Currently reading: Volkswagen faces new fines over 3.0-litre diesel engines
VW could be forced to pay billions of dollars in fines as the troubled car maker looks to settle compensation claims in the US
Darren Moss
News
2 mins read
1 February 2017

Volkswagen will pay at least $1.26 billion (about £1bn) in fines and have to fix or buy back almost 80,000 cars in the US fitted with its 3.0-litre TDI diesel engine.

Court documents filed yesterday evening also revealed Volkswagen could be forced to pay as much as $4.04bn in fines if US regulators don't approve the planned fixes for those engines.

In December last year, Volkswagen agreed to buy back up to 20,000 vehicles and fix another 60,000 fitted with the 3.0-litre diesel engine. The terms of this latest settlement - which has yet to be approved by a US judge - would mean owners who opt to have their vehicles fixed would receive between $7-$16,000 (£5547-£12,680) in compensation. A further $500 would be paid if the fixes Volkswagen proposes affect the performance of the car.

Owners who choose to have Volkswagen buy back their cars will get $7500 on top of the value of their car. Volkswagen previously agreed to buy back up to 475,000 vehicles fitted with its 2.0-litre diesel engine at a cost of up to $10.03 billion.

This settlement is seen as the last major hurdle for Volkswagen as the company looks to move beyond the dieselgate emissions scandal - although it still faces pressure from disgruntled owners for extra compensation, as well as lawsuits from some American states.

Volkswagen, which recently topped Toyota to become the world's largest car maker by sales, has been keen to show in recent months that its realignment and internal restructuring has taken effect. Its recent electric concept cars, the ID and ID Buzz, have shown Volkswagen in a new light, as the company looks to become a technology driven and eco-friendly manufacturer.

Read more - Greed, lies and deception - the Volkswagen dieselgate scandal laid bare

Advertisement
Advertisement

Find an Autocar review

Read our review

Car review

Just how good is the mighty Volkswagen Golf? The seventh generation of Europe's best selling car has been facelifted to keep its nose ahead of its rivals

Join the debate

Comments
21
Add a comment…
Cobnapint 1 February 2017

@Straff

Totally agree. The American justice system goes into bully mode whenever the environment and health is at stake. They'll pummel you into the ground, stand on your neck and only release the pressure when you start to go blue in the face. Which is a bit rich when they all drive around in belching pick-ups and SUVs, move their goods around in belching 18 wheeler trucks, and must be the highest emmiting nation with regard to the airlines. BP were treated disgracefully - for ONE oil leak.
xxxx 2 February 2017

@Cobaprint-One Leak and several deaths

Cobnapint wrote:

Totally agree. The American justice system goes into bully mode whenever the environment and health..... BP were treated disgracefully - for ONE oil leak.

Oh and 11 deaths

Jimbbobw1977 1 February 2017

The VAG emissions scandal

The VAG emissions scandal still runs. Never mind open any car rag and the first couple of pages are for VAG adverts... no wonder the the Polo/Fabia went from being 3* rated cars to 5* money pays....

Before I'm accused of being a VAG hater - we own a VAG car an Audi A3 2.0tsi...

Oh and it's also not been that well built neither...

Straff 1 February 2017

Dear russ13b

Sorry, just because I'm pointing out the seriousness of all this does NOT mean I agree with what's happening. Fines levied on VW and BP are totally over the top

Find an Autocar car review