Despite concerns about air pollution, diesel is set to account for 70% of JLR's UK sales annually

Diesel engines will continue to make-up the bulk of engines powering Jaguar Land Rover vehicles in the future, despite pressure from lobbyists concerned about air pollution.

Speaking at a business briefing in the Midlands, JLR’s UK managing director Jeremy Hicks, forecast a continuing significant importance of diesel engines, which power 70 per cent of JLR’s UK sales, equivalent to around 70,000 new cars a year.

“I am not convinced that we’ll see a wholesale change away from diesel. And we are certainly not seeing any marked shift away from diesel today,’ said Hicks.

VW’s boss Paul Willis recently predicted a possible drop in the UK diesel mix to as low as 30 per cent, driven by air pollution worries. It is currently 55 per cent, a growing percentage driven by CO2-based road tax and company car taxation. 

A bigger mix of diesels is also a by-product of JLR’s successful push to increase sales with fleet customers, whose buying decisions are driven strongly by CO2 figures.

JLR has increased its proportion of fleet sales from 37 per cent in 2013 to 44 per cent last year and is expecting a further shift, over the next couple of years of several percentage points, towards the industry average of 46 per cent.

‘We’re catching-up, because we’ve always been dominated by retail sales. But now we’ve addressed whole life running cost issues, helped by the new Ingenium engines, which are giving us CO2 figures like 110g/km in the Range Rover Evoque,’ says Hicks.

JLR is also committed to diesel-hybrids, a powertrain that suits its product mix of large luxury cars and SUVs.

However, a new family of four-cylinder petrol-engined hybrids is on the way, which  could power the smaller vehicles in its range, like the Jaguar XE, RR Evoque and LR Discovery Sport.

JLR is close to starting series of production of the petrol-engined version of the all-new four-cylinder alloy-blocked Ingenium engine.

Code-named AJ200, the petrol version of the Ingenium two-litre is in pilot build at JLR’s new engine plant at Wolverhampton in a new assembly hall alongside the diesel line, which can build 1200 engines a day.

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35

3 June 2016
Just as well nobody looks to JLR for any kind of leadership. No doubt they will change their tune when their hybrids become available, but for the moment conventional technology is all they have to sell so no surprise that they push it. Meanwhile Volvo, BMW, Audi and Lexus offer products that help reduce the risk to people's health.

3 June 2016
Is he proud of the fact that his company will continue to do this, despite environmental concerns?

3 June 2016
Wow 2 very judgemental comments already. Let's just ignore the facts shall we?

JLR have already hired capacity at an Austrian Car manufacturing plant to produce their first electric SUV within the next 12 to 18 months! They are actually working on 2 electric SUVs one is a Jaguar the other a Land Rover. They are even rumoured to be in talks with Coventry Council to build a new car factory in the city to make electric cars in the UK.

Their Diesel engines are some of the best in class. And frankly they are right to believe diesel won't disappear quickly. If I were buying a car right now I wouldn't go electric because the recharge times are too slow for me.

And just in case that isn't good enough they are making new petrol engines. Oh and also said to be designing a straight 6 and 3 cylinder engine.

I get a distinct impression that some people who comment on here work for German car makers who are increasingly seeing sales move across to JLR. There is a reason that JLR is one of the only car makers in the world that are running their plants 24 hrs a day, 7 days a week and are now the biggest car maker in the UK.

Yes they can improve, BMWs I drive system is better than the JLR equivalent. But JLR are going in the right direction.l and frankly if you want the ultimate driving machine then Jaguar are making some of the best out there!

3 June 2016
TStag wrote:

Their Diesel engines are some of the best in class.

The Ingenium diesel, despite the hype, is average at best, and the 3.0D and the 4.4D engines are Ford/PSA engines, built by Ford in Dagenham.

3 June 2016
Btw would anyone seriously spec an SUV in petrol form? Nah didn't think so...

3 June 2016
There is an easy answer to that - don't buy an SUV. Unless you go off road or tow, buying one is a moronic decision.

3 June 2016
TStag wrote:

Btw would anyone seriously spec an SUV in petrol form? Nah didn't think so...

Possibly not in the UK or even the EU, but lots do in PHEV/Petrol form, and there are other markets that dont like diesel.

3 June 2016
TStag wrote:

Btw would anyone seriously spec an SUV in petrol form? Nah didn't think so...

Errr...America? Huuuge SUV market.
JLR being a little foolish with this quote. They flirt with hybrids and small-capacity stuff (CXconcept?) than do diddly-squat in production. Not a very progressive tech company, compared to the Germans and Japanese.

3 June 2016
Lexus comfortably outsells Jaguar without a single diesel on offer. It's also very admirable that they take such a hardline approach for the sake of everyone's health (well, probably more so they don't have to invest in another massively expensive research programme, but whatever). Sad to see other manufacturers not following suit. Particularly Jaguar - my last diesel from them was a piece of shit thanks to the particulate filter and EGR, forcing me out of the brand, but I'd have had a hybrid or electric XF like a shot if they'd offered it last generation.

3 June 2016
Part of the issue here is that the UK mix might be more in favour of petrol if LR gave us the chance to buy petrol powered cars. I am on my second full sized Discovery - brilliant cars - but there is only one engine choice in the UK, a diesel. I would happily buy the petrol V6 which they sell in export markets but refuse to offer in the UK.

So the stats suit the story but possibly for the wrong reason on some cases.

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