The TT RS comes onto the sports car market priced above the BMW M2 and the Mercedes-AMG SLC 43, and marginally above even the Porsche 718 Cayman S.

Ignoring its direct rivals and looking instead to other fast four-wheel-drive options in the hot hatchback and saloon categories, it looks even pricier still.

CAP expects residuals to be slightly better than many lesser TTs but still way below those of a Porsche 718 Cayman S

And yet, for what you’re getting on a bang-for-your-buck basis, it’s very hard to argue that £52,000 isn’t a very competitive price.

You’ll need an £80k Nissan GT-R or a £127k Porsche 911 Turbo to outsprint this car away from the lights, remember.

And Audi is far from mean with the car’s standard equipment level, giving you 19in alloys, heated nappa leather, Audi Connect wi-fi and connectivity and Virtual Cockpit as standard.

With a wealth of optional extras, we would advise adding the 20in alloys, Matrix LED headlights, Dynamic pack, carbonfibre fascia inlays and a Bang & Olufsen sound system. Granted these additions will set you back an additional £5315.

Our sources suggest that, for those buying on a monthly basis, the TT RS may suffer somewhat for its slightly weak residuals, the car being expected to shed fully 10 percent more of its original showroom price, over three years and 36,000 miles, than a like-for-like 718 Cayman S.

Few should have cause to complain about its fuel economy.

Our testing suggests that owners can expect to beat 35mpg on a moderate cruise – which, from a car capable of 60mph this quickly, is staggeringly good.

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