Mercedes-Benz aims to have 130 electrified model variants on sale by 2022, alongside electric vans, buses and trucks
Steve Cropley Autocar
12 December 2018

Daimler has taken a major step forward in its electrification strategy by ordering "more than €20 billion" worth of battery cells for EVs.

The order, which is expected to see the Mercedes-Benz brand through to 2030, is part of a plan to have "130 electrified variants of Mercedes-Benz cars by 2022". Alongside this, the company confirms it will be selling electric vans, buses and trucks in the next four years.

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Daimler joins fellow German firms BMW and the VW Group in putting forward a multi-billion euro electrification plan, which will also see the brand investing in a global network of battery assembly plants, with three to be installed in Germany, one in China, one in Thailand and one in the US. It's not yet clear which companies will be supplying the latest order, but Daimler has contracts with a number of Korean and Chinese suppliers. 

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Daimler boss Dieter Zetsche previously confirmed that it will offer an electrified version of every Mercedes-Benz and Smart by 2022 – but at the same time launched a defence of diesel engines.

Speaking at the 2017 Frankfurt motor show, Zetsche confirmed that Daimler’s Smart brand would offer an ell-electric range by the end of the decade. Zetsche added: “By 2022, we’ll have the entire Mercedes-Benz product portfolio in electrified version as well, to offer a maximum of choices for our consumers. The time is right.”

Zetsche also echoed Volkswagen Group chairman Matthias Müller in arguing there was still a place for diesel engines. After admitting the German motor industry had suffered “a loss of trust” in the public view of its ability to provide sustainable mobility, Zetsche noted Daimler was investing €3bn on new diesel engine technology.

Zetsche added that the firm had already developed what he called “the diesel of the future”, which he claimed had already overcome the concerns of the strongest critics. Zetsche said that the world “needed” diesel engines “to meet our climate targets”, and added his belief that “public discourse has become more rational” about such engines.

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12

12 December 2018

have blown it, now the Japanese are threatening to "run them outta town" with hybrids and that's because as I've said the japanese and americans knew not to waste time with dirty diesel unless it was going to be used in a truck. Now we are getting daily stories regarding how "german-electric" is now the way to go with nonsense about 800 volt charging systems and the like. The EU should have started building a more robust electrical system throughout europe but they tried to cheap out and profiteer with diesel, then VW got caught and that really screwed the "german-motor-car-perception-thing" in particular.

12 December 2018
405line wrote:

have blown it, now the Japanese are threatening to "run them outta town" with hybrids and that's because as I've said the japanese and americans knew not to waste time with dirty diesel unless it was going to be used in a truck. Now we are getting daily stories regarding how "german-electric" is now the way to go with nonsense about 800 volt charging systems and the like. The EU should have started building a more robust electrical system throughout europe but they tried to cheap out and profiteer with diesel, then VW got caught and that really screwed the "german-motor-car-perception-thing" in particular.

Youre talking rubbish - if the EU hadnt had so many diesels over the last 20 years CO2 emissions would be 20% higher than they are now, making climate change even worse. The only mistake the EU made was not making NOx and particulate levels for diesels much stricter at the same time as promoting their use. And as for the pharse "dirty diesel" its a total misnomer - petrols are dirty too, but in different ways, chiefly their 20% higher CO2 emissions. The "profittering" accusations are also total crap as is your suggestion that any company other than VW and its associated companies "screwed" the german motor car perception thing, it was VW Group alone and no one else.

XXXX just went POP.

12 December 2018

that you (still) drive a diesel and were conned because you didn't know any better...is that correct?

12 December 2018
405line wrote:

that you (still) drive a diesel and were conned because you didn't know any better...is that correct?

Yes

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

12 December 2018

"The only mistake the EU made..."!!!  Not enough space here to list them all.

On the subject itself, why are Ford so lagging behind?!?  The French and Germans are offering vans in EV format, but still nothing from Ford.

I say my bit, then go. So although I'm interested in what you may initially say, I don't care what you think about what I've written, so I won't read whatever your reply is.

12 December 2018
That sounds the death knell for the black fuel. Mercedes was the company that introduced diesel to passenger cars. End of the road for the farce that was diesel. Good riddance!

12 December 2018
fadyady wrote:

That sounds the death knell for the black fuel. Mercedes was the company that introduced diesel to passenger cars. End of the road for the farce that was diesel. Good riddance!

It was Citroën

12 December 2018

130 variants in 4 years, that's 30+ a year. They're struggling to do one or two at the moment

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

12 December 2018

 €20 billion Euro!, eh? what?, if this is for Batteries alone, what’s the rest of the budget like?, this is just silly money, there’s a lot more in this a World that €20 billion Euros could be better spent on than Cars!

Peter Cavellini.

12 December 2018

This as many point out is the death knell for the black stuff, surprised it took them this long to realise, I guess after investingg so much on Diesel engines it was difficult for them to let go. The 130 variants is what it says, this is not 130:different models e.g A class, B class etc but maybe say 10 different variants of A class with different battery ranges and so on so I can see the 130 being true but it’s a stretched truth in reality. I find this revolution very exciting and it’s great for the consumer because many brands are going to have to work harder to keep their clients

You are the weakest link......

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