From £120,5988
It's £22,000 cheaper, but that's effectively where the differences between this and the Turbo S model stop

Our Verdict

Porsche 911 Turbo

Is the forced-induction 911 still the supercar you can use every day?

  • First Drive

    2016 Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolet review

    Better than ever, in terms of its handling and the characteristically ballistic performance, and with little compromise for the soft-top
  • First Drive

    2016 Porsche 911 Turbo S UK review

    Porsche's ballistic 911 Turbo S range-topper has its engine and turbos tweaked to allow yet crazier performance. We drive it in the UK
30 August 2013

What is it?

We’ve already driven, and been predictably blown away by, the new 911 Turbo in its more powerful, more expensive S form

But what of the standard, run-of-the-mill, regular basic new 911 Turbo, the one that costs just £118,349 and produces a mere 514bhp? It is, in simple terms, pretty much the same car – and it feels every bit as outrageously fast as a consequence.

On paper, there appear to be some notable differences. It doesn't have the S model's ceramic brakes or active anti-roll bars, and it lacks the standard-fit Sport Chrono package. There are some cosmetic differences, too. The standard Turbo manages without the S version's LED headlights.

Then, of course, there's the fact that it's down some 39bhp and at least 29lb ft, resulting in fractionally slower performance – all of which saves you £22,503, compared to opting for the full-fat S model.

I’d defy anyone to notice the difference in pure performance, however, if they were strapped into the passenger seat and forced to wear a blindfold.

What's it like?

Besides the aforementioned, there are some subtle alterations between this and the S model. You don’t get the hydraulic engine mounts in the standard Turbo, for instance, even though these are available if you upgrade to the optional Sports Chrono pack for an extra couple of grand.

As a result, the body control isn’t as clean as it is in the S. This will be more noticeable in the forthcoming cabrio than it is in the coupé, admit Porsche’s engineers.

Similarly, the 0-62mph time rises from 3.1sec in the S to a dismal 3.4sec in the regular 911 Turbo, so traffic light GP desperados really should find the extra £22k for the S unless they want to risk total humiliation at the next outing.

Otherwise, it does effectively feel much like the all-singing, all-dancing Turbo S model. It's devastatingly quick, ferociously capable and utterly effortless, but it lacks the sense of occasion that you might find in a Lamborghini or Ferrari.

Should I buy one?

To be perfectly honest, the standard Porsche 911 Turbo can do pretty much everything that the S model can, but for £22k less.

Sure, there are benefits to opting for the more expensive model – such as its red line being 200rpm higher than that of the 'regular' Turbo – but out on the road most would struggle to differentiate between the two blown Porsche 911s.

The extra cost of the S model consequently feels a little difficult to justify, especially when the standard model delivers so much accessible performance already.

It doesn’t have that all-important badge on the back, mind, and in certain circles, that’s everything, even if to the rest of us it means not a whole lot.

Porsche 911 Turbo

Price £118,349; 0-62mph 3.4sec; Top speed 195mph; Economy 29.1mpg; CO2 227g/km; Kerb weight 1595kg; Engine 6 cyls horizontally opposed, 3800cc, twin-turbocharged, petrol; Power 514bhp at 6000-6500rpm; Torque 487lb ft at 1950-5000rpm; Gearbox 7-spd dual-clutch auto

Join the debate

Comments
16

30 August 2013

No, really, what can you say. Another cynical marketing ploy by Porsche. The Porsche 911 Turbo is clearly no longer as good as it could be and therefore no longer the supposed pinnacle of the 911 range. It has been deliberately dumbed down in favour of the S which gets all the goodies, the bigger sticker price and therefore the ability to introduce that nagging doubt into the mind of a prospective non-S buyer that they really could be doing better for themselves, and therefore should.

£118k, and you still don't get elec folding door mirrors, cruise control or mats - Porsche, it's 2013, have a word.

30 August 2013

Adding the wheels from the Turbo S, full LED headlights, ceramic brakes, sports chrono package and dynamic drive adds about £15k to to the price of the Turbo. Makes the £22k premium for the Turbo S seem a little more reasonable, if I had the money for one!

30 August 2013
Will86 wrote:

Adding the wheels from the Turbo S, full LED headlights, ceramic brakes, sports chrono package and dynamic drive adds about £15k to to the price of the Turbo. Makes the £22k premium for the Turbo S seem a little more reasonable, if I had the money for one!

So, take one poverty spec Turbo, add the £15k extras, get a remap, which'll cost approx £1k, and you'll then have all of the S's goodies plus more poke, and still save c. £6k. Result!

Oh, and BTW, in the above article Sutcliffe says the S's 0-60 is 3.1secs, but during this week's vid he says it's 2.9sces - which is correct?

30 August 2013
6th.replicant wrote:
Will86 wrote:

Adding the wheels from the Turbo S, full LED headlights, ceramic brakes, sports chrono package and dynamic drive adds about £15k to to the price of the Turbo. Makes the £22k premium for the Turbo S seem a little more reasonable, if I had the money for one!

So, take one poverty spec Turbo, add the £15k extras, get a remap, which'll cost approx £1k, and you'll then have all of the S's goodies plus more poke, and still save c. £6k. Result!

And then you'll loose your £6k at resale...

30 August 2013

The Porsche 911 turbo, is the biggest money spinner for Porsche. Customers are willing to pay an extra £30k, just for the Kudos. And remember its the Das Auto, bean counters, running Dr Ferdinands baby, these days.

www.KOOOLcr.com

 

30 August 2013

One of the only things that would stop me from buying it (if I had the money) is the fact that the Turbo comes without a proper manual gearbox. Some people don't realise that a proper driver's car needs a manual. I currently drive a 911, and it has the seven speed manual. The car is wonderful, and it has that fizz that no DSG, PDK, S-Tronic or tiptronic 'box can rival.

Bodge to the Future

30 August 2013

I have been configurating at the middle of the range,the 4S,and what really "gets my goat" is extra money for a rear wiper !!! In UK at least that should be standard.I think the trick is to go for a good used 1-2 years old where all the goodies have depreciated.

Madmac

30 August 2013

Defo go used. You stand a good chance of getting the spec you want; you'll get 2 years warranty + any remaining from the original two; you won't have to wait, and it'll be cheaper.

30 August 2013

Well done Steve,now who else makes cars like this?, you know?, just as good, but....cheaper?

Peter Cavellini.

30 August 2013

What Steve left out of the equation is that the extra 22K saves you from the utter humiliation of admitting to your golfing chums that your 911 Turbo is a non-S.

Seems to me Porsche are missing an opportunity here. Build a sleek, 4WD golf cart, stuff the options list with expensive items that come standard on other golf carts, charge 50K basic, but including delivery to your club. Laugh all the way to the bank then introduce the S model.

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