I haven’t been the biggest fan of electric cars. Grudgingly I can see the point of some of them and BMW is obviously very positive about the stats it has produced as a result of its recent Mini E trials.

Bought as a company vehicle someone in the accounts, HR or environmental audit department might be able to make a sound financial case for splashing out for one of those subsidised battery packers. However, Used EVs are a different matter altogether. They make me very, very nervous. That’s because one day the batteries have to be replaced.

It is all very well Nissan saying that the batteries are designed to last for 100K miles, which is the point at which I start to become interested in a used car. Reaching into my pocket and spending the thick end of a four figure sum will not make me very happy or inclined to go electric. It’s the same with power tools. No really it is.

I am on my second combi power drill, which I bought around four to five years ago with two 24V batteries so you can have one in the drill and one on the charger. The trouble is that both are now reaching the end of their lives so I get no more than five minutes of drilling action out of them.

Can I buy a replacement battery? It’s difficult but I was quoted £70, which is pretty much a new drill. As I have some intensive power drill activity coming up I decided to go back to the good old days and get one that you plug into the mains. Not only that, I paid a fiver for it at my local car boot, haggled down from six quid.

It’s an old school 1970s orange Black and Decker with a proper metal casing. Two speed, hammer and normal settings, the only things I can’t do is use it as a screwdriver or wander nonchalantly from job to job with it. I now have extension lead anxiety, but that’s a small worry compared with not having enough juice to push a drill bit through a piece of soggy balsa wood.

So from my power drill trauma I would like to conclude that all used battery cars will soon be useless. Do you agree?