PCP deals have opened up a world of possibility for car ownership; here are the cheapest cars on the market for around £100 per month
Jimi Beckwith
21 December 2016

Affordable PCP deals are opening up the prospect of new car ownership to a wider range of buyers than ever before, with deals starting from less than £100 per month. 

Does your budget stretch a little further? Here are deals for around £200 or less

Here are the best PCP deals we could find for around £100 per month, with a deposit of 15% of the car's value, a three-year deal and a 10,000-mile annual limit, along with the manufacturer's finance discount allowance.

Dacia Sandero

The car: Dacia Sandero 1.2 16V 75 Ambiance 5dr

The monthly cost: £93

The deal: Three years PCP finance with 7.9% APR. including £750 finance deposit allowance

The verdict: It's a step up from the no-frills Access model, as Ambiance adds body-coloured bumpers, USB and Bluetooth connectivity and a step up in interior trim pieces. It's no luxury supermini - it's a Sandero, after all - but it's one of the cheapest out there.

Fiat Panda

The car: Fiat Panda 1.2 Pop 5dr

The monthly cost: £108

The deal: Three years PCP finance with 5.4% APR, with £0 finance deposit allowance

The verdict: The Panda stretches the 'around £100' budget without going over £100, is spacious and handles well, with a strong range of engines to boot. At speed it's a little unsettled, and you've only got the 1.2-litre petrol to choose from, but it's one of our highest rated cars on the £100 list. 

Kia Picanto

The car: Kia Picanto 1.0 65 1 Air 5dr

The monthly cost: £97

The deal: Three years PCP finance with 4.9% APR

The verdict: We like the Picanto; in fact, it's one of the better city car offerings out there. In entry-level 1 Air trim, it keeps things simple, but the Picanto's charm and mix of capability and value won't leave you feeling short-changed for your £97 per month. 

Skoda Fabia

The car: Skoda Fabia 1.0 MPI 60 S 5dr

The monthly cost: £101

The deal: Three years PCP finance with 2.9% APR, including £1500 finance deposit allowance

The verdict: It's another car in base spec, but the Fabia has an attractive interior from bottom-spec cars upwards, so you won't be forced to endure a spartan supermini by any means; in fact, it's neatly packaged and dynamically very well rounded.

Dacia Logan

The car: Dacia Logan 1.2 16V 75 Access 5dr

The monthly cost: £106

The deal: Three years PCP finance with 47.9% APR, including £500 finance deposit allowance

The verdict: Yes, another Dacia; this time it's the Logan estate. Unlike the Sandero above, the £106-per-month Logan is in base Access trim, which means it's as no-frills as no-frills gets. In terms of space for your money, few cars provide more than the Logan. 

Suzuki Celerio

The car: Suzuki Celerio 1.0 SZ2 5dr

The monthly cost: £107

The deal: Three years PCP finance with 6.9% APR

The verdict: Few car makers offer greater value for money than Suzuki, especially with the Celerio. It's available for £107 per month, and in addition to the decent amount of space on offer, the Celerio actually offers a level of handling prowess, as Suzukis so often do. 

Our Verdict

Dacia Sandero

The Sandero represents basic motoring done well, for those who really want it

Join the debate

Comments
6

21 December 2016
Let's face it, a PCP is just a way of funding a new car's depreciation using the equity of your old trade in. But judging by the interest rate in some of the above examples (7.9% APR on a Sandero and an outrageous 47.9% on a Logan), it could be an expensive way. Most of these cars are so cheap anyway that it pays to buy outright. That way, all of your money is going on the car, not a percentage to the finance company.

21 December 2016
I can't believe Autocar never mention hand-back charges when returning cars, can easierly be equivalent to 6 months pay in these cases

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

21 December 2016
xxxx wrote:

I can't believe Autocar never mention hand-back charges when returning cars, can easierly be equivalent to 6 months pay in these cases

You get hand back charges when you buy and part-ex cars with your own money too. They're called 'getting less for your trade-in' if you've not looked after your own car.


21 December 2016
bomb wrote:
xxxx wrote:

I can't believe Autocar never mention hand-back charges when returning cars, can easierly be equivalent to 6 months pay in these cases

You get hand back charges when you buy and part-ex cars with your own money too. They're called 'getting less for your trade-in' if you've not looked after your own car.

It needs mentioning in the article. And I've never been charged dealer rates for repairs that I would normal wear and tear 'fixes' like stone chips, minor marks etc. Oh and I've never paid for a £100 valet before selling cars PRIVATLEY or trading one in which a lot of PCP companies do, and don't get me started on their admin charges

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

21 December 2016
Sounds like you've been unlucky then. We're on our 3rd lease and never encountered this.


21 December 2016
Please stop putting rubbish like this in your 'News'section.

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