Faulty accelerator pedal recall will now extend to Europe; details being finalised
28 January 2010

Toyota’s mass recall of models affected by a sticking accelerator pedal will now extend to Europe.

The problem has previously believed to be isolated to models built and sold in the US, where more than eight million cars have so far been recalled. Details of the European recall will be confirmed later today or tomorrow.

Toyota cuts 750 UK jobs

A Toyota spokesman told Autocar that Toyota was working to resolve the issue as quickly as possible and safety was the firm's primary concern at this moment.

"Recalls are nothing new, but the size and volume of this one ensures it's going to be big news," said the spokesman. "It's important to get this sorted as soon as possible."

Accelerator pedal mechanisms in certain Toyota models have stuck in a depressed position or returned slowly to idle. This has caused several accidents in the US, but an exact number hasn’t been released.

The Wall Street Journal claims Toyota first noticed problems with accelerator pedals in March 2007 in the Tundra pick-up. The problem surfaced again in the December 2008, where faults were discovered in right-hand drive Yaris and Aygo models, both of which are a common sight on UK roads.

The Journal also said a Toyota investigation found condensation from the affected models' heaters had caused friction in the accelerator pedals causing them to stick. From August 2009, Toyota fixed this problem in Europe by lengthening the arm of the friction lever and changing materials on all affected models.

Toyota has so far declined to comment on claims that more than two million European models would need to be recalled to fix the problem.

In a statement, Toyota said: "The details of corrective action and implementation will be communicated directly to customers with vehicles potentially affected. The models and exact number of potentially affected vehicles is under investigation.

"A running change in production using different parts has already been implemented model-by-model in the European production. Therefore there is no need or intention to stop production in Europe.

"Whilst this condition is rare we advise customers who have concerns to contact Toyota GB Customer Relations (0800 1388744) for assistance ahead of the recall instructions being issued."

Yesterday, Toyota suspended sales of eight models sold in the US that have been affected by the problem. Although Toyota maintains this was a voluntary decision, The Detroit News said the decision was required to be taken by law.

Discussing the US recall, Toyota vice president Bob Carter said: “Helping ensure the safety of our customers and restoring confidence in Toyota are very important to our company.

“This action is necessary until a remedy is finalised. We're making every effort to address this situation for our customers as quickly as possible.

Its shares in Japan fell 4.3 per cent yesterday and a further 3.9 per cent today.

“It is still uncertain how this recall problem will affect Toyota's profits,” said Masatoshi Sato, market analyst at Mizuho Investors Securities. “But investors are worried it could really pressure the company's overall earnings."

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Comments
19

28 January 2010

If Toyota survives at all - I think it'll be the Japanese Chrysler, propped up by Jap govt. to save face - many of Toyota UK's engine assembly jobs look to be headed for Poland, or Silesia to be precise:

http://www.toyotapl.com/

28 January 2010

If this included the Aygo does that also mean that the C1 and 107 will be effected to?

28 January 2010

Toyotas (inc Lexus') are probably the best built cars in the world but this recall, on top of other recent ones across the globe, may seriously dent this reputation. Along with other problems within the company, something somewhere has gone drastically wrong for Toyota.

28 January 2010

If you have no information what so ever about the European recall, why do you call it "Massive"? Is this the Sun or Autocar? Really hard to see the difference sometimes...

28 January 2010

TOYOTA ACCELERATOR PEDAL RECALL IN EUROPE


There is a possibility that certain accelerator pedal mechanisms may, in rare instances, mechanically stick in a partially depressed position or return slowly to the idle position.

This is caused because the accelerator pedal mechanisms concerned may become worn. This progressive wear, combined with certain operating and environmental conditions, can cause friction in the mechanism to increase and intermittently result in the accelerator pedal being harder to depress, slow to return or, in the worst case, stick in a partially open position.

In case of occurrence, the driver may notice that the accelerator pedal is progressively harder to depress or is slower to return. A rough or chattered feeling may also be experienced when depressing/releasing the accelerator pedal.

