Replacement for strong-selling city car is teased in design image; will arrive in showrooms before end of year
10 July 2019

Hyundai's i10 city car is moving into its third generation for 2020, and the first official image of the new car has been released.

Although not confirmed to be an image of the firm's city car, Autocar understands this is the i10 - but we don't yet know if it will debut in Frankfurt in concept form or full production spec.

While only the car's 'floating' C-pillar design is shown in what looks to be a slightly exaggerated digital rendering, we can see the new Volkswagen Up rival's styling will take a step forward from today's six-year-old model.

A prototype spotted a while ago with less disguise on European roads, thought to be the i10, is now in fact believed to be the larger i20. Our reference point for the i10 therefore goes back to images of a heavily disguised mule undergoing winter testing.

That car retained the familiar smaller footprint and upright stance of the outgoing i10 but had significant body cladding, including over the C-pillar, which appears to rise in the same way as the preview image.

Our Verdict

Hyundai i10

Our former city car favourite, the Hyundai i10, is replaced by a more grown-up model

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Details of the interior are yet to be seen, but the Korean manufacturer is expected to boost perceived quality and introduce more advanced technology, including greater connectivity features, wireless smartphone charging and more active safety systems on top-end models.

Interior space isn't likely to increase significantly, because the current i10 is only fractionally shorter than the latest Kia Picanto, with which the new model is expected to share its platform and mechanicals. Engines are expected to include the familiar 1.0-litre three-cylinder and 1.2-litre four-cylinder naturally aspirated petrol units, with a turbocharged 1.0-litre triple likely to make its way over from the range-topping Picanto.

Expect prices to rise slightly to reflect the improvements and changing markets. We'll see more details closer to the i10's unveiling next year.

Read more:

Kia Picanto GT-Line S 1.0 T-GDI 2018 review

Hyundai pick-up expected for 2020, with Kia version to follow

Autocar's Hyundai reviews

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Comments
17

17 January 2019

If a car ever screamed OAP it's an i10 (although Jaguar gives it a good go, although that's a customer problem rather than a design issue). Isn't the entry model meant to hook customers into the brand and get them to trade up?

 

Anyway once the camouflage comes off someone somewhere will get excited about it.

FMS

17 January 2019
SamVimes1972 wrote:

If a car ever screamed OAP it's an i10 (although Jaguar gives it a good go, although that's a customer problem rather than a design issue). Isn't the entry model meant to hook customers into the brand and get them to trade up?

 

Anyway once the camouflage comes off someone somewhere will get excited about it.

 

There is a large and somewhat wealthy seniors population, so what does it matter to you that this new model "screams" and therefore attracts these folks?. Do you not have parents/other relatives, who as far as you are concerned, cannot understand the lure of a hot hatch with oversized wheels/sports suspension?. There are also many driving schools running these cars for obvious (to sensible folks at any rate) reasons and young drivers looking for cheap personal transport to help build up a NCD. You should remove your blinkers and try to understand that the world manages to survive without bending to your will.

10 July 2019
FMS wrote:

SamVimes1972 wrote:

If a car ever screamed OAP it's an i10 (although Jaguar gives it a good go, although that's a customer problem rather than a design issue). Isn't the entry model meant to hook customers into the brand and get them to trade up?

 

Anyway once the camouflage comes off someone somewhere will get excited about it.

 

There is a large and somewhat wealthy seniors population, so what does it matter to you that this new model "screams" and therefore attracts these folks?. Do you not have parents/other relatives, who as far as you are concerned, cannot understand the lure of a hot hatch with oversized wheels/sports suspension?. There are also many driving schools running these cars for obvious (to sensible folks at any rate) reasons and young drivers looking for cheap personal transport to help build up a NCD. You should remove your blinkers and try to understand that the world manages to survive without bending to your will.

 

Only just seeing this reply. No the i10 definitely screams OAP. 

17 January 2019

I've got a current one and I'm far from being an OAP.

It handles / rides well, has loads of space inside for such a small footprint, is nippy, economical, looks good (IMO), is refined (especially on the motorway) and hasn't had anything go wrong in the three and a bit years I've owned it. The five year warranty / breakdown cover and competitive servicing packages are the icing on the cake. For the money I paid (which included a hefty dealer discount) there was nothing that could touch it when I bought it.

I suggested one for my niece and she came out with all the OAP guff. So she paid a fortune for a VW Polo instead, which keeps breaking down, is as slow as a snail and her dealer is rubbish too.

I can't wait for the new one, especially if it features the 1.0 turbo engine like the Picanto GT-Line. Even more exciting would be an i10N version with the full-fat 120 PS turbo engine from the i20.

 

Everyone has a right to an opinion - don't confuse that with insulting your mother :-)

17 January 2019

I don't doubt that there are some folks under 70 driving them and that they are reliable. However your niece proves the point nicely - the Polo may be unreliable and the dealer crap, but she still won't be seen an OAP wagon....

 

FMS

17 January 2019
SamVimes1972 wrote:

I don't doubt that there are some folks under 70 driving them and that they are reliable. However your niece proves the point nicely - the Polo may be unreliable and the dealer crap, but she still won't be seen an OAP wagon....

 

 

So to balance the two choices, what does that say about the niece and her ability to choose form over function and empty her bank account as a result?. Grow up, try to think as an adult.

18 January 2019
SamVimes1972 wrote:

I don't doubt that there are some folks under 70 driving them and that they are reliable. However your niece proves the point nicely - the Polo may be unreliable and the dealer crap, but she still won't be seen an OAP wagon....

 

She will when she's an OAP.

13 June 2019

they should do an N version of it to compete with the up GTI and swift sport.

#IDONTPROOFREAD

13 June 2019

If it's based on the current Picanto running gear, and they offer the 1.0 T-GDi engines, I will be looking forward to a test drive in one.

The only concerns I have are regarding the eventual asking price and the cost of servicing.

I've noticed that Hyundai don't appear to offer the same servicing packages as they used to when I bought mine, and a recent quote for just a 4th year service for my current i10 was £350, which is £51 more than what my servicing package cost that covered the previous three years.

Also, the current i10, which isn't substantially different from the model I have, with the same engine and trim costs just over 22% more than it did 4 years ago too.

But maybe all manufacturers are being greedy and making all the money they can from cars before we're all forced to travel around in automated electric boxes.

 

Everyone has a right to an opinion - don't confuse that with insulting your mother :-)

13 June 2019
gavsmit wrote:

But maybe all manufacturers are being greedy and making all the money they can from cars before we're all forced to travel around in automated electric boxes.

I think thats exactly what they're doing.  Making fewer and fewer versions of models at the bottom of their ranges (eg 3-door versions) because they don't make much profit at that end of the market, but numerous very similar models of SUV (coupes, convertibles) where they can make a lot more money. Manufacturers know their days are numbered as we move towards automation, so they're making hay whilst the sun shines, at the expense of real consumer choice.

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