Number of electric vehicle charging sites has risen above 9000, while 8400 conventional fuel stations remain open
Felix Page Autocar writer
15 August 2019

There are now more electric vehicle (EV) charging stations in the UK than conventional fuel stations, according to data published by Nissan

The Japanese car maker has revealed that as of August, there are 9199 EV charging stations across the country, compared with 8396 fuel stations. 

The UK’s first fuel station was opened exactly 100 years ago at Aldermaston in Berkshire. The number of fuel stations peaked at 37,539 in 1970 but has been in steady decline since, with more than 3000 sites closing between 2000 and 2005. 

EV charging sites, by contrast, are increasing in number rapidly. There were 913 in 2012 but 6699 by 2018, and more than 2000 have been installed so far this year. The current figure of 9199 includes more than 1600 rapid-charging points.

Nissan’s data, based on information from the Energy Institute and Zap Map, shows a notable change in London: while there are now only four fuel stations within the Congestion Charge zone, Transport for London has activated more than 1000 EV charging points in the past year.

The comparison isn't a direct representation of how many vehicles can be filled or charged at any one time, however, because while most fuel stations house at least four pumps, many of the EV charging sites contain only a single charger.

Nissan GB's managing director, Kalyana Sivagnanam, said: “We’ve moved beyond the early concerns of range anxiety, with EVs now exceeding the vast majority of customer’s daily driving needs. The next challenge is for charging infrastructure to keep pace with the number of EVs on the road, and that the experience of recharging is as enjoyable and effortless as that of all-electric driving.”

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The British government recently pledged £2.5 million to provide more charging facilities in residential areas as part of its plan to bring the country's CO2 emissions down to almost zero by 2050. 

Latest industry figures show that demand for EVs increased by 158% in July over the same month in 2018.

Read more

UK government doubles investment in residential charging point scheme​

Battery EV sales hit new peak in July; PHEV struggle continues​

BP Chargemaster activates first 150kW ultra-fast EV chargers

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14

15 August 2019

"and that the experience of recharging is as enjoyable and effortless as that of all-electric driving"

Not if you are 3rd in line and the bloke at the very front wants a full top up taking 45mins, and the woman just in front of you wants a 1 hour charge.

So you look for another one. That one has a queue too, so you go for the third and one of the Automonous Tesla taxi vehicles being hired by the drive is connected to that one. Not by the person who hired it, he doesn't have time to hang about after his "taxi trip" but by a Tesla charge station robot called Gary.

So you look for the next one and then run out of electrons and have to wait for the AA ( battery) division  to rescue you, or just leave your car there and get on the electric tram.

"and that the experience of recharging is as enjoyable and effortless as that of all-electric driving"

He's trying to convince it is all anode and not cathode.  

 

 

15 August 2019

Get with the times.  The apps and satnavs list all working charge points and tell you if they are in use, so no need to queue.  Plus most charging will be done at home.

15 August 2019
Cenuijmu wrote:

"and that the experience of recharging is as enjoyable and effortless as that of all-electric driving"

Not if you are 3rd in line and the bloke at the very front wants a full top up taking 45mins, and the woman just in front of you wants a 1 hour charge.

So you look for another one. That one has a queue too, so you go for the third and one of the Automonous Tesla taxi vehicles being hired by the drive is connected to that one. Not by the person who hired it, he doesn't have time to hang about after his "taxi trip" but by a Tesla charge station robot called Gary.

So you look for the next one and then run out of electrons and have to wait for the AA ( battery) division  to rescue you, or just leave your car there and get on the electric tram.

"and that the experience of recharging is as enjoyable and effortless as that of all-electric driving"

He's trying to convince it is all anode and not cathode.  

Queuing isn't a usually problem in most of the world; the public network only has to cater for the ~10% of charging that isn't done at home. By the time EV uptake is so high that it could be a significant problem, charging speeds will have increased so much as to negate it. You can already recharge 150 miles in ten minutes with a Model 3 LR on the latest Superchargers.

What is a problem is that most non-Tesla charging stations still have only one or two charging units per station. That makes it too easy for the station to be rendered useless by a badly parked combustion-engined car or broken chargepoint. Government needs to legislate on minimum number of charging points per station (particularly on motorways), and reliability thereof.

289

15 August 2019

Congratulations. I think you get the prize Felix for the most disingenuous peice of crap I have ever seen on Autocar's pages.

This is what happens when you reprint word for word some bullshit statement from god knows who without running a sanity check.

The twit from Nissan is referring to single Charging points as 'charging stations'.....Petrol stations generally have 12 or more petrol pumps and of course Motorway services will have 2 or 3 times this number.....so this is a deliberatly written peice of fake news/misrepresentation reprinted by Autocar! Get a grip....oh and as others have stated each of these pumps can 'recharge' a cars petrol tank in 5 minutes....!

15 August 2019

Maybe its different in Yorkshire, but we have loads of EV charging stations, yet i almost never see a car parked at one. (And if there is one, its quite often an old IC car just using the otherwide unused parking space). We keep on being told that the lack of charging staions is what stops people going electric, but not from what i see. Perhaps next years great company car tax give away will get a few more out there?

15 August 2019

How often has that happened to you?

15 August 2019

But like all stats, open to interpretation. Still, it's a sign of progress.

 

15 August 2019

thats 9000 charge points, thats 9000 cars served per hour (being generous) and 8000 petrol stations with a minimum of 4 pumps and say 4 fills per hour each.... thats only 128,000 vehicles served. So only another 120,000 charge stations required......slightly unfair maybe... allow for 50% home charge thats just another 60,000 needed. Whatever the actual statistics are, in reality charge stations must multiply several fold yet before any equivalence can be considered. Lies, damn lies and statistics they say...

15 August 2019

there are less than 250 thousand PHEV/BEV cars on UK roads right now compared to over 30 million ICE cars - less than 1%. So per vehicle EVs appear to be well served with circa 28 PHEV/BEV cars per charging piont compared to circa 500 ICE cars per fuel pump (assuming a more realistic 8 pumps per station). Home charging is another charge point as you note for a large proportion of EVs. The statistics are that the EV charging network is acutally already pretty good - all it has to do is keep developing at a pace that gradually increases with EV uptake over the next 20 years - a few thousand new charge points a year will do it and that doesn't sound to difficult to me.

15 August 2019

the typical EV will require refueling 2 - 4 times more than a petrol/diesel

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