BMW’s new executive load-lugger gets improved interior space and is expected to sell more than its saloon sibling in the UK

The new BMW 5 Series Touring is larger and more spacious than its predecessor, but around 100kg lighter.

The car has been revealed at the Geneva motor show today.

The Mercedes-Benz E-Class Estate, Audi A6 Avant and Volvo V90 rival is 36mm longer, 8mm wider and 10mm taller than the outgoing 5 Series Touring and sits on a 7mm longer wheelbase. The increased dimensions mean passengers benefit from more head, shoulder and leg room. BMW says the new model has enough space for three child seats to be fitted across the rear bench.

The new 5 Series Touring’s boot has a 570-litre capacity with the rear seats up and 1700 litres with the seats folded, increases of 10 and 30 litres respectively over the outgoing model. The rear bench has a 40/20/40 split. The car also features a power-operated tailgate as standard, with ‘hands-free’ opening available as an option.

Air suspension is now fitted as standard at the rear axle, a development that means the new 5 Series Touring can carry loads of up to 730kg, an increase of 120kg over its predecessor’s capability.

At launch, the 5 Series Touring will be available with a choice of two diesel engines and two petrol units. A 2.0-litre four-cylinder 520d with 188bhp and 3.0-litre straight six 530d with 261bhp offer claimed fuel economy of 65.7mpg and 53.3mpg respectively. BMW’s xDrive four-wheel drive is an option on the 530d.

The petrol line-up includes the 530i and 540i xDrive. The former uses a 2.0-litre fourcylinder unit with 248bhp and the latter a 335bhp straight six. The 540i xDrive has xDrive as standard and is the quickest derivative at launch. According to BMW, it can dispatch the 0-62mph sprint in 5.1sec.

The 520d comes with a six-speed manual gearbox as standard, but an eightspeed Steptronic automatic is optional. All other models come with the automatic gearbox.

The new 5 Series Touring is offered with the option of dynamic damper control, roll stabilisation and active steering, as well as M Sport suspension on xDrive models.

The cabin will feature the same raft of kit as the 5 Series saloon, including an 8.8in infotainment touchscreen with BMW’s latest iDrive software. The system can be controlled via touch, gesture or voice commands. An inductive phone charging point, Apple CarPlay and a wi-fi hotspot also feature.

Safety kit and driver assist features include collision warning and pedestrian warning with city braking, cross traffic warning, active side collision protection and lane control assistant, which can maintain the car’s path in a motorway or autobahn lane at speeds of up to 130mph.

Sales and marketing boss Ian Robertson said "We know most of our customers are busy and always on the road and really appreciate smooth and connected infotainment. The 5 Series has the most advanced assistance tech in the segment. It is the sportiest [car] as well."

The new 5 Series Touring will go on sale in June, with prices starting from £38,385, £2360 more than the saloon. Like its predecessors, the Touring is expected to outsell the 5 Series saloon in the UK.

Read all the Geneva motor show news

Our Verdict

BMW 5 Series Touring

The BMW 5 Series Touring is a compelling premium estate, offering good space and efficiency, plus decent dynamics

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Comments
22

jer

31 January 2017
What Car. But I've not read a uk review on uk roads. Did it really have to look so similar?

31 January 2017
when a 520i would get you a 2.0litre 6 cylinder, a 525 was a 2.5 and so on, now the 530 i is a 2.0litre 4 cylinder and you have to opt for a 540 to get 6, a 540 used to be 8. Still as long as people are happy.

1 February 2017
It's pretty simple, the 525 is faster than a 520. A 530 is faster than a 525 on so on (can you see the pattern?).

Engine size and cylinder count are really just for insecure business men to help their golf club self esteem.

Test drive a car buy the one you like and dont sorry if someone frowns because it has whatever number of cylinders. Something like 60% of BMW owners didn't have a clue which wheels were driven, let alone know the size of the engine.

1 February 2017
Jon 1972 wrote:

It's pretty simple, the 525 is faster than a 520. A 530 is faster than a 525 on so on (can you see the pattern?).

Engine size and cylinder count are really just for insecure business men to help their golf club self esteem.

Test drive a car buy the one you like and dont sorry if someone frowns because it has whatever number of cylinders. Something like 60% of BMW owners didn't have a clue which wheels were driven, let alone know the size of the engine.

I don't think Citytiger was talking about car park top trumps, merely the naming convention of BMW cars today in regards to what the badge says to what actually is under the bonnet. If it's a 3.0L car, then why not name it 530 as opposed to 540. It worked well for previous years so why did they feel the need to change it

1 February 2017
BMW offers the same engine in different states of tune so if the 318d, 320d and 325d all use the same engine so they can't all be 320d models. As far as I'm aware they only have 3 engine blocks covering 316d,318d,320d,325d,330d,340d.

The BMW (and Merc) system is simple - the bigger the number the more powerful the engine.

1 February 2017
Citytiger wrote:

when a 520i would get you a 2.0litre 6 cylinder, a 525 was a 2.5 and so on, now the 530 i is a 2.0litre 4 cylinder and you have to opt for a 540 to get 6, a 540 used to be 8. Still as long as people are happy.

Yeah, and there used to be a time when Volvo would sell you a 5-cyl diesel and an I6 petrol but that's 'progress' I guess.


1 February 2017
Citytiger wrote:

... now the 530 i is a 2.0litre ...

When turbochargers were first introduced, engine size nolonger indicated performance. So a turbocharged car with a smaller engine will be given the engine-size number that matches the putative non-turbocharged car of equivalent performance.
And then BMW simplified everything by naming the cars at 500cc intervals.

1 February 2017
And the leather looks like cheap tat.

1 February 2017
jason_recliner wrote:

And the leather looks like cheap tat.

Yet still far better than the shiny 70s looking rubbish in the jaguar. Just like the rest of the car.

1 February 2017
jason_recliner wrote:

And the leather looks like cheap tat.

You can tell that from one low resolution photo? In one of the first photo's it going round a corner, can you tell us how it handles?

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

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