From £49,9009
Our pick of the new Jaguar F-type coupé range, and instantly a classic among sports cars

Our Verdict

Jaguar F-Type

The Jaguar F-Type has given the big cat back its roar, but can the 2017 updates keep at bay its closest rivals including the masterful Porsche 911?

  • First Drive

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    Jaguar F-Type 400 Sport 2017 review

    Revised F-Type brings with it a special-edition model that aims to combine the V6’s agility with the V8’s performance at a keen price
Steve Cropley Autocar
19 March 2014

What is it?

The S coupé represents Jaguar’s pinnacle of six-cylinder F–type performance, a car that admittedly falls a little short of the V8’s Ferrari-level performance, but saves its buyer nearly £25,000 against the top-performance model and has a unique character and capability of its own. 

It is powered by the highest output version of the supercharged V6 going, a potent 375bhp edition, which drives through an eight-speed ZF automatic gearbox whose special Jaguar-designed electronics allow it either to function as a full automatic or to be controlled manually via steering-column paddles. 

There is a special Dynamic regime that holds gears longer and changes up quicker, operable in either automatic or manual modes.

Launched more than six months after the convertible F-type, the coupé is much more than the open-topped car with the sun blocked out. It is considerably more rigid, a property that has allowed Jaguar’s engineers to stiffen the suspension (for better agility and body control) and sharpen the steering - to make this arguably the best handling road-going Jaguar ever.

What's it like?

It’s a consummate driver’s car, that’s what. The S coupé has all the weight distribution advantages of the basic coupé, along with bigger steel brakes (380mm fronts against the entry model’s 354mm units) and an extra 50bhp on tap from the same 3.0-litre supercharged V6 that powers the base car. 

Among other dynamic advantages you get bigger (19-inch) wheels as standard and a mechanical limited-slip differential to limit wheelspin on quick departures from rest. 

The near-identical torque curves for the six-cylinder models shows there’s a very small “oomph” difference (about 7 lb ft) between the base and S-models in the mid-ranges. 

You have to take the V6S unit right to its 6500rpm redline to find the 50bhp of extra performance, but if you do you cut 0.3 seconds off the 0-60mph time (now 4.8 seconds) and push the top speed to 171mph. This is a quick car in any company.

However, as with every F-type, the S coupe’s strongest suit is the handling. Huge grip, terrific steering, near-perfect stability. Unlike the entry car the S gets adaptive dampers, which assess road and driving conditions and choose damper rates accordingly. 

The result is more appropriate damping at either end of the spectrum, a little more suppleness at slow speed over bumps; a little more control when the car is being pressed hard through bends. The standard system is good, but if you drive the pair one after the other you definitely notice the difference. 

Should I buy one?

Why not? This is one of the finest and quickest driver’s cars on the road, especially in the performance bracket. It’s better value, for sure, than the thundering V8 flagship (although many will find that car’s huge potential irresistible) and has a bit more polish and capability than the entry-level coupé, which is around £10,000 cheaper. 

It has rivals from other brands, of course, but licks any Aston for capability-versus-price (and doesn’t lack name-appeal) and affords the driver a completely different experience from the rear- or mid-engined Porsche range. For me (but not everyone) long nose and short boot wins every time.

Jaguar F-type S coupe

Price £60,235; 0-60mph 4.9 sec; Top speed 171mph; Economy 31.0mpg (combined); Co2 213g/km; Kerb weight 1594kg; Engine V6, supercharged, 2995cc; Installation Front, longitudinal, red; Power 375bhp at 6500rpm; Torque 339lb ft at 3500-05000rpm; Gearbox Eight-speed auto, paddle shift

Join the debate

Comments
16

19 March 2014
I'm no expert but all three articles are very poorly reported and full of contradicting statements. Just saying.

19 March 2014
The F-Type is a very good car and I'm all for supporting 'British' manufacturers but this really is getting into the territory of over reporting. 4 reviews on one low volume niche sports car that brings little new to the market however good it might be, is excessive.

19 March 2014
What's with the multitude of switches/buttons on the doors? How many gadgets does one door need?

20 March 2014
WarrenL wrote:

What's with the multitude of switches/buttons on the doors? How many gadgets does one door need?

Electric seat controls, very much like what mercedes do.

19 March 2014
The only problem I have with this F Type is it's difficult for me to decide which of the 3 I would have if I was in the market for a coupe.
But let me make it clear if I was the Jaguar looks favourite.
Credit where credit is due Jaguar have pulled a blinder out of the hat and made something that is really desirable.
Credit too to the bosses at Tata who have supported it.
I predict this is going to be a big hit in the States and the fact that it originates from one of our own companies just makes me proud of what we can achieve with the right management & workforce here in the UK.
The only thing I would want to say to those that are already tired of hearing about the new Jaguar is F**K you.

 Offence can only be taken not given- so give it back!

19 March 2014
I do think the F Type coupe is an excellent piece of british automotive engineering but that 'S' badge, is plain naff, does anyone know if it has any history behind it or is it just a poor piece of design adorning a very desirable one.

19 March 2014
I like it. Will take one in Powder Blue.

20 March 2014
Top Gear demurs: " the F-type Coupe pitches and bobbles on choppy road surfaces. A 911 is more compliant overall and less likely to have you on a hotline to your osteopath ".
And the car is a bit of a handful in the wet.
So I'm not so sure about the rating of 4,5 stars.

20 March 2014
Conte Candoli wrote:

Top Gear demurs: " the F-type Coupe pitches and bobbles on choppy road surfaces. A 911 is more compliant overall and less likely to have you on a hotline to your osteopath ".
And the car is a bit of a handful in the wet.
So I'm not so sure about the rating of 4,5 stars.

Top Gear comic Vs Cropley? I know who I believe.

jer

20 March 2014
Now top gear can be amusing but don't take it too seriously :)

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