The fabric roof is heavily insulated and keeps wind noise to a subdued flutter over the windscreen when the hood is up, even at a fast cruise. Top-down, you get a fair bit of wind coming over the back deck, so it’s a shame the retractable wind deflector is a £425 option. Even so, you’re protected enough to be able to do a steady cruise without it getting uncomfortably blustery.

In short, with the help of the adaptive elements (steering weight, exhaust and throttle response as standard), the TT will be at home on a tedious daily commute, just as it will deliver a back-road strop with no small amount of driver satisfaction.

Vicky Parrott

Deputy reviews editor
The Roadster may have lost the coupé's small back seats, but the two that remain are supportive in all the right places

The dashboard is a wondrously high-tech affair that is unchanged from the coupé, so you get the huge Audi Virtual Cockpit digital readout (as standard on all models) that fills the driver’s binnacle.

There are the essential dials as well as all your critical info, from nav (if you’ve added it), through to audio functions and the car’s systems. It takes a fair bit of getting used to, but it does become easier with familiarity.

Rear visibility is predictably hampered by the roof when it's up, too, so you'll be conscious of the fairly huge blind-spot to your rear three-quarters - something that's pretty par for the course with any soft-top.

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The Roadster loses the comically tiny, uncomfortable back seats of the coupe, making way for an enclosed area into which the roof neatly tucks itself. While this means you’ve got less storage space, it also allows for a useful 280 litres of boot space (down from 305 litres in the tin-top), which will be more than enough for normal daily use.

And if you've ever wondered what ‘Vorsprung durch Technik’ means in the real world, here’s an example: the TT Roadster has microphones woven into its seatbelts, positioned close to your mouth, so that even your alfresco phone calls should be easily heard.

It’s an example of the attention to detail that makes the TT Roadster such a pleasant place to sit. It may have lost the coupé’s small back seats, but the two that remain are supportive in all the right places and, along with the steering wheel, have plenty of adjustment to accommodate most sizes.

It takes a moment to acquaint yourself with some of the buttons cleverly designed into air vents and the like, but rather than frustrate, this attention to detail only generates admiration, as do the top-notch materials used throughout.

On the standard equipment front, there are three core trims, two for the TTS and one for the TT RS. The entry-level Sport models get 18in alloys, xenon headlights, retractable rear spoiler, an acoustic hood, cruise control, and keyless entry and go as standard on the outside, while inside there is front sports seats, a leather and Alcantara upholstery, air conditioning, a flat-bottomed steering wheel and Audi's Virtual Cockpit 12.3in display complete with Bluetooth, USB connectivity and DAB radio.

Upgrade to S Line and you'll find your TT adorned with 19in alloy wheels, LED head and rear lights plus Audi's rear dynamic indicators, automatic wipers and lights, and a sporty bodykit, while those pining for a bit more exclusivity can opt for the Black Edition, which adds glossy black details, privacy glass, wind deflector and a Bang & Olufsen audio system to the package.

Want the air to pass through your hair a bit more quickly then maybe the TTS is for you, adding adaptive sports suspension, 19in alloys, an aggressive bodykit, a quad-exhaust system, a Nappa leather upholstery, heated sports seats and Audi's lane assist system, while the TTS Black Edition adds more glossy black trim and a Bang & Olufsen stereo system.

Topping the range is the 394bhp TT RS Roadster, which includes a seriously aggressive bodykit, as well as an Audi Sport tweaked braking system, suspension and steering, and twin oval exhaust system on the outside. Inside there is sat nav, dual-zone climate control, super sports seats, an Alcantara-covered steering wheel and gearlever, parking sensors and ambient interior LED lighting.

 

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