Five-door liftback joins coupé and convertible variants in 4-series range, with prices starting at £29,000
4 March 2014

The BMW 4-series Gran Coupé has made its public debut at the Geneva motor show.

Set to go on sale in the UK in June with prices starting from £29,420, the five-door liftback extends the 4-series line-up to three distinct body styles. It joins the 4-series coupé and convertible to create a range intended to rival that of the Audi A5.

The new car is similar in appeal to the 6-series Gran Coupé. However, BMW has turned away from using the conventional boot of that model, instead giving the 4-series Gran Coupé a more versatile five-door liftback arrangement, like that of the bigger, taller 3-series Gran Turismo. BMW officials say this format will make the 4-series Gran Coupé more appealing to younger buyers. 

The result is a car similar in layout to the A5 Sportback, with a shallow glasshouse, two short rear doors (all of them frameless), a coupé-like roofline and a large liftback-style tailgate that opens automatically, either via the key fob or an optional foot-operated sensor incorporated into the rear bumper. 

The 4-series Gran Coupé is 4638mm long, 1825mm wide and 1389mm tall. That’s 14mm longer, 14mm wider and 40mm lower than the 3-series saloon. Despite its sleek appearance, the drag coefficients are only average by class standards, with a best of 0.27 in 418d guise, rising to 0.30 on all-wheel-drive models.

The new car has the same chassis as that of the 4-series coupé and convertible, so it’s less spacious inside than the long-wheelbase 3 GT. Its wheelbase is 2810mm, with track widths of 1545mm at the front and 1594mm at the rear. The load bay has a 480-litre capacity with the rear seats up and 1300 litres with them folded down.

The 4-series Gran Coupé’s rear doors and tailgate add 50kg to the kerb weight of the equivalent coupé models. The lightest of the launch models, the 420i, hits the scales at 1480kg, which is 80kg more than the 320i saloon.

The 4-series Gran Coupé will be launched with a choice of five engines and either a standard six-speed manual 
or optional eight-speed automatic gearbox. A further two diesel engines are 
planned to follow this year.

Rear-wheel drive is standard. Optional four-wheel drive will be available from UK launch on the £33,815 420d xDrive, with other variants likely to follow. Contrary to earlier rumours, there are no plans for an M4 variant, but BMW officials do not rule out an M Performance model.

Heading the initial line-up will be the 435i, which starts at £41,155. It is powered by a turbocharged 3.0-litre straight-six petrol engine. With 302bhp and 295lb ft of torque, it covers 0-62mph in 5.2sec in automatic guise, while returning combined fuel economy of 39.8mpg and a CO2 output of 189g/km.

The 428i sits at the more affordable end of the petrol range, priced from £32,815. Its turbocharged 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine has 242bhp and 258lb ft. The same engine is also used in the 420i, where it delivers 181bhp and 199lb ft.

A 2.0-litre turbodiesel features in the 418d (from £30,995) and 420d (£31,795). It delivers 141bhp and 236lb ft 
in the 418d, while the 420d produces 181bhp and 280lb ft. The 418d has a 0-62mph time of 9.2sec, along with combined economy of 62.8mpg and CO2 of 119g/km in manual guise.

After the launch, BMW is expected to add 430d and 435d models to the line-up. The 435d xDrive will be available exclusively with four-wheel drive and an automatic gearbox. Both use BMW’s 3.0-litre, six-cylinder turbodiesel. It has 255bhp and 413lb ft in the 430d, while the 435d’s outputs swell to 309bhp and 465lb ft.

Read more Geneva motor show news.

Our Verdict

BMW 4 Series

The facelifted BMW 4 Series has improved on an already solid proposition but can it hold off the likes of the latest generation Audi A5 and Mercedes-Benz C-Class Coupé?

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Comments
18

2 February 2014
... while there is nothing offence about this, infact it does look a little better than the regular 3 series...i just dont see why one would buy essentially a 4 door 3 series, yet worse drag co, less space in the rear, more weight, small tight rear doors, more expensive also...

Although for buyer in this clas who are image conscious, the above doesnt matter, they would spend a few extra bucks for the impracticality Vs image.

I hear Merc are also planning a grand coupe verison of the new C-class. I hope that is at least more space efficeint yet keeping the potential looks of a 4door grand coupe..at least we know merc are kings at Aerodynamics.

2 February 2014
Bobstardeluxe wrote:

...i just dont see why one would buy essentially a 4 door 3 series.

