Jaguar's Adrian Hallmark tells Autocar why his brand will not only survive, but thrive too thanks to its new model offensive
Matt Burt
15 October 2013

Jaguar has already revealed its plans to launch four new models by 2018. A new compact saloon, estate, SUV and coupe will be revealed within the next five years, completing a strong model offensive which will also see a new version of the Range Rover Evoque go on sale, dubbed the Evoque XL.

Here, brand chief Adrian Hallmark tells Autocar about his plans for the future.

On rebuilding the brand 

“If you’re a Jaguar aficionado, the brand has very strong values. If you’re not, it doesn’t. We can fill that void. If you compared it with Audi, BMW or Mercedes-Benz, the brand Jaguar is absolutely seen as a prestige brand globally, wherever you go. But below that, it starts to get a bit ‘not sure what’s next’. We’re trying to fill the ‘what’s next’ with technology stories like the new iQ[Al] platform and the C-X17.

“Jaguar is very strong in two dimensions: design and prestige. Chinese customers don’t know the history of Jaguar, they don’t know our technology and they don’t understand everything that we understand in the UK because they’ve not been exposed to it, so that’s an open book. And to present this architecture, the saloon and this SUV concept as a vision of what else we can do starts to build a much more rounded, high-tech, modern, progressive picture.”

On a product-led revival

“It’s a three-phase approach. There was fixing the basics, which we did with XK, XF and XJ. Then we saw new engines, all-wheel drive, the Sportbrakes, R versions — you name it. That has already yielded 40 per cent growth.

“But the real change for Jaguar comes when we launch new products into new segments. F-type was a little boost to that because the sports car segment is tiny, but from an image perspective, it is a quantum leap. It absolutely gets Jaguar back on to the screensavers and bedroom walls of the young.

“We do have mules [for the compact Jaguar] being tested. The new engine factory that we’ve already communicated and that new engine family, they are being prototyped like crazy and the durability testing; refinement and efficiency are being optimised as we speak. It’s all guns blazing in the development process and we’re ready for launch in 2015.

“The volume potential for that one car is greater than the entire Jaguar range last year. So by 2015, that one car, in terms of transformational effect, should be worth more in volume terms than the entire Jaguar sales globally last year. F-type does it from an image point of view, but the saloon car is really the lever to transform the size of the company.” 

On Jaguar’s all-new aluminium architecture

“It’s not about changing the image as much as rebasing it in what Jaguar stands for. When we’re at our best, we build the best-looking, the fastest and most engaging and the most high-tech cars in the world. F-type is the symbol of all of those three things. This iQ[Al] architecture is now the foundation for the third phase of our development.

“With this system, we’ve already planned for rear-wheel drive, all-wheel drive, diesel, petrol, hybrids. But not full electric; you could, but for a full electric vehicle you’re better off with a full electric system. But for everything apart from a pure battery vehicle, we’ve got it covered. V6, even a V8, we can get in. Four-cylinder, three-cylinder, hybrid, two-wheel drive, four-wheel drive… we can do it all.”

On taking on the Germans

“We don’t intend to compete head to head. The first thing I’d say is a bit of sober aspiration. We want to change the vocabulary, from ‘the German three’ to ‘the European four’. That’s point one. 

“Point two is that we have a long, long way to go to be able to compete with them, but from a product perspective we will build the most advanced, the most efficient, the most refined car in that segment. Not almost as good as, but better than the best in the world. 

“It won’t be the cheapest in the segment, but it won’t be the most expensive, either. But it will look and drive like a Jaguar, be filled with the highest technology that anybody has ever brought to that segment, have the most efficient engines and the most refined feel in the segment.”

On a Jaguar SUV

“Does it rankle with our core values? Maybe, a little bit. Does it rankle more than a diesel X-type estate car? I don’t think so. If you look at the premium products from premium brands out there today, they no longer conform to whatever they did 20, 50 or 100 years ago. The C-X17 should ignite in people’s minds the fact that Jaguar is not just some dormant historic brand that is great at saloons and the odd sports car, but actually it could be imagined as a modern premium brand.”

On transforming Jaguar

“We won’t transform Jaguar in a year. In the past three years we’ve made a bit of difference, but it takes five, 10, 15 years to truly leverage and change a brand. With continued commitment on investment, with the right products and technologies, absolutely we can be a global number four and part of the European four, and that’s the mission.”

On using social media

“As well as launching cars, we’ve got to constantly push the boundaries in terms of getting people to talk about the brand in a positive way. Because you don’t see many Jaguars on the road, it is an exciting story to get the familiarity and the awareness that we need. We’ve just got to be on it the whole time and the C-X17 absolutely turbocharges that process and we’re measuring it very closely.

“With social media feedback, we can understand how the brand resonates and how people see us, and how they see this concept in relation to Jaguar. I had a report at 5.30am in the morning [after the unveiling] showing reaction to the C-X17 on a global level. We use it to discover what impact it is having on the brand; do people like or dislike what we’re doing? Is it being distributed and redistributed and does it resonate?”

Join the debate

Comments
19

15 October 2013

...is the fact that Jaguar's biggest seller sits on a 15 year old Ford platform and there is no replacement ready.

The 5 and E are both younger than the XF and yet will be replaced before it. They already dwarf it, sales-wise.

