Land Rover is 'exploring' plans to build the Defender outside the European Union, ahead of a planned ending of production in the UK at the end of 2015
7 January 2015

Land Rover’s iconic Defender could live on overseas after production in the UK ends later this year. However, any future production of the rugged off-roader would not officially find its way back to EU markets.

According to a company statement, Land Rover is "investigating the possibility of maintaining production of the current Defender at an overseas production facility, after the close of UK manufacturing. Any continuation would see low-volume production maintained for sale outside the EU".

There are no hints as to where the Defender could live on, although India – home country of JLR owners Tata – looks like the leading contender. Defender production has a very high labour content and the lower labour costs in India would bring the cost of producing the vehicle down significantly.

The semi hand-made nature of Defender production would also, presumably, allow any newly constructed production line to be relatively inexpensive because of minimal robotisation.

Land Rover sources say that if the Defender does live on overseas, it is not the company’s intention to offer the model in the EU in any shape or form, even if some kind of single-vehicle type approval could theoretically allow the new-build Defenders to be made road legal.

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Land Rover Defender

The Land Rover Defender is an institution and unbeatable off road, if crude on it

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Comments
8

7 January 2015
That they are outdated, thirsty, offer little protection in a crash, offer no protection to pedestrians??? So, they are deemed unsuitable for Europeans but potentially ok for the people in India. Seems a bit wrong to me how life is valued differently throughout the world. Unless these things can be addressed, I say put the old nag out its misery.

7 January 2015
Beastie_Boy wrote:

offer little protection in a crash, offer no protection to pedestrians??? So, they are deemed unsuitable for Europeans but potentially ok for the people in India. Seems a bit wrong to me how life is valued differently throughout the world.

Fully agree. If its unsuitable to be sold to human beings, then stop. Very surprised that JLR came out with this PR gaff.

7 January 2015
Off road is where the Defender excels. I've been fortunate enough to have needed one of these in the past for working off-road. It's more basic construction means that it can be repaired, unlike many of the newer SUVs. Don't confuse school-run SUVs with a proper 4x4! It's not a car; it's a working tool.

289

7 January 2015
Quite right Symanski.

The Land Rover Defender, is a mildly civilised (over time) tractor. Tractors don't have good crash protection or great pedestrian safety rating either.
The problem comes when they are used in environment's they are not suited to...not to mention increasing power or engine transplants.
These old tubs are perfectly OK wobbling around country lanes towing stock transporters or delivering feed to the animals. They are not suitable for city or motorway work. End of.

289

7 January 2015
Quite right Symanski.

The Land Rover Defender, is a mildly civilised (over time) tractor. Tractors don't have good crash protection or great pedestrian safety rating either.
The problem comes when they are used in environment's they are not suited to...not to mention increasing power or engine transplants.
These old tubs are perfectly OK wobbling around country lanes towing stock transporters or delivering feed to the animals. They are not suitable for city or motorway work. End of.

7 January 2015
They chucked the Australian body tools into the harbour, Spanish tooling came to the UK but there is a full set of Series tools in Iran....

Robots and Defenders - that'll never happen....

24 January 2015
Copied from AUTOCAR magazine’s letter page (21 January 2015) . . .

“. . . the one key factor that distinguishes Land Rover from other makes . . (is that) . . unlike all other manufacturers, Land Rover’s halo car is not at the top of the range but at the bottom. The Defender shows that the whole range is - at its heart - based on a real, no-nonsense, no-frills, tough, go-anywhere, do-anything, vehicle.

Without the Defender, Land Rover would be no more than any other maker of SUVs, whose main purpose in life is to make the right impression at the school gates and in the golf club car park,

Roderick W Ramage. Stafford.”

. . . an explanation as precise and succinct as it could be !!

17 April 2015
I lived in the Middle East for 10 years from 1995-2005 and the Toyota Landcruiser had taken over as the Offroader [I hate the term SUV[ of choice.I had a Disco Mark 1 and it ,too was good,very few niggling issues, but most of my Expat colleagues preferred the LC or Nissan's huge Patrol.The smaller version ,proven beyond doubt my Jeremy and the lads at TG is the Hilux,just unbreakable. Sadly we only get the watered down Tacoma here in NA.

Madmac

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