Toyota will implement a recall in Europe for this matter. The details of corrective action and implementation will be communicated directly to customers with vehicles potentially affected.

The models and exact number of potentially affected vehicles is under investigation.

A running change in production using different parts has already been implemented model-by-model in the European production. Therefore there is no need or intention to stop production in Europe.

Whilst this condition is rare we advise customers who have concerns to contact Toyota GB Customer Relations (0800 1388744) for assistance ahead of the recall instructions being issued.

As further information becomes available it will be posted at www.toyota.co.uk

28 January 2010

Scott - any idea why it seems to have taken so long for this action to be taken? The problem appears to have been known about for a while and I think it'd be fair to suggest that Toyota acted pretty slowly in identifying the fault and then sorting out a recall notice. Toyota had an almost perfect reputation for hard-wearing, reliable products and this is not going to help them at all. I know you're head pr person and probably won't kick your own company too hard when it's already down, but it does strike me as similar to the way the U.S Big Three acted from the 70s in to the late 90s with their products undergoing massive recalls for "simple" faults that I have no doubt contributed to the recent downfall of two of those big three.

28 January 2010

It is very sad that people have been injured/killed by these issues world wide but that is mainly down to their lack of quick thinking/natural ability to cope with situations.

With a cable throttle (as they used to be) it was always possible for it to jam due to debris getting under the bonnet/hood of a car.

I have experienced a jammed throttle on a test drive of a VW where packing material had been left tucked at the very back of the footwell where it was out of sight. The pedal got caught under it and up went the revs. This was very easily combatted by dropping the clutch, jamming on the handbrake and 4 way flashers, killing the engine and unhooking the pedal. The guy from the garage was very apologetic and glad that I was driving not him as he would have panicked (at this time I had passed my test 2 weeks before).

These toyota cars did not have brake failure (as a multitude of fords have been recalled for recently) or an inability to turn the engine off and as such could be stopped safely. I feel that Toyota are doing the right thing recalling these vehicles where some manufacturers cover it up and cross their fingers.

28 January 2010

[quote carmadchris]This was very easily combatted by dropping the clutch, jamming on the handbrake and 4 way flashers, killing the engine and unhooking the pedal.[/quote] I believe almost all accidents that occurred were those driving automatics. I'd have thought it'd be easier to control in an auto, but maybe I'm wrong?

28 January 2010

[quote carmadchris]It is very sad that people have been injured/killed by these issues world wide but that is mainly down to their lack of quick thinking/natural ability to cope with situations.[/quote]

tell that to the family of the California cop burnt to death. No, wait, they died with him.

[quote carmadchris]With a cable throttle (as they used to be) it was always possible for it to jam due to debris getting under the bonnet/hood of a car.[/quote]

you do understand these cars and most all cars are 'drive by wire'. no mechanical linkage to the engine?

[quote carmadchris]These toyota cars did not have brake failure (as a multitude of fords have been recalled for recently) or an inability to turn the engine off and as such could be stopped safely. I feel that Toyota are doing the right thing recalling these vehicles where some manufacturers cover it up and cross their fingers.[/quote]

Suggest strongly you quit the Toyota sob/PR story and get on over to a site like autoblog.com, where many, many real Americans will set you straight on 'Toyota are doing the right thing'! Audi burned in the US for their 'Unintended Acceleration' in the 80s, which was later proven to be false, and Toyota should and will burn for this corporate homicide, which will be a cinch for lawyers to prove, once Toyota are forced to divulge all relevant information. This is a huge scandal that will finish Toyota.

28 January 2010

[quote BigEd]

[quote carmadchris]It is very sad that people have been injured/killed by these issues world wide but that is mainly down to their lack of quick thinking/natural ability to cope with situations.[/quote]

tell that to the family of the California cop burnt to death. No, wait, they died with him.

[/quote]

Correct. The guy driving was a member of the Califirnia Highway Patrol, if he couldn't deal with it what hope for the rest of us.

Why has it taken Toyota so long, this family was killed by one of their cars months ago.

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