German engineering firm pushes emissions far below required levels using existing hardware

Bosch has revealed details of new technology that it claims can drastically reduce nitrogen oxide levels in diesel cars, essentially fixing the problem that has caused their recent downturn.

Diesel sales have tumbled in recent months as regulators aim to lower output of NOx, which is associated with respiratory problems in humans in urban environments.

Bosch claims that it has developed a solution that not only reduces NOx output in diesel engines but practically eliminates it so it falls to a point that’s almost a tenth of the next-generation limits.

“We call our system active thermal management because it keeps the most important part of the diesel exhaust, the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system, running at its optimal temperature,” Bosch diesel division development boss Michael Krüger told Autocar.

EGRs work best when they are heated by waste gases to more than 200deg C, but Krüger said this temperature is rarely reached when cars are driven at low revs through urban environments.

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“If you were to coast or not touch the accelerator, the EGR would cool far below its optimum temperature, so NOx levels are higher,” he said. "With our system, the point is to minimise all temperature losses by packaging the EGR as close to the engine as possible.”

By pushing the EGR closer to the engine, the part can be kept closer to 200deg C Celsius for longer, thanks to the heat soak surrounding the engine bay. Bosch’s new system also intelligently manages the movements of gases to ensure only hot gases travel through the EGR.

These processes, which are said to use existing hardware already equipped on modern diesel vehicles, are claimed to trim NOx output to as low as 13mg/km in real-world driving scenarios. This not only far undercuts the current limit of 168mg/km, it also easily beats the next-generation limit of 120mg/km, which comes into force in 2020.

Krüger said this development could prove pivotal in ensuring that car manufacturers meet future CO2 targets. Diesel’s downturn has seen petrol sales increase, in turn driving up average CO2 outputs. He said that diesel therefore remains extremely important as electrification begins to grow.

“We are really taking care of finding the best overall compromise,” he said.

While Bosch doesn’t comment on its customers, it is well known that the firm supplies a large number of the world’s biggest manufacturers, including the Volkswagen Group and Mercedes-Benz – emphasising the impact this new system could have.

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Comments
17

25 April 2018

Yes, and if they'd developed this system earlier, rather than breaking the rules, diesel wouldn't be in the mess it's in now...

25 April 2018
Straff wrote:

Yes, and if they'd developed this system earlier, rather than breaking the rules, diesel wouldn't be in the mess it's in now...

 

What evidence have you got that Bosch were responsible for breaking any rules?

25 April 2018

All we need now is for somebody to find a way of purging the last bits of particulates out that Adblue can't deal with, and LOL - they'll be banning PETROL cars from city centres. Bring it on.

25 April 2018

So what they are saying is EGR's currently don't work much of time. Doesn't that put the whole industry in the dock?

25 April 2018

This development is not enough.

The limit for air pollution from a vehicle's exhaust system should be zero - for all operating situations.

Evaporative emissions should be banned completely.

The next step is to stop air pollution from a vehicle's braking system from being released into the atmosphere.

25 April 2018
max1e6 wrote:

This development is not enough.

The limit for air pollution from a vehicle's exhaust system should be zero - for all operating situations.

Evaporative emissions should be banned completely.

The next step is to stop air pollution from a vehicle's braking system from being released into the atmosphere.

Perhaps we should also have  limit of zero emissions for all humans. Within a few years gasses from your backside will be more noxious than those from any car exhaust.

26 April 2018

At the moment the gases from your mouth are more noxious than any car exhaust.

27 April 2018

Get real man and stop talking crap, there is more Pollution from the common COW than cars.

25 April 2018
What happened to journalistic integrity over the years I do not know. These days you can write a whole news story based on the comments from a company that is at the centre of the Dieselgate. That has paid hundreds of millions of dollars in the US and is under investigation in Germany. Not a mention of all this. Come on Autocar. You can do better. Why so partial? I will buy these claims even from this highly suspect source if they get this past the US authorities. Otherwise it is another trick to fool the consumer back to buying the remaining dirty diesels to shore up the manufacturers sales books while they develop alternative power trains. I'm not singling out any car maker on this occasion. They are all profiting from this farce.

25 April 2018
@Straff "breaking the rules"
@Fadyady "company that is at the centre of the Dieselgate. That has paid hundreds of millions of dollars in the US and is under investigation in Germany"

You may be thinking of VAG. The article is about Bosch.

@Cobnapint "the last bits of particulates out that Adblue can't deal with"

Adblue deals with NOx. DPF deals with particulates.

Electrification is good but it's a partial answer. ICE are here to stay and they have to become cleaner and more efficient. I always argued that it's easier to make Diesel cleaner than it is to make the petrol engine more efficient. Here is proof.

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