From £11,349
Base diesel Peugeot 208 is quite perky and civil, but 1.2 petrol is a better bet.

Our Verdict

Peugeot 208

Peugeot has shown dynamic promise of late. Will the Peugeot 208 be a hit?

What is it?

With the new 208, Peugeot is out to recapture some of the magic of the 205, its phenomenally successful 1983 supermini, notable among many things for the zip, civility and economy of its diesels. Peugeot did much to popularise diesel superminis, even if the base version was a normally aspirated, rev-shy device. 

Now all three 208 diesels are turbocharged, this entry-level 1.4 scoring 67bhp and a 13.5sec 0-62mph time. More important are the 83mpg and 87g/km of CO2 achieved with a five-speed robotised gearbox (the manual does 74.3mpg and 98g/km).

What's it like?

Peugeot's old-school robotised shift does a better job here than in the 508 1.6 HDi. But the 208 would clearly be better off with the planned dual-clutch 'box many rivals offer. Anyway, the annoying fade and surge you feel during brisk acceleration has been dampened, even if its shifts are Sunday-afternoon lazy. 

The engine delivers decent pep if you mine its mid-ranges with the paddles, but keen drivers will favour the manual. The 1.4 HDi's cornering powers aren't bad, the main disappointment being overly pointy steering caused by the small wheel, and the system's shortage of road feel. 

More serious for many will be the bizarre location of the dials, which are irritatingly obscured by the wheel.

Should I buy one?

Still, this 208 rides well and is tidily finished and civilised with it, even if the Fiesta and Polo are more polished.

Price: £14,595; 0-62mph: 13.5sec; Top speed: 101mph; Economy: 83.0mpg (combined); CO2: 87g/km; Kerb weight: 1060kg; Engine: 4 cyls, 1398cc, turbodiesel; Power: 67bhp at 4000rpm; Torque: 99lb ft at 1750rpm; Gearbox: 5-spd robotised manual

Join the debate

Comments
10

25 May 2012

How much cheaper is the manual version over this?

It may grab the head line figures but I would bet the extra cost over the traditional gearboxed version would mean pay back will be in the twenty thousand mile a year bracket.

 

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

25 May 2012

Wasn't this very car reviewed a couple of weeks back?

26 May 2012

The obscured dials would drive me nuts.Like many Peugeots,a good but not great car.At the very least the styling is much improved now.

27 May 2012

Flash Harry wrote:

The obscured dials would drive me nuts.Like many Peugeots,a good but not great car.At the very least the styling is much improved now.

It was clear from the first pics of the 208 that the position of the dials would be a problem, and every test I've read so far has confirmed this.

How can a major car company get this basic detail so wrong?

28 May 2012

I sat in a 208 in a UK showroom on saturday and the dials were not obscured by the wheel for me - I'm 5'8". The steering wheel is bizarrely small but that is something that appeals to me. 

28 May 2012

catnip wrote:

Flash Harry wrote:

The obscured dials would drive me nuts.Like many Peugeots,a good but not great car.At the very least the styling is much improved now.

It was clear from the first pics of the 208 that the position of the dials would be a problem, and every test I've read so far has confirmed this.

How can a major car company get this basic detail so wrong?

 

Sit it in first before making such a sweeping statement. I've sat in several and don't have a problem seeing the dials. I'm 6'3"

19 July 2012

 

catnip wrote:

 

Flash Harry wrote:

 

The obscured dials would drive me nuts.Like many Peugeots,a good but not great car.At the very least the styling is much improved now.

 

 

It was clear from the first pics of the 208 that the position of the dials would be a problem, and every test I've read so far has confirmed this.

 

How can a major car company get this basic detail so wrong?

 

 

 

 

Nope, PEUGEOT didn't get it wrong with the dials+ small steering wheel.

I had the 208 for couple of days with my girlfriend and both of us were totally fine with the visibility to instrument panel. (I am six feet tall and my girlfriend, five foot 4).

Infact the layout works so well, when I returned to my car which is a Golf, I got a shock that the steering wheel suddenly looked so huge and old fashioned! :o

 

30 May 2012

finally, a car manufacturer has placed the dials exactly where they are needed. Directly in the line of sight. why haven't we heard strong sentiments against cars with dials located at the centre of the dash. Yet somehow, i get the feeling that whenever Peugeot showcases any new innovation, that presents the opportune moment for some to elaborate that Peugeot engineers are quite imbecilic.

19 July 2012

VicciV wrote:

finally, a car manufacturer has placed the dials exactly where they are needed. Directly in the line of sight. why haven't we heard strong sentiments against cars with dials located at the centre of the dash. Yet somehow, i get the feeling that whenever Peugeot showcases any new innovation, that presents the opportune moment for some to elaborate that Peugeot engineers are quite imbecilic.

 

I feel exactly the same way about the dials. 

But something tells me that this time; others may follow because with more and more infotainments that are invading the cabin, the only way to put them (the displays) where it really belongs (safely) is in front of the driver where Peugeot has located its dials.

6 June 2012

The claimed fuel economy figures on small engined cars seem to be getting furthe and further away from the reality of daily use - I'd bet this comes in mid 50's early 60's mpg in a real life test.

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