Currently reading: Ford looks to join CO2 pool after Kuga PHEV recall
Ford of Europe will partner with other manufacturers to meet EU emissions targets after Kuga fire risk recall
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2 mins read
15 October 2020

Ford of Europe will join an emissions pool with other car makers as it seeks to reduce its CO2 levels and avoid fines imposed by EU regulations.

The announcement comes just days after Renault opened an emissions pool and Volvo indicated it would be open to doing so, suggesting that the two brands are among the manufacturers Ford is planning to partner with.

In a statement, Ford of Europe said that although it was on track to meet its emissions targets, problems with its Kuga plug-in hybrid (PHEV) - which has withdrawn from sale since August following safety issues - mean that it will fail to meet the EU’s passenger vehicles levels “on our own”.

Ford must therefore purchase emissions credits from other manufacturers to avoid harsh EU fines. Transport & Environment claimed that Ford was less than 1.4g/km from meeting EU targets at the start of the year.

The Kuga PHEV was taken off sale in August and 20,808 examples recalled by Ford due to concerns about overheating battery packs, which resulted in some cars catching fire. Ford has also told buyers not to charge their high-voltage battery “until further notice” and drive the car only in “EV Auto” drive mode.

Ford has given affected owners a free three-year service and maintenance plan and, as of October, owners are also being offered a £500 voucher towards fuel as a goodwill gesture.

While Ford is struggling to meet its EU targets for passenger vehicles, it expects to exceed its targets on light commercial vehicles. In light of this, Ford said: “We have filed separately our intent to form an open pool so other OEMs – including Volkswagen AG – can benefit from the positive CO2 performance of our light commercial fleet.”

Ford and Renault are not the only manufacturers to exploit CO2 pools. Last year, Tesla made headlines when it admitted that it was making “hundreds of millions” of pounds selling EV credits to Fiat Chrysler Automobiles.

READ MORE

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15

15 October 2020

In the UK at leat, not only do they sell no bevs the one plug in they sell cannot be plugged in, even their mild hybrids are 5 years behind.

To issue statements that one fault in one car has necessitated them to buy credits is just cop out.

As I said years ago, ignore the bev at your peril, looks like ford did and they are now paying for it, in fines.

15 October 2020

They discover a mistake, they do everything they can to rectify it, even though the solution is costly.  What would VW have done in the same situation???

15 October 2020
jason_recliner wrote:

They discover a mistake, they do everything they can to rectify it, even though the solution is costly.  What would VW have done in the same situation???

Discover a mistake, not really a discovery in sense of finding a cure to measles, they self combusted into a pile of ashes.

Do everything they can to fix it, other than fix it.

15 October 2020
xxxx wrote:

jason_recliner wrote:

They discover a mistake, they do everything they can to rectify it, even though the solution is costly.  What would VW have done in the same situation???

Discover a mistake, not really a discovery in sense of finding a cure to measles, they self combusted into a pile of ashes.

Do everything they can to fix it, other than fix it.

15 October 2020

It's 2020 and Ford can't produce a safe PHEV. This is over two decades after Honda and Toyota launched production hybrid cars globally, and nearly 15 years since the first PHEV Prius. 

Furthermore, they can't even make the Fiesta PHEV in an auto, because they just cant engineer it. 

Pathetic, frankly. The whole hybrid product division should be fired. 

15 October 2020
Sulphur Man wrote:

It's 2020 and Ford can't produce a safe PHEV. This is over two decades after Honda and Toyota launched production hybrid cars globally, and nearly 15 years since the first PHEV Prius. 

Furthermore, they can't even make the Fiesta PHEV in an auto, because they just cant engineer it. 

Pathetic, frankly. The whole hybrid product division should be fired. 

15 October 2020
xxxx wrote:

In the UK at leat, not only do they sell no bevs the one plug in they sell cannot be plugged in, even their mild hybrids are 5 years behind.

To issue statements that one fault in one car has necessitated them to buy credits is just cop out.

As I said years ago, ignore the bev at your peril, looks like ford did and they are now paying for it, in fines.

As a VW fanboy you have no room to talk.. As was said years ago,

you have nothing to say, and you're saying it too loud.

Now get back in your Polo and shush.. 

15 October 2020
Citytiger wrote:

xxxx wrote:

In the UK at leat, not only do they sell no bevs the one plug in they sell cannot be plugged in, even their mild hybrids are 5 years behind.

To issue statements that one fault in one car has necessitated them to buy credits is just cop out.

As I said years ago, ignore the bev at your peril, looks like ford did and they are now paying for it, in fines.

As a VW fanboy you have no room to talk.. As was said years ago,

you have nothing to say, and you're saying it too loud.

Now get back in your Polo and shush.. 

Yesterday I was a Tesla fandoy, few months ago a Suzuki one. Polo, is that all youve got.

Your pointless irrelevant post sums you up, pointless.

15 October 2020

So the fines are so prohibitive that Manufacturers would rather pay millions of pounds to their competitors than to the EU. That's stupid.

Surely it would make more sense for the EU fines to be directed into EV infrastructure spending or some percentage of it given back to the manufacturer but ring fenced for EV development. And if the fines were less draconian this would also encourage manufacturers to put the money into the EU.

I know, they should've hit their targets but I just don't see how it helps in the bigger picture, a system that encourages manufacturers to buy credits off each other. Utter nonsense. 

16 October 2020
harf wrote:

So the fines are so prohibitive that Manufacturers would rather pay millions of pounds to their competitors than to the EU. That's stupid.

Surely it would make more sense for the EU fines to be directed into EV infrastructure spending or some percentage of it given back to the manufacturer but ring fenced for EV development. And if the fines were less draconian this would also encourage manufacturers to put the money into the EU.

I know, they should've hit their targets but I just don't see how it helps in the bigger picture, a system that encourages manufacturers to buy credits off each other. Utter nonsense. 

I agree.

The whole idea of a Co2 pool is a farce.

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