Rolls boss Torsten Müller-Ötvös claims rival firm has 'zero clue' about the upper segment of the car market

Rolls-Royce has claimed that it, and not Aston Martin Lagonda, has created and previewed the future of luxury through a concept car in an escalating war of words between the two companies.

At the Geneva motor show, Aston revealed the Lagonda Vision concept, which previews a radical new electric, autonomous saloon concept that’s due to make production in 2021. Rolls has today said that it came with a concept with that very brief back in 2016: the Vision Next 100, codenamed 103EX

Geneva 2018: Aston Lagonda Vision Concept previews 'radical' electric saloon

“When we revealed 103EX to the world in 2016, Rolls-Royce set the agenda for the future of luxury mobility,” said company chief Torsten Müller-Ötvös. “Since then, it has become clear that other car brands have acknowledged our vision, so much so that they have adopted most aspects, apart from the most visionary and radical. Rolls-Royce’s vision in 2016 was, and remains, all-electric, completely autonomous, completely bespoke mobility – coupled with ultimate luxury.”

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Rolls-Royce Vision Next 100 concept previews the future of luxury (from 2016)

Müller-Ötvös's comments and response follow Aston Martin Lagonda design boss Marek Reichman’s own comments to Autocar on how he views the current state of luxury cars and brands, including Rolls and Bentley

“Rolls-Royce and Bentley are Ancient Greece today,” he told Autocar ahead of the Geneva show. “I worked on the original Phantom. The brief was Buckingham Palace on wheels. It was important to do that to establish it. But the world has changed, and the royals have changed.”

Aston Martin design boss: 'Rolls and Bentley are Ancient Greece today'

Reichman also said “you can’t see Apple or Google executives in a Phantom” but you could in a Lagonda, and that current luxury cars were based around an imperfect package essentially carried over from the days of horse-drawn carriages.

“Look at Rolls-Royce: it’s the most luxurious car in the world,” he said. “Given its roots, its reason for being, it’s essentially still an internal combustion engine to replace a horse, a carriage and a trunk. It’s an imperfect package for luxury.”

Müller-Ötvös also responded to Reichman’s quotes to the Financial Times in an interview at the Geneva motor show.

“They really don’t understand our segment, they really don’t understand the customers,” he said. “They are in a complete different league on pricing, they have zero clue what’s going on in the upper, upper segment – zero. I am sorry to be so blunt.”

Müller-Ötvös added that his company had always had an amicable relationship with Aston, and that he believes the comments were designed to stir interest in the company ahead of a stock market listing.

While Lagonda has production plans, the 103EX does not. However, Müller-Ötvös told the FT: “Rest assured, we are preparing ourselves, once the infrastructure is in place, and we see more and more customers wanting the cars.”

Read more

Geneva 2018: Aston Lagonda Vision Concept previews 'radical' electric saloon

Rolls-Royce Vision Next 100 concept previews the future of luxury (from 2016)

Aston Martin design boss: 'Rolls and Bentley are Ancient Greece today'

Geneva 2018: More ultra-exclusive Rolls-Royce models on the way

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Comments
24

8 March 2018

Still, he looks quite youthful for someone that's been working since 1925. Besides, they're both wrong. If completely autonomous vehicles come to pass, luxury car manufacturer's will struggle to find a market segment, much like Vertu did with mobile phones.

8 March 2018
k12479 wrote:

Still, he looks quite youthful for someone that's been working since 1925. 

 

Just saying that I heard he has at least three blood transfusions per week.   And is never seen outside when its sunny.

 

8 March 2018
k12479 wrote:

Still, he looks quite youthful for someone that's been working since 1925. Besides, they're both wrong. If completely autonomous vehicles come to pass, luxury car manufacturer's will struggle to find a market segment, much like Vertu did with mobile phones.

Completely autonomous vehicles will lead to new heights of luxury, you are completely clueless as well.

8 March 2018
manicm wrote:

Completely autonomous vehicles will lead to new heights of luxury, you are completely clueless as well.

Completely autonomous leads to a pod like device, like the Renault EZ-Go, VW Sedric, etc., not the 21st century Cruella De Vil conveyance or the 70s concept car-meets Lagonda wedge-meets contemporary Korean car design monstrosity shown here. Such a solution leads to a handful of global players dominating against whom niche players cannot hope to compete with on cost, technology or infrastructure.

8 March 2018

Dear Rolls Royce, your card look like they are visually stuck in the past. The Lagonda concept looks like its landed from the future. Think of your products as a Blackberry. Lagonda is aiming to make an IPhone.....

8 March 2018
TStag wrote:

Dear Rolls Royce, your card look like they are visually stuck in the past. The Lagonda concept looks like its landed from the future. Think of your products as a Blackberry. Lagonda is aiming to make an IPhone.....

Says one out of date and archaic manufacturer to another...

8 March 2018

your 103EX is an abomination, the Lagonda is svelte.

Citroëniste.

bol

8 March 2018

I can’t imagine many people born this century aspire to a Rolls Royce. Not sure about Lagonda either, but at least they’ve got a vision. 

8 March 2018

Now now children, play nicely, there’s enough billionaires for everybody. 

9 March 2018

That's the key to their survival, both of them.

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Aston Martin V8 Vantage

The Aston Martin Vantage has an abundance of soul, and decent ability with it

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