Hot hatch gains grunty new 2.0-litre TDI engine with extra 16bhp; has a claimed range of more than 500 miles
James Attwood, digital editor
26 February 2020

The new Volkswagen Golf GTD has been given a major power hike, yet the revamped diesel powertrain is claimed to be one of the cleanest of its type.

First launched in 1984, the GTD is conceived as the long-range ‘endurance athlete’ of Volkswagen's hot hatch family. This latest version of the Mk8 Golf features styling updates to match the new versions of the GTI and GTE and has a claimed range of more than 500 miles.

It's powered by a new version of Volkswagen’s EA288 Evo four-cylinder turbocharged diesel engine, which has been tuned for 197bhp, up from 181bhp in the previous GTD, and 295lb ft of torque.

The revamped engine uses two selective catalytic reduction filters with dual AdBlue injection. Volkswagen claims the system “greatly reduces” NOx emissions over the previous model, although it has yet to give full emissions figures.

Unlike the the GTI, the GTD is offered with only a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic gearbox. It uses the same suspension set-up, with McPherson struts up front and a multi-link system at the rear. It also features Volkswagen's new Vehicle Dynamics Manager system, which controls both the electric differential (XDS) and the adaptive dampers (Dynamic Chassis Control).

The GTD sits 15mm lower to the ground than the standard Golf, plus it features a front axle differential lock and sound actuator. Like all other Mk8 Golf variants, it will be offered only in five-door form.

The GTD’s exterior and interior design tweaks mirror those of the GTI and GTE. All three feature a restyled front grille, a large honeycomb-patterned air intake, a diffuser and a roof spoiler. The GTD also gains a silver light bar across its grille.

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The GTD badging is now all in silver (it's red for the GTI and blue for the GTE), and the car sits on 18in or 19in alloy wheels. The diesel also gains red-painted brake calipers, like the GTI.

As with the regular Mk8 Golf, the interior largely is largely devoid of physical controls, with many functions being moved onto a large 10.25in digital instrument display (which features GTD-only silver display options) and a 10in infotainment touchscreen. It also gains a new sports steering wheel with capacitive touch controls.

Notably, the GTD also gains its own version of the GTI’s famed tartan seat fabric, using grey highlighting on the pattern rather than red.

The GTD is due to go on sale in the summer, with deliveries beginning in the autumn. UK prices are yet to be finalised, but expect an increase from the £24,842 starting price of the previous model.

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Comments
26

27 February 2020

Some my say brave, but to me this move is idiotic. Why invest time, money and people in creating a new diesel car? Only VW could do it.

27 February 2020
soldi wrote:

Some my say brave, but to me this move is idiotic. Why invest time, money and people in creating a new diesel car? Only VW could do it.

Because diesel still has a role to play? And if you can tempt people out of their silly SUVs (I hope and assume there will be a GTD estate) then everyone’s a winner.

27 February 2020
soldi wrote:

Some my say brave, but to me this move is idiotic. Why invest time, money and people in creating a new diesel car? Only VW could do it.

Why idiotic? Why would you leave money on the table if there is a demand and market for diesel? Dieselgate was not their finest moment, but totally stupid VW is not!

It does look like someone sat on the clay model during the design phase!

27 February 2020
soldi wrote:

Some my say brave, but to me this move is idiotic. Why invest time, money and people in creating a new diesel car? Only VW could do it.

Youre talking nonsense - there are plenty or other manufacturers creating new diesel cars. The NOx and particulate problems diesels have were caused by bad legislation by the EU (not strict enough early enough) and some manufacturers cheating, neither are the fault of the engine. And Euro 6d diesels have sorted the NOx and particulate problems, indeed some have lower NOx levels than some petrols. If youre gonna buy ICE, its better to buy an ICE that produces as little CO2 as possible and that means diesel.

27 February 2020
typos1 wrote:
soldi wrote:

Some my say brave, but to me this move is idiotic. Why invest time, money and people in creating a new diesel car? Only VW could do it.

If youre gonna buy ICE, its better to buy an ICE that produces as little CO2 as possible and that means diesel.

How short-sighted. There is no logical reason to buy a diesel car anymore. You can get much lower CO2, NOx and other harmful emissions with any decent hybrid product. You might be inclined to buy a diesel but you’d better be sure you’re happy to keep it for a long while as nobody will buy it from you in the future.

27 February 2020
soldi wrote:

Some my say brave, but to me this move is idiotic. Why invest time, money and people in creating a new diesel car? Only VW could do it.

It may be idiotic if you were making a car just for the UK market with our now constant anti-diesel propaganda being pumped out. However there are many markets in the world where it is still a great option. We often go on holiday to southern Italy. You try finding a public electric charging point there. You would have more chance of finding a needle in a haystack. They will still be using diesel for the next 50 years.

27 February 2020
armstrm wrote:
soldi wrote:

Some my say brave, but to me this move is idiotic. Why invest time, money and people in creating a new diesel car? Only VW could do it.

However there are many markets in the world where it is still a great option.

No there aren’t. You might find a few countries in Europe, but absolutely nowhere else around the world. Don’t agree? Then please give us a few examples of non-European markets for diesel cars.

27 February 2020
soldi wrote:
armstrm wrote:
soldi wrote:

Some my say brave, but to me this move is idiotic. Why invest time, money and people in creating a new diesel car? Only VW could do it.

However there are many markets in the world where it is still a great option.

No there aren’t. You might find a few countries in Europe, but absolutely nowhere else around the world. Don’t agree? Then please give us a few examples of non-European markets for diesel cars.

Sure, Australia, Russia, India, and many parts of Africa. These are all non-European markets.

27 February 2020
armstrm wrote:

Sure, Australia, Russia, India, and many parts of Africa. These are all non-European markets.

You really have no clue what you’re talking about!

28 February 2020
soldi wrote:
armstrm wrote:

Sure, Australia, Russia, India, and many parts of Africa. These are all non-European markets.

You really have no clue what you’re talking about!

And you have even less of a clue. You must think the edge of the world is in Dover. A few years ago the share of diesel power in the Indian car market was 50 percent. It is lower now at around 20 percent. However, given that the population of India is around 2.5 times the size of the EU, it is a large market, and the market for diesel cars in term of numbers is still significant.

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