Currently reading: 1.3 million Renault, Nissan diesels cheat emissions, says UK law firm
Harcus Parker launches class action lawsuit claiming 100,000 petrol Qashqais breach emissions limits, alongside 1.3m diesels in UK, but Nissan refutes claims
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3 mins read
23 June 2020

As many as 1.3 million diesel Renault and Nissan vehicles and 100,000 petrol Nissan Qashqais could be fitted with illegal emissions 'defeat devices', a specialist UK law firm has claimed. 

London-based Harcus Parker, which is preparing a class action lawsuit against the two makers, claims a freedom of information request lodged with the Department for Transport (DfT) gave it “previously unseen documents” showing up to 100,000 1.2-litre petrol Nissan Qashqais breach emissions limits by “up to 15 times” in the UK. 

The firm cites independent test data indicating that as many as 700,000 Renault diesel vehicles and 600,000 Nissan vehicles in the UK could be fitted with the unlawful emissions defeat devices. Models affected alongside the Qashqai include the Note, Juke and X-Trail, while on the Renault side, the Clio, Espace, Captur, Megane and Scenic are all named. Cars made between 2009 and 2018 are affected. 

The freedom of information request reveals, it is claimed, that the UK Government attempted to persuade Nissan to recall and fix affected vehicles, but the maker refused to do so.  

In September 2017, the DfT allegedly wrote to Nissan and said: “A petrol Nissan Qashqai was selected for testing this year. We have now completed this testing, and we found that when conducting NEDC tests on a test track and conducting a Real Driving Emissions test, NOx (nitrogen oxide) emissions results were very high for this vehicle."

In 2018, the DfT again said the Qashqai was “not sufficiently well designed to control the NOx in real-world conditions”.

Harcus Parker also claims that Renault and Nissan vehicles running the 1.5 and 1.6-litre diesel engines are among the worst real-world emitters of NOx - worse than both Volkswagen and Mercedes models. 

Both Nissan UK and Renault UK provided a statement to Autocar strongly refuting all allegations by Harcus Parker.

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Nissan said: “Nissan has not and does not employ defeat devices in any of the cars that we make, and all Nissan vehicles fully comply with applicable emissions legislation. 

“The initial report from 2017, which looked at the variation between lab and ‘real world’ conditions, showed variances for most brands involved. It also stated that the Nissan tested complied with all required regulatory limits.”

A Renault spokesman added: "All Renault vehicles are, and always have been, type-approved in accordance with the laws and regulations for all the countries in which they are sold and are not fitted with ‘defeat devices’."

Harcus Parker senior partner Damon Parker said: “For the first time, we have seen evidence that car manufacturers may be cheating emissions tests of petrol as well as diesel vehicles. We have written to Renault and Nissan to seek an explanation for these extraordinary results, but the data suggests that these vehicles, much like some VW and Mercedes cars, know when they are being testing and are on their best behaviour then and only then.” 

The law firm states that customers overpaid for their vehicles, due to the defeat devices being fitted, and are entitled to compensation “in the region of £5000 each”.  It is urging owners of affected vehicles to come forward and join the action. 

It was also involved in class action litigation against Volkswagen in April. In that case, the High Court ruled that the emissions cheating software was in breach of European law. Harcus Parker intends to launch a similar class action case against Mercedes. 

READ MORE:

Nissan found guilty of using diesel emissions defeat device in South Korea

Volkswagen's diesel emissions scandal bill runs to €30bn

The truth about the diesel engine

 

 

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Comments
17

23 June 2020

Great, more bloody cheating. Just injecting a little water drastically reduces NOx on petrols and diesels, pity they didnt spend the cash on fitting water injection rather than paying software engineers to write cheating software.

23 June 2020
A law firm looking for advertising. They need to prove it first.

23 June 2020
Yeah I trust Nissan who just imprisoned Carlos Ghosn because they took him a little too personally. Nissan is about as honest as there lawyers. If your asking me who I believe behind a highly racist company that imprisons anyone that isnt Japanese and an ambulance chasing lawyer, I'll pick popcorn and watch

23 June 2020
Nissan is a highly racist company? Yeah sure it is, seeing as though it's second in command is of Indian origin and head of design is of Columbian origin, for one thing!

As for the whole Carlos Ghosn saga, yes that did back fire on the firm for how it handled it, but lets not forget the guy became deluded in what he wanted for Nissan ie world domination at any cost.
Clearly he'd lost the plot. Greed got the better of him.

23 June 2020

It was only a matter of time before the ambulance chasing law firms got into this. Everyone loves to think they are owed some kind of compensation, and there's always someone trying to take their cut.

23 June 2020

Independent testing had previously shown the diesel Qashquai emitting much, much higher NOX than its official figures. Surely the authorities can get to the bottom of this?

23 June 2020
Reasonable wrote:

It was only a matter of time before the ambulance chasing law firms got into this. Everyone loves to think they are owed some kind of compensation, and there's always someone trying to take their cut.

But if one company/person etc shafts another then compensation IS due, what are you advocating, that companies/people who shaft others are allowed to get away with it ?

23 June 2020

I'm sure most if not all cars sold a few years ago were only designed to pass the relevant official tests. What happens in actual use, at low temperatures, full throttle, high revs, with different fuels etc was beyond the legislation - so it's not surprising there are conditions were emissions levels are breached. Ithought that that was the idea of the RDE (real driving emissions) test, to better establish what happens in the real world - but this test has only recently been introduced and would not have applied in 2017/18.  

23 June 2020
Yes agree, but if the car was programmed to recognise being tested and reduced it's emissions accordingly, just for the test, then that is wrong, however like you say every eventuality can not be taken into consideration on that test and provided the car passes the test without software interference then it has surely done all it needs and no legislation has been breached. Hence the new wltp? Testing regime.

23 June 2020
si73 wrote:

Yes agree, but if the car was programmed to recognise being tested and reduced it's emissions accordingly, just for the test, then that is wrong, however like you say every eventuality can not be taken into consideration on that test and provided the car passes the test without software interference then it has surely done all it needs and no legislation has been breached. Hence the new wltp? Testing regime.

And its being alleged (with proof aparently) that the cars DID indeed recognise they were being tested, so it was wrong, if true.

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