Currently reading: Ferrari wants fewer sales but higher profits
Luca di Montezemolo, boss of Ferrari, aims to boost exclusivity and profit by reducing sales and offering increased personalisation
Jim Holder
News
2 mins read
8 May 2013

Ferrari boss Luca di Montezemolo has announced plans for Ferrari to sell fewer cars this year than in 2012, but achieve greater profits, as it bids to preserve the exclusivity of the brand.

"When you buy a Ferrari you buy a dream, and customers must be reassured that we will preserve that dream," said di Montezemolo. "We will slow down our manufacturing pace accordingly.

"Our growth in recent years has been driven by emerging markets. Our goal now is to aim for exclusivity. We will manufacture less, preserve the flow of cars to the market and protect secondhand markets."

Montezemolo aims for Ferrari to sell fewer than 7,000 cars in 2013, excluding any of its recently launched LaFerrari models. In 2012 the firm delivered a total of 7,318 cars.

He also ruled out diversifying Ferrari's portfolio in to new segments such as an SUV, four door or small car. "I tell such customers to look to Maserati," said di Montezemolo. "We will not deviate from our core products."

Montezemolo did, however, reveal that he wanted to balance sales between the USA, Europe, the Middle East, the Far East and China more equally in future. At present, more than half of Ferrari's sales are in Europe and the Middle East.

Montezemolo, who has been Chairman of Ferrari S.p.A. since November 1991, denied the world economic crisis sparked the decision, pointing to strong first quarter sales in 2013. Excluding LaFerrari sales, the firm sold 4.0 per cent more cars year-on-year, but grew its net profit by 36.5 per cent.

The firm will also look to increase its profits, despite restricting sales. This will be achieved via greater personalisation and bespoke programmes, which will offer what Ferrari claims to be "the ultimate in exclusivity".

Ferrari previously announced plans to cut sales in 2003, using the same reasoning of preserving its exclusivity.

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Symanski 9 May 2013

Suffering Lower Sales? Say that's your goal!

Everybody seems to have missed this.

Every top marque has been struggling in recent years.   Ferrari will have masked that with expansion in to emerging markets, but they won't be immune to what every other high end manufacturer has seen too.   Remember - Monty has seen the order books!

So how do you explain having lower sales?   It's obviously bad news, so spin it in to company strategy.   Aim for lower sales, but increased margins.

I also believe that having Alonso in their team is costing them prestige.   And thereby sales.   You're either a blind fan of Alonso - a "Alonbie" (Alonso Zombie) - or you're absolutely against someone who you consider to be a cheat in F1.   Certainly the Ferrari F1 merchandise on eBay is absolutely worthless now.   Wasn't like that a few years back.

disco.stu 9 May 2013

Symanski wrote: So how do

Symanski wrote:

So how do you explain having lower sales?   It's obviously bad news, so spin it in to company strategy.   Aim for lower sales, but increased margins.

Instead of mocking it, you should be applauding it.  Every car company in Europe should be aiming for this.  Every manufacturer is continually targeting growth, and there simply is no growth - the market is saturated with makes and models, and supply across the board is far greater than overall demand.  Instead of increasing volume to generate profit, manufacturers and dealers need to be finding ways to sell fewer cars for more money.  Continuing along their current paths will inevitably lead to more marques going under.

Symanski 9 May 2013

Not mocking.

disco.stu wrote:

Instead of mocking it, you should be applauding it.

I'm not mocking - observing.

Also, nice advert for your website.

disco.stu 9 May 2013

Symanski wrote: I also

Symanski wrote:

I also believe that having Alonso in their team is costing them prestige.   And thereby sales.   You're either a blind fan of Alonso - a "Alonbie" (Alonso Zombie) - or you're absolutely against someone who you consider to be a cheat in F1.   Certainly the Ferrari F1 merchandise on eBay is absolutely worthless now.   Wasn't like that a few years back.

Oh dear.  That's just so ridiculous it's not even funny.

Symanski 9 May 2013

Low value of Ferrari kit.

disco.stu wrote:

Symanski wrote:

Certainly the Ferrari F1 merchandise on eBay is absolutely worthless now.   Wasn't like that a few years back.

Oh dear.  That's just so ridiculous it's not even funny.

It's true.   Ferrari merchandise is only goes for a fraction of what it used to go for a few years back.   If you are still a Ferrari fan and want a bargin head over to eBay!

A straw poll amongst some of my friends who were Ferrari fans and they simply won't support Alonso.   Won't wear the T-Shirts etc that they bought at the Monza GP (the one Vettel won).   They simply won't support someone who they see as an unsporting cheat.

Do you get many clicks from here via the advert for your website that's in all your posts?

Penfold 9 May 2013

That's nonsense. Just because

That's nonsense. Just because yourself and your friends don't like him, doesn't mean the rest of the world bar zombies don't. And even if they didn't, how many actually would not choose a 458 because Alonso drives a F1 car with the same name?

Many F1 drivers cheat!

Symanski 9 May 2013

Not quite as popular.

Penfold wrote:

how many actually would not choose a 458 because Alonso drives a F1 car with the same name?

F1 is the biggest advert for Ferrari.   Sure, for many whoever is driving for them won't matter.   But for some it's a big issue who they wish to be associated with.   And there's also the McLaren alternative to the 458 too.

But Ferrari sell more T-Shirts via their store than they do cars.   All that adds up; it's a major income for Ferrari and why they've expanded their stores around the world.   Just have a look at the Ferrari Store's website!   But on eBay, the prices have plumted.   That's as good an indication as any that Ferrari merchandise isn't as popular as it was.

As for my friends and I - you should see the invites to races we've turned down!   Wink

TS7 8 May 2013

Just double the price...

... some bunch of tossers, with more money than taste or class, will still buy them.

GenericAutocarC... 9 May 2013

TS7 wrote: ... some bunch of

TS7 wrote:

... some bunch of tossers, with more money than taste or class, will still buy them.

You need to be a fagg0t to buy an overpriced car you say? Does this apply to other brands or just  people that buy Ferraris?

gillmanjr 8 May 2013

I think this is the right

I think this is the right move for Ferrari.  If things turned into a huge mass assembly line operation the image of the brand would be seriously damaged, if not destroyed.  Likewise I think it is a mistake for Maserati to be aiming for the huge mass market production that they are trying to achieve.  Its going to ruin Maserati's appeal.  And if their cars can't compete with the German's in terms of reliability and practicality they aren't going to be able to achieve the sales figures they are aiming for.  With Ferrari being what they are no body expects a practical or reliable car, its a FERRARI.

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