From £19,3568
Hybrid Hyundai Ioniq makes a convincing case for itself compared with Toyota's Prius, if less so in the wider family hatch arena

Our Verdict

Hyundai Ioniq

It may not be particularly exciting, but the Hyundai Ioniq Electric and Hybrid varieties are decent additions to the UK's growing low emission marketplace

What is it?

The Hyundai Ioniq is something of a trailblazer; it’s the first car to be offered in three electrified states. There’s a pure EV model capable of 174 miles on a charge, a petrol-electric parallel hybrid model that we’re driving here and a plug-in hybrid that will arrive in 2017.

It’s all part of Hyundai’s intention to have as many as 28 ‘eco-friendly’ models on sale by 2020, and its hybrid certainly fits that bill. It features a modified 104bhp version of Hyundai’s 1.6-litre Kappa petrol engine, which, thanks in part to its Atkinson cycle, now has 40% thermal efficiency - around 15% better than the traditional Otto cycle.

Stored beneath the rear seats is a 1.56kWh battery, which, via an electric motor, takes maximum combined power to 139bhp and combined twist to 195lb ft. Unlike the Ioniq's main rival, the Toyota Prius, Hyundai as opted for a specially developed six-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission instead of a CVT unit, too.

Because its engine, clutch, electric motor and gearbox are mounted on one common shaft, Hyundai has been able to keep packaging and weight to a minimum. The result of all these efforts is CO2 emissions of as low as 79g/km and official fuel economy of as high as 83.1mpg should you choose the right trim and therefore the right alloy wheels with eco tyres. 

What's it like?

Not surprisingly, you don't come away from driving the Ioniq dumbfounded by scintillating dynamics, but then, that's not the point, and the same can be said of Toyota's Prius. For what it's worth, it is about as quick as a Prius on paper and probably just about feels so from behind the wheel.

Of greater note is the more agreeable way in which its power is delivered, via six ratios rather than via one continuous stream. It makes the Ioniq feel more responsive and does a better job of keeping its comparably whiny petrol engine in check under heavy throttle applications. Knocking the gear selector left into Sport mode forces it to hold on to low ratios for longer, causing more din.

There's very little enjoyment to be gained from the Hyundai's steering, though. There's a large dead patch around the straight-ahead to which a distinct weight is applied soon after - too much if Sport mode is engaged. Turn-in is relaxed and the rack's speed has clearly been designed to cope with city driving first and foremost, although there's no obvious shortage of grip at the front axle and the Ioniq's body remains nicely upright unless really hustled.

Again, the fact that the Ioniq isn't the last word in handling prowess comes as no surprise, but its ride quality has to be nearer the mark. Remember, thanks to firms such as Uber, more and more people are experiencing Toyota's Prius from the back seats - a more comfortable experience since Toyota's latest effort hit our roads. 

The HEV Ioniq gets more advanced multi-link rear suspension than its pure EV stablemate, perhaps because Hyundai realises the rear seats will be used more often. The result is a largely compliant ride, both in the speed-bump primary sense and over broken asphalt. That said, hitting sharp expansion joints at speed causes obvious noise and slightly instability in the body at times.

The cabin space race probably goes to the Toyota - just. Both cars cater for a couple of tall adults well, and the same can be said of the rear seats, but the Toyota's slightly more generous knee room edges it the win. Boot space is a different story; the Hyundai offers more than 100 litres extra on paper, even if the space is rather shallow in reality. At least its rear seats split 60/40 and fold to give you the option of a deeper rear cabin.  

When it comes to quality and infotainment, though, the Hyundai looks the stronger. In range-topping trim, its dash plastics and switchgear look and feel more consistent, while its bright, responsive 8.0in touchscreen with TomTom sat-nav looks the part and is easy to follow. Standard kit includes climate control, a rear parking camera with sensors, DAB radio, Bluetooth and adaptive cruise control. 

Should I buy one?

Viewed next to rival family hatchbacks powered solely by combustion means, the Ioniq - like the Prius - fails to stir us enough to give it class honours. There are diesel alternatives that offer competitive running costs for private and company buyers while riding and handling more competently and ticking the space and practicality boxes at the same time.

A Prius running on 15in wheels sits a tax band lower, will officially use less fuel and feels more agile, but it costs more to buy in the first place and plays second fiddle to the Hyundai's preferable gearbox, better interior quality and slicker infotainment. It'll be an intriguing group test back on UK roads, but at this stage, the Ioniq deserves to be recognised as a sound hybrid family hatch choice. 

