Hans-Joachim Stuck says firm wants to be an engine supplier, not a works team, from 2013
5 May 2010

Volkswagen has confirmed it is eyeing a role in Formula One as an engine supplier, not as a team owner, if it enters the sport as expected from 2013.

That is according to former grand prix driver Hans-Joachim Stuck, who is now VW's motorsport representative.

Stuck told German magazine Sport Bild "it is clear that we are looking at Formula One," but that VW is "waiting for the FIA's decision in respect of the use of a world engine”.

Stuck also confirmed that VW would not have "[its] own team like Mercedes".

F1 is expected to switch to turbocharged 1.5-litre four-cylinder engines mated to KERS from 2013, but the sport is also keen on improving the efficiency of the current 2.4-litre V8 units in the mean time.

Sarah Laughton

See all the latest VW reviews, news and video

Join the debate

Comments
16

5 May 2010

which is why vw are making the new golf gti engine a 1.6 turbo.

i presume.

5 May 2010

When Volkswagen start making F1 engines, does that mean that we'll have a grid full of really sensible cars, that the drivers can all go shopping in after the race?

5 May 2010

oh dear and what does he mean by ''world engine''????

5 May 2010

"World engine", are they hoping that F1 and the American CART series will agree a common engine formula?

 

5 May 2010

[quote beachland2]

which is why vw are making the new golf gti engine a 1.6 turbo.

i presume.

[/quote]It clearly states 1.5 turbo.These engines will be very highly stressed compared to a normal road car engine so will probably be nothing like each other.

5 May 2010

The World Engine is a concept whereby F1, WRC and WTCC would all share a basic engine design, but altered for each series. So the F1 engine would be turbocharged, with KERS, etc. while the WTCC engine would be naturally-aspirated with a much lower power output.

Not really a big fan of the idea myself, but i don't know how committed the manufacturers are to the concept. Last time i remember a series trying to model its engines on another series was the World Sportscar Championship, when they decided to follow F1 in the late 80s with a 3.5 litre engine. Result was that Mercedes and Peugeot realised that it would be much better value to supply the engines to F1 instead and left sportscar racing altogether to enter F1 with Sauber and Jordan respectively. None of the F1 engine suppliers of the day (Ferrari, Renault, Honda, Ford, Judd, Yamaha, etc.) were interested in strengthening their fragile F1 engines for sportscar racing and suddenly there were no manufacturers racing at Le Mans...

5 May 2010

[quote Jon Hardcastle]

[quote beachland2]

which is why vw are making the new golf gti engine a 1.6 turbo.

i presume.

[/quote]It clearly states 1.5 turbo.These engines will be very highly stressed compared to a normal road car engine so will probably be nothing like each other.[/quote]

Come on, what about the BMW M10/M12? The Formula One engine (the M12) still had a large number of parts (including the block) in common with the road car engine (as seen in every four-cylinder BMW from the 1500 to the E30 3-series)...

5 May 2010

[quote Rover P6 3500S]Come on, what about the BMW M10/M12? The Formula One engine (the M12) still had a large number of parts (including the block) in common with the road car engine (as seen in every four-cylinder BMW from the 1500 to the E30 3-series)...[/quote]

A large number of parts, or just the block? Incidentally, I remember reading somewhere, that at one time BMW were buying back 2002 Turbos, to use the engine blocks in F1 - the theory was that a few years of stress cycling made them stronger.

5 May 2010

[quote Jon Hardcastle]It clearly states 1.5 turbo.These engines will be very highly stressed compared to a normal road car engine so will probably be nothing like each other.[/quote]

autocar says 1.5. but i am saying 1.6, the formula 1 cars will be a 1.6 turbo or 1.8 turbo petrol.

also it has nothing to do with parts sharing its just that the numbers for engine capacity are the same, thats all thats needed for the marketing purpose.

5 May 2010

[quote Casanova]

[quote Rover P6 3500S]Come on, what about the BMW M10/M12? The Formula One engine (the M12) still had a large number of parts (including the block) in common with the road car engine (as seen in every four-cylinder BMW from the 1500 to the E30 3-series)...[/quote]

A large number of parts, or just the block? Incidentally, I remember reading somewhere, that at one time BMW were buying back 2002 Turbos, to use the engine blocks in F1 - the theory was that a few years of stress cycling made them stronger.

[/quote]

I believe that the head, camshaft and crankshaft were the same in both the M10 and the M12. Don't tell me BMW were scrapping the 2002s? Or were they replacing the old engines with new ones?

Pages

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Skoda-Karoq 2.0 TDI 4x4
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Diesel version of Skoda’s junior SUV is unobtrusive and undemanding, but we’d still go for the silkier petrol version of the Karoq
  • Audi Q7 e-tron
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Expensive and flawed but this understated diesel-electric Audi Q7 has a lot to offer
  • Citroën C3
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Is the third gen Citroën C3 ‘fresh and different’ enough to take on its supermini rivals? We spend six months with one to find out
  • BMW X3
    First Drive
    15 October 2017
    A satisfying rework of the X3 that usefully improves its handling, cabin finish, space and connectivity to make this BMW a class front-runner again
  • Vauxhall Insignia Country Tourer
    First Drive
    13 October 2017
    Off-road estate is now bigger, more spacious and available with torque-vectoring all-wheel drive, but is it enough to make its German rivals anxious?