From £22,1298
Range-topping 3008 gets loads of kit and one of the fastest engines in the line-up, but it’s too expensive to recommend ahead of rivals
Doug Revolta Autocar
22 November 2016

What is it?

This flagship Peugeot 3008 is “an unknown entity”, according to the model’s product manager.

That statement makes it sound slightly more exciting than it is, given that we're dealing with a diesel-powered family SUV with 178bhp. The reason that it is still is a relative unknown for the French manufacturer is because an equivalent top-spec GT model wasn't offered in the 3008’s previous life.

It wasn’t a difficult decision to reinvent the vaguely crossover-like 3008 MPV into an SUV for this generation. With SUVs becoming less of a niche option and more of a booming mainstream preference, the PSA Group took the decision to let Citroën take care of the shrinking MPV market with its established C4 Picasso family, leaving Peugeot to reinvent the 3008.

The 1.2-litre petrol and 1.6-litre diesel variants we’ve driven already have shown that the 3008 has substance to match its style. This version's 2.0-litre diesel engine, paired with a six-speed automatic transmission, is the only powerplant you can have in the new, range-topping GT spec. It’s the same engine found in the 308, 508 and DS 5, but it’s only expected to account for a small 5% slice of the 3008’s sales. Is it worth a look?

What's it like?

One of the 3008's most significant areas of improvement over its predecessor is the interior, and it remains a standout positive for this GT model. Every trim level gets a generous level of kit and a high-quality cabin, with a 12.3in digital instrument panel and an 8.0in touchscreen. GT adds adaptive cruise control and some styling upgrades over the equipment you get with GT Line, as well as a full leather interior and electric, massaging seats.

This 2.0-litre diesel is the most powerful in the range, but its 0-62mph time only squeaks in under nine seconds and on the road it doesn’t feel particularly brisk. There's plenty of low-end shove, though, and the drivetrain manages to cope with the power - unless you try a particularly aggressive standing start on greasy asphalt. Don't expect performance thrills from this engine, though. That could be saved for a potential GTi version, which has been mooted.

What you can expect is decent fuel economy. The 2.0-litre diesel is very competitive against its rivals in that respect, being faster and yet more fuel efficient than an equivalent Nissan Qashqai and Renault Kadjar. While it's the gruffest sounding of the 3008 range, it’s still quite refined, and especially so when cruising below 3000rpm, although heavy acceleration does bring some diesel boom.

A Sport mode adds weight to the steering but makes it a bit too heavy, so things are best left in the normal driving mode, in which the steering is accurate and feels much more naturally weighted. Body roll is decently controlled through corners and handling is generally good for an SUV, but the 3008 feels less engaging than a Seat Ateca. GT spec also adds 19in alloys which bring a harshness to the ride, although never to truly uncomfortable levels. 

The six-speed automatic gearbox – available on all engines apart from the 148bhp 2.0-litre diesel – is pretty good at judging shifts, but the changes aren't lightning fast. They're quick enough to cope with the gentle family drives this car will likely be subjected to, though, and the paddles on the steering wheel are responsive.

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The 3008's driving position is comfortable, although it could do with a little more adjustment in the steering wheel’s reach, and while visibility is generally good, the view out of the back is slightly restricted because the rear screen is quite slim. There are a couple of handy practical additions inside, too, such as three Isofix mounting points (most rivals have two), and the front seat can fold flat to help with extra-long loads. Plus the 3008 has one of the biggest boots in the class.

Should I buy one?

The 3008 counts SUVs such as the Seat Ateca, Volkswagen Tiguan, Renault Kadjar, Hyundai Tucson and Nissan Qashqai among its rivals. There's plenty of quality to choose from in the class, then, but the 3008 still manages to stand out thanks to its quality interior and tidy handling. This version also comes with loads of kit, a strong engine and an impressive interior, all of which sound promising until you consider the price.

For £32,995 it’s more expensive than most of its SUV rivals, and while you get a lot of kit, you don’t get all-wheel drive and it doesn’t offer enough pace to compensate for its cost. If you want a quick 3008, it’s worth bearing in mind that the 1.6-litre petrol engined version offers similar performance but costs £6000 less. 

The cheaper 3008s – which are also more efficient – are too good to warrant the extra outlay on this model. The 3008 is a great SUV, but we’d sooner point you towards a lesser-specced model.

Peugeot 3008 2.0 BlueHDi 180 GT

Location Chesterfield; On sale December; Price £32,995; Engine 4 cyls, 1997cc, diesel; Power 178bhp at 3750rpm; Torque 295Ib ft at 2000rpm; Gearbox 6-spd automatic; Kerb weight 1465kg; 0-62mph 8.9sec; Top speed 131mph; Economy 58.9mpg (combined); CO2/tax band 124g/km, 21%; Rivals Seat Ateca 2.0 TDI; Nissan Qashqai 1.6 dCi

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bowsersheepdog 22 November 2016

Fat lion

Another needlessly massive jeep that'll never be driven up a kerb let alone the side of a mountain. Occasionally jerks drive their jeeps up the footpath where I walk my dog, and invariably they run their front bumper up against my knees and refuse to go around, meaning we have to go onto the muddy grass because they're scared to get their tyres dirty. Off-roaders my arse.

As for winter driving, a car on decent winter tyres is safer on snowy roads than those bloated lumps.

Deputy 22 November 2016

Not an SUV fan...

