Continued uncertainty and adverse weather conditions hindered output

UK car manufacturing fell for the eighth consecutive month in March, driven by shrinking domestic demand amid continued economic uncertainty.

Car production output in the UK totalled 147,471 units, with the number destined for UK customers 17.7% down on March 2017’s figure.

Export demand fell by 11.9%, dwarfing the 0.8% decline seen in February as demand in several markets dropped.

The latest results mean output for the first quarter of 2018 fell 6.3% compared with the same period in 2017. In total, 440,426 cars left UK production lines, with almost 80% of these exported.

Exports for the first three months of the year were down 4% year on year, but this was dwarfed by the 14.1% decline in UK demand.

Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) CEO Mike Hawes said this continued decrease in output is of “considerable concern”, but that it also highlighted the importance of ensuring more certainty about post-Brexit trading relationships.

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“Maintaining free and frictionless trade is an absolute priority – it has been fundamental to our past success and is key to our future growth,” he said.

Jaguar Land Rover has been the most active of Britain’s car makers in adapting to shrinking demand for new vehicles. It recently confirmed that 1000 agency staff members would not have their contracts renewed.

The recent stormy weather was also labelled by the SMMT as a factor in output reduction, although the UK industry’s decline is not expected to slow any time soon.

SMMT calculations show that the UK car industry represents 10% of the UK’s total gross domestic product. The organisation said that Britain’s vehicle and component manufacturers are responsible for 13% of the country’s exports.

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26 April 2018

Then you'll really see a shrinkage!

 

When Britain is out of Europe those Japanese car plants will no longer serve the purpose they were built here for - to give Japan access to Europe.   First they'll not get new models, with investment being funnelled in to European plants instead, secondly they'll close.   Not only will car production go elsewhere but also the jobs with it.

 

Make no doubt.   Brexit is hurting Britain, and it's about to hurt the British people even harder.

 

26 April 2018

Two things, first of all Brexit isn't about economics, it's about regaining control.  Secondly, if you were correct, why are Japanese companies still investing in Britain post vote?  Toyota has announced the new Auris is to be built in Derbyshire.  Nissan and Honda have announced new builds are to take place here.  So with all respect due to you, what you said is garbage.

26 April 2018

Announcing something is quite different to actually doing it.  How long do you think they'll stay? They don't even know. 

I respecftully submit that you, an armchair expert, have no idea of the outcome untill it actually happens. 

 

26 April 2018
Bazzer wrote:

Two things, first of all Brexit isn't about economics, it's about regaining control.  Secondly, if you were correct, why are Japanese companies still investing in Britain post vote?  Toyota has announced the new Auris is to be built in Derbyshire.  Nissan and Honda have announced new builds are to take place here.  So with all respect due to you, what you said is garbage.

 

Brexit is about giving up your rights and freedoms as a European citizen.  You never lost control of the country, but now you're losing control of your future in Europe.

 

PM May has also offered money to those companies to stay and continue.   Which they will do whilst it suits them, right until they realise it's better to be in Europe than out of it.   Closing these factories won't happen overnight, but they'll establish new ones on the continent and the work will start moving to them until they no longer need the models built in the UK.

 

The UK will still get new work as it takes time to build capacity elsewhere.   But if they've got that capacity in Europe, or want to expand, it the European plants which will gain from the UK's expense.

 

26 April 2018

Again, with all due respect (I'm finding this hard), you're writing more garbage.  Brexit is NOT about giving up your rights and freedoms as a European citizen.  The EU isn't Europe.  14 countries are 'in Europe' but not in the EU.  Secondly, there are no rights to being a European citizen!  Neither are we losing any future in Europe - we will still be in Europe!  No one is towing us out into the Atlantic!

Having the ability to set our own trade tariffs allows us to negotiate with the rest of the world.  My company has to pay a hefty import duty on goods from India, for example.  In the future, we will have the option of importing goods from India, tariff-free, if such a condition can be brought about.  This will mean that we can import goods in a raw state for a LOT less than any country currently in the EU.  Do you understand what that means?  With those goods, we can then add value and re-export them.  We're at the beginning of a brilliant new dawn for British manufacturing, we really are.  It's just that the fatalists won't see it - even when it's explained to them.  I get that you're pro-EU, and that's fine.  But you have to understand what getting out of the EU means - both good AND bad.  At the moment, all you are seeing is bad.  We're going to take a short-term hit, economically, but it will be short-term.