Hyundai Ioniq HEV

Location The Netherlands; On sale October; Price From £19,995; Engine 4 cyls, 1580cc, petrol, plus 32kW electric motor; Power (combined) 139bhp at 5700rpm; Torque (combined) 195lb ft at 4000rpm; Gearbox 6-spd dual-clutch automatic; Kerb weight 1370kg; 0-62mph 10.8sec; Top speed 115mph; Economy 83.1mpg (combined); CO2/tax band 79g/km, 15%

Join the debate

Comments
13

5 July 2016
Would be good to see it tested against eco minded 1.0 petrol triples and 1.6 diesels also. Can't help think the PHEV will be a better option. How can it be more efficient to lug around an electric motor and battery pack as a standard hybrid?

5 July 2016
Not sure why they bothered with this. Sales will be limited as it will be seen as a stop gap till the Plug-in or Full EV version arrives, this will be the game changer.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

5 July 2016
As you say, taxi driver special. The Really significant version will be the PHEV as it will no doubt be a company car tax killing below 50g/km (on paper) and if the EV range is good enough for many commuters it will be very popular.

5 July 2016
I'm not so sure. Maybe this hybrid offers the best compromise, least expensive to buy, no range issues, probably the most luggage space courtesy of a small battery. True, it will cost more to fuel, but then there is no inconvenient charging required and the added fuel cost will be counterbalanced by lower depreciation costs with less money tied up in the car. And you're still getting the big advantage of recovering energy recovery, which can be used for performance gain or fuel saving. I suspect it will be most popular of the three.

5 July 2016
With European governments lining up to introduce penalties for diesel cars, and cities gearing up to ban them altogether, it seems really odd that Autocar is still favouring diesel in these articles.

Toxic emissions and noise are major drawbacks of diesel and this technology is set to decline as a power source for light vehicles like cars and vans. Depreciation alone is going to become a major problem, because who will want a diesel car that you can't drive into your nearest city?

So buying a new diesel car in 2016 is a mugs game, surely.

5 July 2016
HiPo 289 wrote:

With European governments lining up to introduce penalties for diesel cars, and cities gearing up to ban them altogether, it seems really odd that Autocar is still favouring diesel in these articles.

Toxic emissions and noise are major drawbacks of diesel and this technology is set to decline as a power source for light vehicles like cars and vans. Depreciation alone is going to become a major problem, because who will want a diesel car that you can't drive into your nearest city?

So buying a new diesel car in 2016 is a mugs game, surely.

To date no city in Europe has any plans to ban diesel cars except for plans to ban older petrol and diesel cars.
Your opinion that diesel cars produce toxic emissions without mentioning the fact that direct injection petrol cars produce lots of particulates and deadly poisonous carbon monoxide in large quantities plus use far more fuel is just that your opinion not fact.
As is shown by tests published online cars like the Prius fail to match the economy of diesel.
As for buying a diesel car in 2016 bring a mugs game, exactly which car did you buy with your own money? And what business is it if yours to offer advice to car buyers?

6 July 2016
What kind of shill are you? Evidence from testing over the past 12 months shows that diesel cars - even new ones - emit much higher emissions than claimed. Air quality in European cities is appalling, largely because of diesel. London has smog again, 50 years after the Clean Air Act. Now we need to act.

5 July 2016
Not really a rational argument, I realise, but I'd rather be seen in one of these over a Prius.

On a technical level, I am not a fan of CVT transmissions, so if I were in the market for this sort of vehicle, just that small fact would probably swing it for me.

Just as a side note, Autocar, you commented on the rear seat space and passenger carrying capacity (justifiably so, considering as you suggested most will end up as mini cabs) but you show no picture?

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

5 July 2016
Not really a rational argument, I realise, but I'd rather be seen in one of these over a Prius.

On a technical level, I am not a fan of CVT transmissions, so if I were in the market for this sort of vehicle, just that small fact would probably swing it for me.

Just as a side note, Autocar, you commented on the rear seat space and passenger carrying capacity (justifiably so, considering as you suggested most will end up as mini cabs) but you show no picture?

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

5 July 2016
"there are diesel alternatives that offer higher, but still competitive, running costs for private and company buyers"

As ever, road testers comparing a petrol automatic with a diesel manual

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