New deal will see Ricardo deliver engines for 18 new McLaren models as part of company’s Track 25 plan
12 February 2019

McLaren has renewed its contract with engine supplier Ricardo for a third time, securing a powertrain partner to help the supercar maker achieve its Track 25 strategy targets.

UK-based Ricardo has been the sole manufacturer of engines for McLaren since 2011. It has supplied more than 15,000 engines to date, with McLaren's increasing popularity among supercar customers seeing around 5000 delivered in the last year alone.

The engine partnership, with Ricardo building McLaren-designed engines,  began with the McLaren 12C and has included the P1 hybrid hypercar. The two companies’ relationship goes back much further, with Ricardo building the transmission for the original McLaren F1 road car. McLaren’s entire current line-up, including the 720S, 600LT and Senna, uses engines produced under the partnership.

“Ricardo shares McLaren’s passion for exceptional performance, product innovation and quality,” McLaren Automotive CEO Mike Flewitt said of the renewed deal. “We look forward to working with Ricardo and to receiving its full support as we implement our Track 25 business plan.”

The £1.2 billion Track 25 plan will see McLaren introduce 18 new cars by 2025, by which time all of the company’s mainstream models will have made the jump to hybrid power. It will include a successor to the P1, as well as the three-seater Speedtail hyper-GT.

The renewed agreement is the largest in Ricardo’s history, and will see the company invest in its Shoreham assembly facility to allow for greater manufacturing capacity. The expansion will also allow for multiple product lines.

Flewitt told Autocar earlier this year: “Hybrid design is part of the next platform – it is designed-in from day one rather than having to adapt an existing chassis.”

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McLaren 600LT 2018 review - hero front

Lighter, faster and more athletic than the already brilliant 570S, the 600LT is McLaren at its very best

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Current McLaren models use a twin-turbocharged V8 engine, while a future hybrid powertrain could move to a smaller-capacity turbocharged V6. However, McLaren has said that future limited-production hypercars might still remain powered solely by internal combustion engines.

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Comments
22

12 February 2019

so 3 new models a year then, no wonder their F1 program is so dire

12 February 2019
xxxx wrote:

so 3 new models a year then, no wonder their F1 program is so dire

 

**YAWN**

 

The Car production side had nothing to do with the F1 side, they are two distictly different companies.......... 

13 February 2019
jonboy4969 wrote:

xxxx wrote:

so 3 new models a year then, no wonder their F1 program is so dire

 

**YAWN**

 

The Car production side had nothing to do with the F1 side, they are two distictly different companies.......... 

Under the McLaren Group (F1 team is a subsiduary of the group), which both 'develop' from the same location and almost certainly share engineering and staff.

13 February 2019
xxxx wrote:

jonboy4969 wrote:

xxxx wrote:

so 3 new models a year then, no wonder their F1 program is so dire

 

**YAWN**

 

The Car production side had nothing to do with the F1 side, they are two distictly different companies.......... 

Under the McLaren Group (F1 team is a subsiduary of the group), which both 'develop' from the same location and almost certainly share engineering and staff.

 

Jonboy is right. Not so much as Rolls Royce engines and Rolls Royce cars but two different companies. meaning budget/staff/etc will be independent. 

13 February 2019

No, they are not.

13 February 2019

They've done an outstanding job so far.

12 February 2019

All models on hybrid power? Now don't lets be hasty lads, how about half?

12 February 2019

Although I think that the sheer amount of new models is overkill there's no doubting just how excellent they are. 

Maybe it's the pace of their product development that's making Ferrari's lack of new models seem strange. I can only think that the Italians have a few surprises up their sleeves...

12 February 2019
It's like Mugatu pointed out about Derek Zoolander, they're all the same car, doesn't anyone else notice? It feels like I'm taking crazy pills.

Ferrari might only have four different cars. But that's still three more than McLaren.

13 February 2019
Slowmo wrote:

It's like Mugatu pointed out about Derek Zoolander, they're all the same car, doesn't anyone else notice? It feels like I'm taking crazy pills. Ferrari might only have four different cars. But that's still three more than McLaren.

 

Great comment, now we know you know Jack sPit about cars. 

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