The German juggernauts are going to annihilate Jaguar. The Japanese have more or less given up. If they couldn't do it, then what hope does Jag have?

15 October 2013

Most people I speak to know that the "Ford/Lincoln" platform was in fact "Jaguar". Ford took credit for of course doing Jaguar damage making people think Jaguar was built on a Ford or Lincoln platform. If you think back to the S type, whatever people thought of the styling, it was still an exceptionally good car, so the fact that the XF has a modified S type platfor makes sense. Also remember for those who are old enough, platform/underpinnings Jaguar really were top for many many years, so doesn't it make more sense that Ford would go to Jaguar and not the other way around?

15 October 2013

...is the fact that the XF flows down the road with an aplomb that seems to escape Audis and BMWs (according to various magazine reviews); pretty amazing for a "15 year old design". Wow, what a design that must be! And OF COURSE the XF can't sell in the same numbers, it's made by a much smaller company with nothing like the same capacity!

And yet there are doubts about whether even BMW can survive as an independent. I'll leave the likes of Norma Smellons to buy the Germans because, I don't know, because they get replaced more often, or because they like to back the big guy and kick the small guy, whatever, while I will buy what I like, regardless of where it's built or what internet talking heads say.

15 October 2013
275not599 wrote:

...is the fact that the XF flows down the road with an aplomb that seems to escape Audis and BMWs (according to various magazine reviews); pretty amazing for a "15 year old design". ....

That's not so much a "fact", rather an opinion, at least when it comes to comparing XF with the 5-series. Maybe Autocar continually bangs on about this, but this is not a universally shared opinion either.

Also, regarding Adrian Hallmark's comment here:

Quote:

"When we’re at our best, we build the best-looking, the fastest and most engaging and the most high-tech cars in the world."

I'd say the guy is getting a tad carried away there. He and the Jag management team should keep the focus on getting the product strategy right, i.e. not expand too quickly and overstretch the company, instead of making grandiose claims.

15 October 2013

@275not599

No-one cares what you are going to buy. As this has no relevance to the survival of Jaguar, and that is what this story is about.

But whatever you buy, I hope it has room for your enormous handbag. They make an estate XF now, perhaps you could fold the back seats down and squeeze it in.

15 October 2013

It really is tiresome, reading all these PR releases about the future, maybe.

When are Jaguar putting on sale their next new car, and what is it?

15 October 2013

People having to respond to every JLR story with constant repetitive bile about what THEY personally don't like about this companies products and the fact that THEY don't want to read about it.

Here a suggestion DON'T read these articles and keep YOUR boring opinions to your selves unless YOU have something new and constructive to say.

15 October 2013
gussy51 wrote:

It’s got boring now, people having to respond to every JLR story with constant repetitive bile about what THEY personally don't like about this companies products and the fact that THEY don't want to read about it.

Here(’s) a suggestion DON'T read these articles and keep YOUR boring opinions to your selves unless YOU have something new and constructive to say.

Eh! “gussy”, tell us what you really think!

Please . . . don’t hold back!!

I have already posted on a “sister” thread . . . .

. . . No one has said that they want Jaguar to fail, and disappear. It is a testament to the goodwill that still surrounds the company, that so many folk are concerned enough to contribute their comments, to a web-site such as this.

You seem to think that the current mediocre performance by Jaguar is acceptable! Even though this mediocre performance is in spite of the greatest financial, technological, and infrastructure investment they have ever enjoyed - and which has resulted in the greatest number of vehicles (on sale at the one time), that Jaguar has ever brought to the market place!

The final paragraph of my initial post on the “sister” thread was . . .

RCT V wrote:

It is hoped that Jaguar would accept all the above suggestions as positive and constructive. However, from previous experience it is evident that the company is afflicted by the dismissive malady often referred to as “not invented here”.

Do you work for Jaguar ?!

15 October 2013

No I don't work for Jaguar or Land Rover or any other company that is in anyway affiliated with them. Also for the record I don't own a JLR vehicle and never have done and am never likely to either given my present salary.

I don't for a minute suggest that all JLR cars are perfect far from it. I'm very disappointed that the F-Type isn't narrower, with a better boot, with better MPG and a cheaper price tag - but I'm glad it exists and is selling reasonably well. It means that the next all new F-Type (G-Type?) might be better. Perhaps it would benefit from the new smaller allegedly lighter platform. Just because a company has historically missed targets in some way doesn't mean that they will do in future. The main topic of recent articles is that JLR are investing big money on all new technology, thats all. And this is good news for consumer choice.

My overall point is that everytime a JLR article is published a group of people immediately make sweeping statements and abuse Autocar writers for reporting the news. Sometimes the news will be regurgitated PR bluster sure, but thats just the way it is. I just wish everyone would stop getting their knickers in a twist over it!

15 October 2013
gussy51 wrote:

People having to respond to every JLR story with constant repetitive bile about what THEY personally don't like about this companies products and the fact that THEY don't want to read about it.

Here a suggestion DON'T read these articles and keep YOUR boring opinions to your selves unless YOU have something new and constructive to say.

I look forward to seeing a new Jaguar in the showrooms - I might well buy one - but I'm so fed up of maybe and when that I might lose interest altogether - is that constructive enough?

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