A warning light indicates that it’s time to pour in some more diesel exhaust fluid
Allan Muir
5 August 2016

Our Land Rover Discover Sport requires an AdBlue top up

Shortly before editorial assistant Doug Revolta borrowed the Discovery Sport for a holiday in Cornwall that included a visit to historic Pendennis Castle, the instrument display had begun to issue the occasional gentle warning that the diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) level was getting low.

DEF, better known as AdBlue, is a mixture of urea and distilled water used in modern diesel-engined cars to help clean up exhaust emissions, and you can’t afford to ignore the increasingly strident warnings for too long or the car will refuse to start.

I knew a top-up was looming but forgot to mention it to Doug before he set off for Cornwall, so it was hardly a surprise when he sent me a worried sounding text asking what he should do about the car’s renewed demands for AdBlue.

I told him to bring the car back as it was and I’d sort it out.

This is the first diesel-engined car I’ve run for years, so the whole process of adding AdBlue was new to me, but I knew I’d be able to get bottles of the stuff at most service stations.

After consulting the handy leaflet on the subject that I found in the owner’s manual wallet, I bought two 1.5-litre spill-proof bottles, thinking that would be enough.

These bottles are designed to screw into the AdBlue filler spout — located in the engine bay, next to the bulkhead, in this case — so there’s no risk of making a mess. As it turned out, two bottles weren’t enough.

The service station didn’t have any more small bottles but pointed out that I could buy a 10-litre container of the fluid, with a fairly basic filler funnel, for barely any more than the £10 I’d paid for each of the 1.5-litre bottles.

Ten litres seemed excessive, so I drove off to another service station, where I added another 1.5 litres. Frustratingly, the warning light was still lit when I fired up the engine.

I was just about to give in and buy a 10-litre container when the light went out. I have no idea how close to being full the AdBlue tank is, but the car is happy for now.

Those 1.5-litre bottles strike me as a rip-off at £10 a pop. You’re mostly paying for the flash, idiot-proof container. Next time I’ll buy a 10-litre container and top up the tank the old-fashioned way.

I don’t expect any problems, but the weight of the 10-litre container and the height at which you have to hold it to reach the filler spout might make the task onerous for some.

Flexible front-end

Whenever I wash the Discovery Sport, I’m surprised at the flexibility of the grille and other front-end bodywork when I press on them.

The logical reason is probably that the nose is designed to be as forgiving as possible in a pedestrian impact. Given how robust the car feels when you’re not prodding it, that ought to be welcome news for pedestrians.

Land Rover Discovery Sport TD4 180 HSE auto

Mileage 8590 List price £39,400 Price as tested £42,222 Economy 32.9mpg Faults None Expenses 4.5 litres of Adblue £31

Read our previous reports:

A talented all-rounder

Practical test

Comfortable cruising

First report

Our Verdict

The Land Rover Discovery Sport
The new Land Rover Discovery Sport is the successor to the Freelander

The Freelander's replacement goes big on prettiness and packaging, and as a result becomes the class leader

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Comments
20

5 August 2016
Wow, a whole article on needing to pour some liquid into a car. Next weeks thrilling episode : removing squashed insect from windscreen.

7 August 2016
The bigger issue is the other liquid that needs to be poured into the DS with alarming frequency. Averaging below 33 mpg, the much vaunted Ingenium diesel appears to be LESS efficient than the old 2.2 Ford lump - which this magazine criticised as a real weak point when the car was launched.

5 August 2016
if you had actually taken the time to read the manual, or consult a dealer, or god knows, perhaps even googled the subject, the capacity of the adblue tank would have been found. (its 13.7 litres..)

Approx. Tank Capacity
(litres)
Potential
Consumption
Initial Warning of AdBlue
(1500 miles left)

Range Rover
18 litres
V6 - 1 litre per 560 miles

V8 - 1 litre per 400 miles
V6 - 8100 - 9000 miles

V8 - 5400 - 6000 miles

Range Rover Sport
18 litres
V6 - 1 litre per 560 miles

V8 - 1 litre per 400 miles
V6 - 8100 - 9000 miles

V8 - 5400 - 6000 miles

Range Rover Evoque
14.5 litres
1 litre per 530 miles
5800 - 6500 miles

Discovery (excl Commerical)
17.8 litres
1 litre per 500 miles
7000 - 7770 miles

Discovery Sport
13.7 litres
1 litre per 530 miles
5400 - 6050 miles

5 August 2016
Good on you young man for finding something remotely useful to say about this piece of cutting-edge journalism.

5 August 2016
L320 wrote:

Good on you young man for finding something remotely useful to say about this piece of cutting-edge journalism.

Thanks, I do try, but its getting harder.

5 August 2016
so a 1.5 litre bottle costing £10 max(5 times the cost of diesel) lasts about 750 miles. Just remember to adblue to your diesel running costs, along with higher initial costs.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

5 August 2016
xxxx wrote:

so a 1.5 litre bottle costing £10 max(5 times the cost of diesel) lasts about 750 miles. Just remember to adblue to your diesel running costs, along with higher initial costs.

Your scrapping the bottom of the barrel for negatives! The author did say a 10L cost not much more which works out around £2 for your 750 miles. But let's take your £10.

750miles in a 33mpg Land Rover = 23 gallons.

At £1.12 a litre = £118.50 every 750 miles

And you're complaining the owner of a £40,000 Landrover Discovery is going to complain about £10 let alone £2 if he has the sense to buy it in bulk?

5 August 2016
scotty5 wrote:
xxxx wrote:

so a 1.5 litre bottle costing £10 max(5 times the cost of diesel) lasts about 750 miles. Just remember to adblue to your diesel running costs, along with higher initial costs.

Your scrapping the bottom of the barrel for negatives! The author did say a 10L cost not much more which works out around £2 for your 750 miles. But let's take your £10.

750miles in a 33mpg Land Rover = 23 gallons.

At £1.12 a litre = £118.50 every 750 miles

And you're complaining the owner of a £40,000 Landrover Discovery is going to complain about £10 let alone £2 if he has the sense to buy it in bulk?

You forgot to add in the development cost, testing costs, build cost, installation cost of the injection system in the first place. All of which have to be paid for by someone. It's also one more thing to go wrong.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

5 August 2016
autocar wrote:

...but the weight of the 10-litre container and the height at which you have to hold it to reach the filler spout might make the task onerous for some.

On the otherhand, those with an IQ in double digits may pour the liquid from said 10-litre container in to a smaller container and then lift it up to the engine bay.

5 August 2016
scotty5 wrote:
autocar wrote:

...but the weight of the 10-litre container and the height at which you have to hold it to reach the filler spout might make the task onerous for some.

On the otherhand, those with an IQ in double digits may pour the liquid from said 10-litre container in to a smaller container and then lift it up to the engine bay.

Spillage is a big issue with DEF/Adblue as it can/will corrode the bodywork - that's why the 1.5/1.9 litre containers have a double valve and require screwing onto the filler - some brands, VW Group to my knowledge, also sell DEF/Adblue in 5/10 litre containers and sell a flexible hose that screws on to the filler and the container. Generally bought 10 litre containers just have a flexible spout so prone to spillage - the answer is to buy one large container, with the appropriate hose and then refill that from cheaper general containers. I don't know about JLR, but VW only charge £1.50/litre and they do the top-up for you.

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