Nissan believes its dominance with the Qashqai in one of the world's biggest segments shows it can handle the pressure with EVs
19 January 2018

Nissan Europe's sales and marketing boss says the firm isn’t worried by the influx of rivals into the electric vehicle market, pointing to the continued popularity of the Qashqai as proof that it can hold the lead in a market it entered first.

2018 Nissan Leaf review

Nissan’s Leaf was launched in 2010 and is the world’s best-selling pure-electric car but will face tough competition in coming years with most major manufacturers launching battery-powered machines. However, Philippe Saillard told Autocar that the ongoing success of the Qashqai in the face of the rapid proliferation of SUV rivals was proof that Nissan could hold its ground against the competition.

“We invented the crossover concept with the Murano in the USA and the Qashqai in Europe,” said Saillard.

“We created a segment that is killing the traditional C-segment cars and MPVs. I’m not saying we are doing exactly the same thing [with EVs], but we are used to being in a pioneer position with something that is not necessarily conventional.

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“We have an asset [over our rivals in the EV market]: we have the credibility, reliability and technology. Based on that, we should be in a position to keep our leadership in the mind of consumers, and get the benefit of the growing market. All those competitors joining the party will also help us to develop the segment.”

The second-generation Leaf will be followed in 2019 by an upgraded version with a battery with a longer driving range. This version will be aimed at boosting sales in the “critical” US market.

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Comments
12

12 February 2018

In Europe the only real competition is the Bolt which is slightly better in terms of range and speed, there's the Zoe but that's slower, smaller and visually less appealing. The i3 is behind (just) or at best on par with all 3 when compared with the price in mind.

Love to see a full conclusive test of Bolt, Leaf, Zoe, i3 and Model 3 although I don't think the Model 3's for European sale till late 2018.

LEAF, it's a winner but should make hay while the sun shines. 

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

12 February 2018

I was looking forward to the new version of the Leaf, but a recent test by another motoring publication only managed 108 miles worth of range out of it (some way short of the claimed 235 miles).

I'm not stupid enough not to doubt the range claims made by manufacturers (even though we shouldn't have to), but that's blatantly disappointing, and rules this car out compeltely for me.

I know that test was in cold conditions and with the heater on etc, but that's what I do in my current car.

The wait for a realistic electric alternative continues..........

 

Everyone has a right to an opinion - don't confuse that with insulting your mother :-)

12 February 2018

I'd be interested in any review of the LEAF, what mag was it? 

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

12 February 2018

...the car of the year awards edition.

 

Everyone has a right to an opinion - don't confuse that with insulting your mother :-)

12 February 2018
gavsmit wrote:

...the car of the year awards edition.

It did say "chilly weather (3-5deg), which has a big impact on battery performance. It’s safe to say all of these cars would have much longer ranges in the summer".  So expect 110 miles minimum which is still pretty good if it was ragged for Mag. testing in 3 deg from a 40kwh battery.  The extended version will probably get a 60kwh battery and be good for minium 170 miles and maxium 280 in normal conditions. 

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

12 February 2018
So being the co owner of a mk 1.5 zoe ( I take issue with it being called unattractive !) the only issue I have with it is I can't use it for my commute at 80 miles. I seriously thought of the leaf as a replacement for my trusty golf but if the previous poster is correct, if the true range is 103 miles , that's no good ( no fall back range really for jams etc ) . Additionally, why would I spend my hard earned on a car that will be given superior range in less than a year, strange they didn't launch now . Think I will wait .

12 February 2018
108 miles?! Thats embarassing.

12 February 2018
Ubberfrancis44 wrote:

108 miles?! Thats embarassing.

To be fair its about the same as the i3, so its not that embarrassing, and the Leaf is a proper car not an embarrasing fashion statement with dodgy doors, expensive repair bills and spares that needs specialist care. 

12 February 2018

tbf to Nissan, 235 is the result from the flawed, outgoing NEDC test. From what I've seen, they are focusing on the WLTP range of 168, which should be more realistic.

12 February 2018

@Sundym

Can you not charge your Zoe at your workplace? The range of any vehicle is a problem if there's a lack of convenient 'power' source, be it EV, diesel, LPG whatever. 

An EV would work well for me if my workplace, or car space nearby, had easy guaranteed access to a charger. Can't blame lack of range on lack of infra. 

Sulphur Man

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