26 April 2018
Bazzer wrote:

Two things, first of all Brexit isn't about economics, it's about regaining control.  Secondly, if you were correct, why are Japanese companies still investing in Britain post vote?  Toyota has announced the new Auris is to be built in Derbyshire.  Nissan and Honda have announced new builds are to take place here.  So with all respect due to you, what you said is garbage.

We never lost any real control. The government just painted that picture by taking credit for EU initiatives (many examples) and blaming the EU for any failures (many examples). We will lose prosperity and political influence, and will have to conform to whatever conditions the Americans, Chinese etc. want, in order to trade with them on worse terms than we had before. We will be a small fish in an enormous pond. Regarding investment decisions, doing nothing is not an option for global car makers and everything Brexit-wise is still vague. Once things are less vague the hurt will truly start. So what was written was not garbage, it was spot on.

Happy motoring

26 April 2018

You must have your own reasons for believing that Britain still had control within the EU, but that is FACTUALLY not the case.  I don't mind discussing the issue of Brexit with anyone, and I respect we all have different views.  But we can't make things up and present them as factual when that are not!

Within the EU, we DO NOT have control over:...

Free movement of people within the EU

An ability to agree free trade

An ability to set our own tariffs

Our judicial system

If you disagree with any of the above then you are simply ignoring facts.  Within the EU, I state again, we do NOT have control of our own destiny within those four areas - four areas crucial to any nation state.  Out of the EU, we will have control again - able to set our own trade rules, immigration, and ultimate legal judgement.  These are facts, rhwilton, not supposition.  This is what the vote was all about.  Frankly I'm astounded that you somehow believe that "We never lost any real control".  What on earth are you talking about?

 

26 April 2018
Symanski wrote:

Make no doubt.   Brexit is hurting Britain, and it's about to hurt the British people even harder.

You obviously haven't seen the unemployment figure dropping over the last 2 years. Still at least you're not going on about the dollar exchange rate anymore (remainers and the BBC have gone a bit quiet on that one )

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

26 April 2018
xxxx wrote:

You obviously haven't seen the unemployment figure dropping over the last 2 years. Still at least you're not going on about the dollar exchange rate anymore (remainers and the BBC have gone a bit quiet on that one )

 

Unemployment rates have been falling in the UK since 2012.   Bit longer than 2 years.

 

And in that time the UK has lost a lot of money with the exchange rates.   We're still not at the levels pre-referendum.

 

But inflation is now much higher, and that inflation figure doesn't account for shrinkflation.   So the true figure is even higher than the 3%.   Wages aren't keeping up either.   Pre-referednum inflation was about 0.6%, much lower than wage increases.

 

So your cost of living is rising faster than your wages can keep up.   Brexit is hurting those at the bottom much harder too.   And just to give you fewer rights and freedoms.

 

26 April 2018
Symanski wrote:

xxxx wrote:

You obviously haven't seen the unemployment figure dropping over the last 2 years. Still at least you're not going on about the dollar exchange rate anymore (remainers and the BBC have gone a bit quiet on that one )

 

Unemployment rates have been falling in the UK since 2012.   Bit longer than 2 years.

 

And in that time the UK has lost a lot of money with the exchange rates.   We're still not at the levels pre-referendum.

 

But inflation is now much higher, and that inflation figure doesn't account for shrinkflation.   So the true figure is even higher than the 3%.   Wages aren't keeping up either.   Pre-referednum inflation was about 0.6%, much lower than wage increases.

So your cost of living is rising faster than your wages can keep up.   Brexit is hurting those at the bottom much harder too.   And just to give you fewer rights and freedoms.

Yep as I've said Unemployment rates have fallen for last 2 years despite the gloomy talk from moaners and haters out there.

Dollar exchange rate is pretty much the same as 2 years ago which is why certain people don't moan about it all the time anymore.

"cost of living is rising faster than your wages can keep up", nope last couple of months that trend (starting before the vote) was reversed.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

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