Jaguar has been long-defined by the E-type and original XJ. Both cars seem to have hung over the company like a couple of family portraits. For decades, company bosses have seemed unable to allow new models to stray from an obvious family resemblance.

Then again it’s difficult to introduce new design ideas to a brand, especially one with a history as defined and distinctive as Jaguar’s.

Attempts were made. In 1967 Jaguar rolled out the Malcolm Sayer-shaped mid-engined XJ13 prototype racecar. In theory, design ideas from this car should have been fed into future Jaguar sports cars.

Instead we got the uncomfortable XJ-S, with its flat rear screen and flying buttresses, hinting at a mid-mounted engine it didn’t posses.

While the XK8, which replaced the XJ-S, did successfully build a new Jaguar big coupe aesthetic, the company’s saloon cars were still stuck in the design mire, unable to escape from their Mk2 and XJ heritage.