But I have to disagree bowsersheepdog. This 3008 has a very similar length & width dimensions footprint to a Golf/Focus etc. If people bought these and not large SUVs then lots of our parking issues would be helped.
bowsersheepdog 22 November 2016

Deputy wrote:

Deputy wrote:

But I have to disagree bowsersheepdog. This 3008 has a very similar length & width dimensions footprint to a Golf/Focus etc. If people bought these and not large SUVs then lots of our parking issues would be helped.

I am convinced that parking issues would be better alleviated if people bought a 308 or a Golf or equivalent instead.

Where I park when I go into town it is noticeable with jeeps of all sizes that their drivers leave much larger gaps to the next vehicle. It is quite common to see two take up a space where three vehicles would fit if parked closer together.

Whether this is due to the drivers not having a clue where the ends of their jeep are, a feeling that their vehicles are difficult to manoeuvre, or a manifestation of a selfish streak in jeep drivers I have no way of knowing. But I am certain that the phenomenon, while not entirely absent, is far less frequent in car drivers, who usually park closer to the next vehicle, fitting in more cars to a given space.

xxxx 23 November 2016

Choice

bowsersheepdog wrote:
Deputy wrote:

But I have to disagree bowsersheepdog. This 3008 has a very similar length & width dimensions footprint to a Golf/Focus etc. If people bought these and not large SUVs then lots of our parking issues would be helped.

I am convinced that parking issues would be better alleviated if people bought a 308 or a Golf or equivalent instead.

Where I park when I go into town it is noticeable with jeeps of all sizes that their drivers leave much larger gaps to the next vehicle. It is quite common to see two take up a space where three vehicles would fit if parked closer together.

Whether this is due to the drivers not having a clue where the ends of their jeep are, a feeling that their vehicles are difficult to manoeuvre, or a manifestation of a selfish streak in jeep drivers I have no way of knowing. But I am certain that the phenomenon, while not entirely absent, is far less frequent in car drivers, who usually park closer to the next vehicle, fitting in more cars to a given space.

Not sure why you keep going on about Jeep's, that's a make/model of car not a type of car, the rest of your rant is just personal opinion and bias, just think of 'SUV's' as taller hatch backs (which they are) and you're sleep at night.

bomb 23 November 2016

Autocar wrote:

Autocar wrote:

The 2.0-litre diesel is very competitive against its rivals in that respect, being faster and yet more fuel efficient than an equivalent Nissan Qashqai

There is no equivalent Qashqai. The biggest diesel engine in that range is the 1.6 dCi 130PS.

bowsersheepdog 23 November 2016

xxxx wrote:

xxxx wrote:
bowsersheepdog wrote:
Deputy wrote:

But I have to disagree bowsersheepdog. This 3008 has a very similar length & width dimensions footprint to a Golf/Focus etc. If people bought these and not large SUVs then lots of our parking issues would be helped.

I am convinced that parking issues would be better alleviated if people bought a 308 or a Golf or equivalent instead.

Where I park when I go into town it is noticeable with jeeps of all sizes that their drivers leave much larger gaps to the next vehicle. It is quite common to see two take up a space where three vehicles would fit if parked closer together.

Whether this is due to the drivers not having a clue where the ends of their jeep are, a feeling that their vehicles are difficult to manoeuvre, or a manifestation of a selfish streak in jeep drivers I have no way of knowing. But I am certain that the phenomenon, while not entirely absent, is far less frequent in car drivers, who usually park closer to the next vehicle, fitting in more cars to a given space.

Not sure why you keep going on about Jeep's, that's a make/model of car not a type of car, the rest of your rant is just personal opinion and bias, just think of 'SUV's' as taller hatch backs (which they are) and you're sleep at night.

Whose opinion do you normally post then?

bowsersheepdog 23 November 2016

xxxx wrote:

xxxx wrote:
bowsersheepdog wrote:
Deputy wrote:

But I have to disagree bowsersheepdog. This 3008 has a very similar length & width dimensions footprint to a Golf/Focus etc. If people bought these and not large SUVs then lots of our parking issues would be helped.

I am convinced that parking issues would be better alleviated if people bought a 308 or a Golf or equivalent instead.

Where I park when I go into town it is noticeable with jeeps of all sizes that their drivers leave much larger gaps to the next vehicle. It is quite common to see two take up a space where three vehicles would fit if parked closer together.

Whether this is due to the drivers not having a clue where the ends of their jeep are, a feeling that their vehicles are difficult to manoeuvre, or a manifestation of a selfish streak in jeep drivers I have no way of knowing. But I am certain that the phenomenon, while not entirely absent, is far less frequent in car drivers, who usually park closer to the next vehicle, fitting in more cars to a given space.

Not sure why you keep going on about Jeep's, that's a make/model of car not a type of car, the rest of your rant is just personal opinion and bias, just think of 'SUV's' as taller hatch backs (which they are) and you're sleep at night.

Oh, and while we're on the subject of personal opinion and bias:

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/jeep

Mikey C 22 November 2016

33k?

33k for a mid range Peugeot crossover, ouch
Deputy 22 November 2016

It does look smart

But the review has no details of the extra kit you get. Would be far more useful instead of cut and pasting from the brochure the kit list to describe if they are worth it. Do the massage seats actually rub away aches? Does the 8.0 inch touchscreen respond like a modern smartphone? Does the LCD dash work better than normal dials? Is the adaptive cruise overly sensitive or useful........? But at least we didn't have 13 paragraphs on SUV handling.... ;-)

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