Engine options for the Grand Tourneo Connect comprise a 1.5-litre Duratorq diesel in 99bhp or 118bhp outputs, with five- and six-speed manual, or six-speed automatic transmissions respectively.

If you’re expecting there to be a downside to using a small-capacity diesel engine to propel a vehicle that has a 1785kg kerb weight and frontal area of a garden shed, you’d be right.

A front-mounted engine drives the front wheels through a manual gearbox; an automatic is offered but only for the petrol

But it’s not the Ford Tourneo’s lack of outright pace that is particularly disappointing, or surprising; a 0-60mph time of 13.2sec is par for the high-output 1.5-litre diesel's 68bhp-per-tonne course. It’s the engine’s from-rest hesitancy that takes the most driving around.

You’ll want quite a few revs engaged before slipping the clutch to get the Tourneo under way. Fail to apply sufficient revs and, if you don’t stall, there will be a small hesitation, as if the 1560cc, 118bhp engine realises how much work it has to do.

Once the motor has woken up, though, things are okay, and it’s extremely easy to swap between gears via the slick shift to keep the motor on the boil. Control weights are very good here, too: consistent, responsive and easily modulated.

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The motor is respectably quiet as well. There’s a little road noise, most notably from the rear, and more wind noise than in a lower MPV with smaller mirrors, but refinement gives no cause for concern; a cabin volume at idle of 43dB is extremely quiet.

And although 71dB at a 70mph cruise, at which the engine is spinning at 2600rpm, is above average, this isn’t the tin box that some might dismiss it as.

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