 

 

 

I'm a disillusioned former Citroëniste.

3 April 2013

As daft as the headline grabbing stats are, I guess that the current EU testing regime does at least incentivise companies like Porsche to invest in projects like this. I wouldn't agree that it is an "easy" task though and this E-hybrid probably costs hundreds of millions if Euros in development costs, which may or may not be recovered in sales.

And while the EU figures are very misleading, there will be some real world benefits especially given the typical use for these cars (many of which are frequently driven at lowish speeds in and around urban areas).

I think it needs companies like Porsche to be investing heavily and pushing the boundaries, so that mass market hybrids will become better and cheaper.    

I'm sure that we'll get some more typical real world data when the media get to drive it!

3 April 2013

Looks much better, although still not exactly attractive looking. If the next generation model is based on the Sport Turismo, then we may finally have a Panamera which could be associated with the words good looking.

Equally as noteworthy as the hybrid model is the passing of, unless I'm mistaken, Porsche's own V8 in the S models by, I presume, VW Group's generic VR6 unit.

3 April 2013

And do a fully electric Panamera? Like with a bit of weight reduction, some repackaging, and stuffing the floor full of battery packs.

The Sport Turismo concept already looks a lot better than the current model and an electric Panamera would be an interesting competitor to the Tesla Model S. Maybe they could even share the same Supercharger stations, at least once Tesla starts building them in Europe.

3 April 2013

The Panamera defines 'midlife crisis'. Awful looking. Will greying blokes use the '91mpg' as an excuse to justify buying one when the wife asks? It may end up being the 'official' figure, but with idiots driving them it will more likely be half that! 

As Porsche makes more profit per car than other manufacturers, how overpriced will this one be?

 

3 April 2013

Still an incredibly ugly car.

3 April 2013

.......can construe a duckling of an executive saloon with a bucket shaped rear right out of a bucket shaped hat, shore it up with bucket loads of lethal Porsche specific tech and potent character, haul them to some bucket of a port and ship away uncountable bucket loads of this maligned but secretly loved saloon cum stretch hatch, make bucket loads of money and come back for a willy re-do......as the rest of the mortal world yaps away at how fugly the obvious hit of saloon has always been!! Only Porsche can do this. I drive a stonkingly pesky diesel S panamera with a rant of firey mojos, and frankly, oh boy.........everyone else have their work cut out and will be playing more catch up. Awesome stuff from these mavericks; the panamera is an ace !!! 

3 April 2013

This is still the ugliest car ever made, despite the the flattering pictures.

3 April 2013

I'm starting to warm to this. It's distinctive, not boringly derivative, and the revisions help.

Wide cars in a world of narrow.

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