Karl-Thomas Neumann slams current emissions negotiations and exclusions while suggesting a new system to fairly evaluate the environmental impact of cars
Julian Rendell
9 September 2013

Opel boss Karl-Thomas Neumann has attacked the infighting that is preventing progress on a new EU carbon dioxide target, and called on the EU to introduce a new system for evaluating the environmental impact of cars post-2020.

Speaking at a conference ahead of tomorrow’s Frankfurt motor show, Neumann launched a veiled attack on rival German manufacturers who are trying to negotiate exclusions from the 95g/km target planned for 2020.

"There are political games being played and we are at a standstill in the negotiations. It is time to stop," he said. "We need to stop talking about it and start working on it."

In place of the simple fleet average of tailpipe carbon emissions, Neumann suggested a new system built around sustainability and fair play. Under the heading of sustainability, he called for a system built around individual output of CO2.

"It can’t be right that a high mileage small hatchback like a Corsa is seen to be better than a sports car like a Corvette that spends much of its time in the garage," said Neumann.

He also blasted the EU plan to financially punish car-makers by a factor of up to 66 for slipping over the g/km limit by a single gramme, while leaving other industries unpunished.

"It also cannot be right that the lignite [brown coal] industry can just buy a certificate and continue on without a penalty".

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Comments
7

9 September 2013

plain talking common sense!

I am sure it will fall on deaf ears in the EU

9 September 2013

CO2 is produced by burning fossil fuels.

The more fossil fuel that' is burned, the greater the CO2 output.

The public as consumers of vehicles have to accept responsibility for CO2 output.

For us to be persuaded to consume less, the most effective way to achieve is this is to pay more for fossil fuel. As can be seen with tobacco, high taxation levels work to reduce/quit..

Car manufacturers will respond by reducing fuel consumption on mainstream vehicles to keep up sales and survive.

This will never be implemented - no votes so relax.

9 September 2013

CO2 doesnt have a negative environmental impact. We should be focusing on particulates and NOx.

9 September 2013

... someone from the car industry talks sense. European emissions regulations are a joke. Car makers are simply tweaking engines to fool this archaic system hence the increasing discrepancy between the claimed and the real life figures.

9 September 2013
fadyady wrote:

... someone from the car industry talks sense. European emissions regulations are a joke. Car makers are simply tweaking engines to fool this archaic system hence the increasing discrepancy between the claimed and the real life figures.

Dont mix EU emission regs with CO2 targets, they are very different things. The EU emission regs are very good and have done a lot to reduce pollution, and they have nothing to do with CO2 regulation and its not tested at all.

9 September 2013
Turismo wrote:
fadyady wrote:

... someone from the car industry talks sense. European emissions regulations are a joke. Car makers are simply tweaking engines to fool this archaic system hence the increasing discrepancy between the claimed and the real life figures.

Dont mix EU emission regs with CO2 targets, they are very different things.

I know what you're saying but somebody needs to fix European emissions regulations in addition to the CO2 targets for the car makers. At the end of the day both are intrinsically linked. The way they're judged needs fixing.

9 September 2013

Congratulations to Mr. Neumann on a point well made. Now if only other manufacturer bosses would come forward to support his ideas.

 

 

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