Currently reading: New Koenigsegg Gemera revealed as 1700bhp four-seat hybrid
Swedish hypercar maker produces its most practical model yet, with a roomy interior and segment-leading performance figures
Felix Page Autocar writer
News
2 mins read
3 March 2020

Koenigsegg has revealed the Gemera as a highly potent four-seater that promises the Swedish firm’s trademark blend of refinement and straight-line pace.

The surprise new model is described as a ‘mega-GT’, and, unlike anything else in Koenigsegg’s line-up, it's claimed to seat four adults comfortably with ample room for luggage. 

Like the brand’s Regera hypercar, the Gemera takes its power from a high-capacity electrified powertrain which promises to push the four-seater from 0-62mph in just 1.9 seconds and onto a top speed of around 250mph. 

The combustion element of the drivetrain comprises a relatively small 2.0-litre, three-cylinder petrol engine. Despite its size, though, it produces an impressive 600bhp and 443lb ft, thanks to a pair of substantial turbochargers and use of innovative ‘free-valve’ technology, which replaces the camshaft with actuators that control the valves.

The engine, nicknamed ‘The Tiny Friendly Giant’ by Koenigsegg, is mated to a trio of high-output electric motors – one for each rear wheel and one mated to the crankshaft - for a combined overall output of 1700bhp, making it one of the most powerful hybrids in production.

The Gemera can operate in pure-electric mode at speeds of up to 186mph, and is claimed to be capable of covering 31 miles before the petrol motor kicks back in.

The company says that, although it can run on conventional petrol, the Gemera is “at least as CO2-neutral as a pure electric car” when using ethanol or CO2-neutral methanol. 

The Gemera’s 3000mm wheelbase allows for a high degree of rolling refinement at high speeds, but the car has also been designed to offer rewarding dynamics while being quick in corners. 

Rear-wheel steering functionality is a feature, allowing for better control at speed and a turning circle that’s claimed to be on a par with that of much smaller vehicles. 

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Although it is unlike anything Koenigsegg has previously produced, the Gemera features a number of styling cues that link it to current and historic models, such as the Regera and Agera. The front end styling, for example, is closely linked to Koenigsegg’s first model, the CC prototype, which evolved into the CC8S production car – one of the most powerful cars of its era. 

The wraparound windscreen, short overhangs and gaping side intakes hint at the car’s performance potential, while full-length scissor doors allow for improved all-round visibility and facilitate ingress and egress. 

The Gemera has been designed to be sold globally, featuring a full airbag system, a suite of advanced driver aids and a crash-resistant central monocoque, but just 300 examples will be produced. Official pricing is yet to be confirmed, but the car is likely to exceed £1 million, given its exclusive status and impressive capabilities.

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Comments
9

3 March 2020

How about it, Autocar?

4 March 2020
Does it have anchor points for a child seat?

3 March 2020

And who else is as entitled to claim that title than Koenissegg. This underdog carmaker has created something which no one will be able to replicate

 

In all fairness, it's time the car world realsied the legend of Koenissegg. I reckon this is the car that will change everyones perceptions

3 March 2020

Nice looking beast, though you'll spend a lot of time at the offlicense topping up the tank.

3 March 2020

 Yep, Koenigsigg has taken the Crown from Lamborghini for most outrageous shape!

4 March 2020
The most relevant feature here is access to the rear seats in the absence of a B pillar.
Forget 4-door coupes which still have a thick and wide B pillar in the way (that seriously reduces visibility), coupes should be back to 2 doors, opening upwards or sliding and no pillar.

4 March 2020

What this article fails to clarify is that the combustion engine actually drives the front wheels!

Check out JWW's video on yt.

4 March 2020

All arabs line up here!

4 March 2020
lambo58 wrote:

All arabs line up here!

Can't afford one? Aww shame. Note the Arabs hold major shares in FCA (read Ferrari) and Merc etc. And now Chinese too.

Once the oil runs out it will be an entirely different matter though. Do note however the Gemera was designed to run on biofuel.

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