Currently reading: Lotus partners with energy firm to 'redesign' EV ownership
Lotus teams up with British Gas owner for vehicle-to-grid charging scheme and infrastructure network
James Attwood, digital editor
News
2 mins read
11 May 2020

Lotus will partner with British Gas parent company Centrica to develop a “new model” that they claim will “redesign” electric vehicle (EV) ownership.

The Norfolk-based marque, which is owned by Chinese company Geely, is gearing up to launch the Evija electric hypercar later this year.

It says the new partnership will lead to “a dedicated Lotus energy strategy and the development of a charging infrastructure for future customers. It will also form a core part in helping Lotus reach net zero carbon emissions, part of its Vision80 strategy."

Lotus and Centrica will work together to develop what they call a flexible platform that “fully integrates future mobility and energy” by “making the car an extension of the home". While no specific details have been given, it will involve using Lotus EVs for home-based vehicle-to-grid charging, where energy stored in the car’s battery can be fed into the gris while it is plugged in.

The firms will also team up to establish “a new global charging and energy infrastructure for new products”. It hasn't been specified if any resulting charging infrastructure will be an open system or exclusive to Lotus models in a similar fashion to Tesla’s Supercharger network.

Centrica will also help Lotus to develop a sustainability programme based on the use of low-carbon technologies to help reduce the car maker’s carbon emissions.

Lotus boss Phil Popham said: “Our journey to net-zero carbon is absolutely lock-in-step with the Vision80 strategy for Lotus – taking us to eighty years of the business in 2028. By then, we will have transformed Lotus into a truly global player in the high-performance, high-technology sector.”

He added: “The difference is the energy and infrastructure that will power and support these products in the future. This new partnership demonstrates the progress being made and the ambition of our vision.”

READ MORE

Lotus Evija hypercar: new configurator video of EV

Advertisement
Advertisement

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Ford Kuga 2020 road test review - hero front
    3 July 2020
    Car review
    SUV practicality, Focus underpinnings, plug-in hybrid tech: is this another...
  • Alpina B3 2020 first drive review - hero front
    3 July 2020
    First Drive
    Bavaria's alternative M3 gets an added injection of performance and...
  • Hyundai i30 N 2020 UK first drive review - hero front
    2 July 2020
    First Drive
    Suspension tweaks aim to make the Hyundai hot hatch a more usable daily...

Join the debate

Comments
5

11 May 2020

Surely using a million pound hypercar to power your home when it's idle is a bit of a nonsense? 

But in all seriousness it does seem silly for all EV manufacturers to be going their own way and forming partnerships with energy firms to develop such systems. I'd like to see  vehicle to grid developed as a national system with standard charging charging systems for all EVs. Just imagine the problems we would have if conventional cars had to be supplied with different fuels and sevice stations for different car brands?   

Done properly, vehicle to grid could provide an addition reason for electric car ownership, with the car serving a useful purpose at the end of every journey not just lying idle. 

11 May 2020
LP in Brighton wrote:

But in all seriousness it does seem silly for all EV manufacturers to be going their own way and forming partnerships with energy firms to develop such systems.

I agree, you'd think lessons would be learnt by now, but I suppose each player tries to steal a march on the competition and go it alone instead of collaborating. 

In the early days of electricity before the national grid was created, if you needed to operate a piece of electrical equipment in different parts of the country, you needed a huge adaptor box with umpteen different plugs - infinitely more cumbersome than the adaptors we have to take to the continent!

Then there was the VHS/Betamax video debacle, followed by mobile phones whose reception in certain areas depended on which network you subscribed to.

In the latter case, as with EV charging networks, the government should have stepped in to encourage some sort of standardisation and integration right from the start.  But that seems to be too much to ask of any government!

11 May 2020

I thought some of this was behind having smart meters in your home? Using EV batteries to meet demand at peak periods, or provide backup when wind turbines or PV panels are not producing energy, or storage when the grid is under utilised/has excess capacity 

Concept is interesting and government lead strategy would/could do much to ensure we move forward in a coherent way. Much also depends on the vehicle actually being plugged in and accessible to the grid, car manufacturers and the public want reduced plug in time and longer range, witness PHEV's that are never plugged in.

Lockdown has proved that almost anything is possible and with Brexit on the horizon, timing is right for some radical gamechanging decisions to be made. Boris just needs to back-up his words up with actions.     

 

   

11 May 2020

Well, seeing as Centrica have been ripping off the British public with p8*ss taking gas prices for 20+ years, they should have a big development budget !

11 May 2020

it has to be open, Lotus simply don't sell enough vehicles to make a closed system a consideration. Given a few years, I don't see how Tesla would want a closed system either, I'm expecting them to spin charging off as a seperate concern and have it open to all manufacturers. Companies having their own closed systems is what's making the whole thing such a mess of non-standardisation that needs sorting out, along with the payment systems.

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Ford Kuga 2020 road test review - hero front
    3 July 2020
    Car review
    SUV practicality, Focus underpinnings, plug-in hybrid tech: is this another...
  • Alpina B3 2020 first drive review - hero front
    3 July 2020
    First Drive
    Bavaria's alternative M3 gets an added injection of performance and...
  • Hyundai i30 N 2020 UK first drive review - hero front
    2 July 2020
    First Drive
    Suspension tweaks aim to make the Hyundai hot hatch a more usable daily...