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New Track Pack brings some lightweight options to the McLaren 570S, and it only enhances an already stellar package

Our Verdict

McLaren 570S

Is this a genuine supercar slayer for top-rank sports car money?

  • First Drive

    McLaren 570S Track Pack 2017 review

    New Track Pack brings some lightweight options to the McLaren 570S, and it only enhances an already stellar package
  • First Drive

    2015 McLaren 570S review

    "They don’t call it a supercar, but you and I would. McLaren’s ‘entry-level’ model is ultra-fast and extremely engaging"
Mark Tisshaw
14 March 2017

What is it?

You need a PHD to try and cut through the complexity of the Porsche 911 range. But that complexity and the constant addition of new models is no coincidence: with sports cars, having the latest new model on the market is crucial, for most sales of any particular variant are in the first year.

That’s why Mercedes-AMG is taking a leaf out the 911 book with an expanded Mercedes-AMG GT range, and why McLaren is increasing the models offered in its Sports Series. To that end, meet the latest addition to the McLaren 570S range: the McLaren 570S Track Pack.

Okay, this isn’t a proper full-fat variant in the way a 540C differs to a 570S, and then again to a 570GT, it instead nudges the 570S into somewhat of a race circuit-shaped direction, for which the name is a bit of a giveaway.

What's it like?

The McLaren 570S, a five-star Autocar road test car, is a fine base on which to build, but equally, a formula you don’t want to tamper with too much. So to that end, the Track Pack’s changes are minimal: you get lightweight race seats, an interior shod completely in Alcantara, super-lightweight alloy wheels, a few MSO-sourced exterior colour and trim tweaks, and a 12mm taller rear wing, which adds an extra 29kg of downforce at 150mph.

It’s all about weight saving, the total diet shaving 25kg from the 570S’s 1313kg kerb weight. Throw in the extra Track Telemetry software from the 675 LT and P1 displayed on the infotainment screen, and you’ve a package with a £16,500 premium over a standard 570S.

And it’s amazing what difference a few little tweaks can make to the overall experience, and all in a good way in the 570S’s case. Take that Alcantara-wrapped steering wheel, for example. It feels special, sporty and involving in your hands, making the superb steering feel (from a hydraulic system, remember) spread right to the palm of your hands.

Alcantara is the material also used to trim the lightweight race seats, which look snug and firm on first acquaintance, yet reveal themselves to be perfectly comfortable even for a cross-continent drive. The material is grippy and the seat surrounds are highly supportive, so you feel fixed in the centre of the car, but in no way is the experience a claustrophobic or uncomfortable one.

Elsewhere, the rest of the 570S’s superb dynamic package is evident in the Track Pack, albeit we were testing the car on winter tyres ahead of an excursion up a snowy Swiss mountain. It retains its supercar pace and poise, from the responsive 562bhp 3.8-litre V8 engine to the witchcraft being worked by the suspension to create a car that turns in like nothing else for this money. Yet, it still rides in a way that would put many a family hatchback to shame.

Should I buy one?

There is no sports car that does a better impression of a supercar than a McLaren 570S. That’s truer than ever in this new Track Pack version, which nudges the 570S even closer to a supercar in the way it involves you in the driving experience, but almost magically, with no loss of that now typical McLaren usability

McLaren 570S Track Pack

Price £159,750; Engine V8, 3799cc, twin-turbocharged petrol; Power 562bhp at 7500rpm; Torque 443lb ft at 5000-6500rpm; Gearbox 7-spd dual-clutch auto; Kerb weight 1288kg (dry); Top speed 204mph; 0-62mph 3.2sec; Economy 26.6mpg; CO2/tax band 249g/km, 37% Rivals Honda NSX, Audi R8 V10

Join the debate

Comments
9

14 March 2017
...a fantastic colour!

14 March 2017
Lovely, and I like the way the interior trim matches the brake calipers.

14 March 2017
it looks now the 720 has launched! McLaren is running like an express train- every new model is a major step forward. The 12C looks antique compared to this lot.... Stupendous effort from a great British Company. Having missed out on Sir John Surtees can we now have Lord Ron? Oh sorry, he never was a stylist for Sam Cam. Bugger!

14 March 2017
[quote=johnfaganwilliams] Having missed out on Sir John Surtees can we now have Lord Ron? Oh sorry, he never was a stylist for Sam Cam. Bugger![/quote] No problem, as long as the current government is in power, all you need to do to get a peerage, is give money to the Tory party.

14 March 2017
A fantastic looking car, want one. Well done again Mclaren.

14 March 2017
I've been lucky enough to enjoy some spirited road drives in a good friends 540, it's really fantastic in just about every respect compared to my existing Porsche Cayman GT4, in fact it makes the GT4 feel very slow and rather cumbersome. But there is one issue that shines bright in the Cayman, and stops me getting into debt swapping marques. From what the salesman at McLaren said to me just a couple of weeks ago when I made my first enquiry, a McLaren, in order to maintain it's warranty needs to be taken to McLaren before every track day , and back again after every track day, which is fine, but in my case as a retired enthusiast, my GT4 has completed over thirty track days in one year with standard servicing,( and quite a lot of replacement brake rotors ), thirty days out playing is just about OK with my wife, but another sixty days shuffling back and forth to McLaren could turn things nasty ! I also have no idea the cost of the pre and post track day checks ?

15 March 2017
[quote=Ravon]I've been lucky enough to enjoy some spirited road drives in a good friends 540, it's really fantastic in just about every respect compared to my existing Porsche Cayman GT4, in fact it makes the GT4 feel very slow and rather cumbersome. But there is one issue that shines bright in the Cayman, and stops me getting into debt swapping marques. From what the salesman at McLaren said to me just a couple of weeks ago when I made my first enquiry, a McLaren, in order to maintain it's warranty needs to be taken to McLaren before every track day , and back again after every track day, which is fine, but in my case as a retired enthusiast, my GT4 has completed over thirty track days in one year with standard servicing,( and quite a lot of replacement brake rotors ), thirty days out playing is just about OK with my wife, but another sixty days shuffling back and forth to McLaren could turn things nasty ! I also have no idea the cost of the pre and post track day checks ?[/quote] I am sure if you can afford one, the price of checks will be irrelevant.

16 March 2017
Ok, we don't need tests of Dacias and Skodas every week (no offence intended, at all!) but quite frankly: how relevant is it to most people that 12mm on the rear spoiler add 29 kg of downforce at 150 mph? I am NOT a grumpy old g*t; I simply feel that a mainstream magazine like Autocar ought to revise its editorial policy just a tad... When a car is sold in hundreds, it is hardly more than a dream for most people who are more concerned with 'real-world' motors, brilliant as that car might be! Ok, back to my dark cave...

Hi,

one more try and then it has to be 'goodbye': I have read Autocar for more years than enough but since moving abroad, there has been quite alot of difficulty with the site; can we sort this out once and for all, PLEASE? pretty please? etc.

18 March 2017
Can you or McLaren stop quoting dry weight please ? It's misleading and unrealistic. DIN weight is fine but frankly it's the EC weight or, to be more accurate, the weight of the owner that makes for the final 'real' weight. The 570S's 1313kg appeals to my Colin Chapmanesque sensibilities. However, if you add just the liquids and a full tank of fuel to a 'standard' 570S you're within 20 odd kilos of Porsche 991.2 C2 which, though a much slower car, has a lot more practicality. Of course, I'm not comparing the two but 'real world' weights ought to be quoted so we're not duped into thinking that we are driving a light-weight sports car when, in fact, we are driving a portly GT. Thank God for Lotus.

BertoniBertone

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