Whilst price is definitely a factor in comparison to the 3 saloon, from a previous owner of a E46 coupe, I can't see why anyone would buy a std 4 series as this grand has it licked in every department, including looks. As for the 3series GT !!! I fear for those who've already bought or ordered a GT as no doubt they're on anti-depressants after seeing this. Would even go as far to say the grand coupe is one of the best looking BMW's ever whilst both the 3 and 5 GT's are some of the worst. The 3 GT doesn't even have price advantage.

2 February 2014
Its no more a coupe than a 5 door Mondeo or Insignia, its a 3 series 5 door hatchback, with a £5k price penalty. If any mainstream manufacturer tried to do something similar it would be laughed at, but because its BMW apparently they have opened a new niche.. I also suspect the added rear doors and hatch will affect the rigidity and handling over the equivalent 4 door saloon or 2 door coupe as well, and also increase the internal noise levels at the same time.

haz

2 February 2014
So BMW start with the 3 series. They charge you extra to take away 2 doors, and your left with the 4 series. And then they charge you even more, put the doors back on and you get this gran coupe?

I thought this was a bit odd with the 6 series, but the 6 series gran coupe does look better (somewhat) than a regular 5 series. But this 4 series gran coupe looks too similar to a regular 3 series if you ask me. Doesnt even look like a coupe, its a 4 door saloon to my eyes

2 February 2014
I think the CLS was the first. Likeyou say ITS A HATCHBACK!!

Oxford definition of a coupé: "1a car with a fixed roof, two doors, and a sloping rear. "

4 DOOR CARS ARE NOT COUPÉS!!!!

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2 February 2014
Baggsson wrote:

I think the CLS was the first. Likeyou say ITS A HATCHBACK!!

Oxford definition of a coupé: "1a car with a fixed roof, two doors, and a sloping rear. "

4 DOOR CARS ARE NOT COUPÉS!!!!

The Rover P5 Coupe from the 1960s had 4 doors....

2 February 2014
catnip wrote:
Baggsson wrote:

I think the CLS was the first. Likeyou say ITS A HATCHBACK!!

Oxford definition of a coupé: "1a car with a fixed roof, two doors, and a sloping rear. "

4 DOOR CARS ARE NOT COUPÉS!!!!

The Rover P5 Coupe from the 1960s had 4 doors....

But this hasnt got 4 doors its got 5, its a hatchback..

2 February 2014
This is all too predictable, next there'll be a sports estate version.

BMW missed a trick here too, the 2 series (4 less so) is probably one of the nicest looking cars of recent years, but the 2, 4 and 6 series should hark back to the seventies and eighties, and be a bit different - with the back to basics styling and simplicity. The distinction would make it a bit easier (and more palatable) for the 1,3 and 5 series to become more 'safe', which sadly is what is happening to the wider range now.

2 February 2014
Moons ago the 3 series was an upmarket car, but now it outsells the Mondeo. It was never a 'value' purchase, but thats exactly why its so popular on CoCar lists, with its cheap lease rates, and image.

The 4 series destroys the 'Value' side of the argument by being expensive for no good reason. But that will ensure it sells to those who want to make a statement, the same people who bought a BMW for its image 20 years ago.

I am sure the 4 series will sell well, to those who dont want to be seen driving a 3 series anymore (just like the 3 series driver 20 years ago didnt want to be a Mondeo driver)

2 February 2014
I understand people's views of the GC being pointless from a customer viewpoint, but, as the success of the A5 Sportback and CLS shows, BMW simply cannot afford to miss out on this segment of the market. As far as BMW is concerned, the only justification for this car needed is demand, which is clearly there, even if it comes from people who don't seem to be entirely rational - but who cares about who the customer is, so long as they are buying cars?

Also on the topic of naming, I do think BMW's naming system makes sense. While the 4-series may share the same front, interior and power train as the 3-series, underneath it is a different car: wider, longer and taughter. To base the GC on a 4 series and then call is a 3 series GC would be more illogical in my opinion. In addition, while its true that the conventional meaning of coupé is a two-door, where does this word even come from? It is actually the conjugation of the french verb 'couper', which means 'to cut'. Sure, this could mean to cut 2 doors off, but it could also mean cutting the roofline and keeping 4 doors, which is what BMW has done.

On a final note, I think it looks stunning. My only wish would be for a more original interior, which admittedly has been lifted from the 3 series.

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