Volvo's plans for self-driving systems will focus on autopilot for "situations where it’s not really fun to drive"
14 July 2016

Volvo has no plans to introduce fully autonomous cars in urban areas in the future, saying it believes the partial system it is close to bringing to market is preferable. 

“We have no ambition to have a car that could drive in urban environments from A to B,” company CEO Håkan Samuelsson said at the unveiling of the new 40-series concepts recently. “If you’re a normal consumer, is that really what you are dreaming about? We believe more that in a situation where it’s not really fun to drive, you can switch on the autopilot and then sit back and do something else, using that time more productively. That is the product we are developing.”

Volvo will begin a wide-scale trial of its Intellisafe Autopilot next year, with 100 XC90s equipped with the system being driven on Swedish roads. The company also recently announced that it will be testing the system in the UK next year with a smaller programme in London.

While other manufacturers have said drivers will retain at least partial responsibility for anything that happens when the car is in charge, Samuelsson also said Volvo is determined to stand behind its system. “If you want to be in that market, you have to take that liability,” said Samuelsson. “If you’re not ready to do that then you must do something else. Volvo would not market something you can switch on and then relax if it’s not a redundant system which is absolutely safe and secure.” 

Nissan Qashqai previews autonomous tech 

Tesla Model X involved in autopilot-related crash in America

Our Verdict

Volvo XC90
The new Volvo XC90 costs from £45,750

It has big boots to fill and talented rivals to face. Is it up to the task?

Join the debate

Comments
8

14 July 2016
IMHO :)

14 July 2016
Volvo have got this right. Given that safety is the byword of Volvo this sounds like a wise decision.

14 July 2016
Been saying it for a while now and it's nice that a company have finally come out and said "no plans to introduce fully autonomous " - music to my ears. Of course the real reason is a truly autonomous car, in the sense the press and Google spout on about, won't be technical possible for at least another 25 years, it will still be neither be totally autonomous, safe or affordable. So please can the press stop going on and on about it and as to the people who said it will be a solution to the dangers of driving - Goodbye

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

14 July 2016
xxxx wrote:

Been saying it for a while now and it's nice that a company have finally come out and said "no plans to introduce fully autonomous " - music to my ears. Of course the real reason is a truly autonomous car, in the sense the press and Google spout on about, won't be technical possible for at least another 25 years, it will still be neither be totally autonomous, safe or affordable. So please can the press stop going on and on about it and as to the people who said it will be a solution to the dangers of driving - Goodbye

The people who 'rejoice' that a couple of Teslas crashed while in Autopilot mode think that's the end for autonomous cars. It isn't. It's just one of the natural stages. It's actually a great set of data for Tesla every time one of their cars crashes (tragic as a deaath is) and all other Teslas will become safer every time it happens. When a human crashes a car, other humans learn nothing. That's why two million a year a killed.

Remember, plane crashes have never even nearly meant the end of aeroplanes, even when hundreds die all at once. And for every one autonomous car that crashes, tens of thousands of human-driven cars also crash. Humans can't be trusted to drive cars. They can't even be trusted to drive Teslas on Autopilot and obey the rules about keeping their eyes on the road and hands on the wheel. Full and compulsory autonomy is the logical future for cars and these tiny setbacks will make not one jot of difference to that.

14 July 2016
androo wrote:
xxxx wrote:

Been saying it for a while now and it's nice that a company have finally come out and said "no plans to introduce fully autonomous " - music to my ears. Of course the real reason is a truly autonomous car, in the sense the press and Google spout on about, won't be technical possible for at least another 25 years, it will still be neither be totally autonomous, safe or affordable. So please can the press stop going on and on about it and as to the people who said it will be a solution to the dangers of driving - Goodbye

The people who 'rejoice' that a couple of Teslas crashed while in Autopilot mode think that's the end for autonomous cars. It isn't. It's just one of the natural stages. It's actually a great set of data for Tesla every time one of their cars crashes (tragic as a deaath is) and all other Teslas will become safer every time it happens. When a human crashes a car, other humans learn nothing. That's why two million a year a killed.

Remember, plane crashes have never even nearly meant the end of aeroplanes, even when hundreds die all at once. And for every one autonomous car that crashes, tens of thousands of human-driven cars also crash. Humans can't be trusted to drive cars. They can't even be trusted to drive Teslas on Autopilot and obey the rules about keeping their eyes on the road and hands on the wheel. Full and compulsory autonomy is the logical future for cars and these tiny setbacks will make not one jot of difference to that.

How much extra are you willing to pay for a "Full and compulsory autonomy" Ford Focus ??? an extra £15,000 maybe.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

17 July 2016
androo wrote:
xxxx wrote:

Been saying it for a while now and it's nice that a company have finally come out and said "no plans to introduce fully autonomous " - music to my ears. Of course the real reason is a truly autonomous car, in the sense the press and Google spout on about, won't be technical possible for at least another 25 years, it will still be neither be totally autonomous, safe or affordable. So please can the press stop going on and on about it and as to the people who said it will be a solution to the dangers of driving - Goodbye

The people who 'rejoice' that a couple of Teslas crashed while in Autopilot mode think that's the end for autonomous cars. It isn't. It's just one of the natural stages. It's actually a great set of data for Tesla every time one of their cars crashes (tragic as a deaath is) and all other Teslas will become safer every time it happens. When a human crashes a car, other humans learn nothing. That's why two million a year a killed.

Remember, plane crashes have never even nearly meant the end of aeroplanes, even when hundreds die all at once. And for every one autonomous car that crashes, tens of thousands of human-driven cars also crash. Humans can't be trusted to drive cars. They can't even be trusted to drive Teslas on Autopilot and obey the rules about keeping their eyes on the road and hands on the wheel. Full and compulsory autonomy is the logical future for cars and these tiny setbacks will make not one jot of difference to that.

If there were any scintilla of sense to your comment that human beings cannot be trusted to drive cars, it would also be evidence that human beings cannot be trusted to design, build and program autonomous cars and an autonomous road network.

I don't need to put my name here, it's on the left

 

14 July 2016
Great news for us that like driving but hate commuting. However, can I force the car in front into autonomous mode when it's being driven at 38mph along a 60mph A road......?

 

 

 

14 July 2016
Well yes it is actually. But I'm happy to buy one from somebody other than Volvo.

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Lexus LC500
    Car review
    20 October 2017
    Futuristic Lexus LC coupé mixes the latest technology with an old-school atmospheric V8
  • Maserati Levante S GranSport
    First Drive
    20 October 2017
    Get ready to trade in your diesels: Maserati’s luxury SUV finally gets the engine it’s always needed
  • Jaguar XF Sportbrake TDV6
    First Drive
    19 October 2017
    The handsome Jaguar XF Sportbrake exhibits all the hallmarks that makes the saloon great, and with the silky smooth diesel V6 makes it a compelling choice
  • Volkswagen T-Roc TDI
    First Drive
    19 October 2017
    Volkswagen's new compact crossover has the looks, the engineering and the build quality to be a resounding success, but not with this diesel engine
  • BMW M550i
    First Drive
    19 October 2017
    The all-paw M550i is a fast, effortless mile-muncher, but there's a reason why it won't be sold in the UK